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NC STATE UNIVERSITY 



1999-2000 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/undergraduatecat1999nort 



CONTENTS 

North Carolina State University 3 

Historical Sketch 3 

Mission of North Carolina State University 4 

North Carolina State University Administration and Offices 7 

Academic Calendar 12 

Academic Fields of Study and Degrees 13 

Arts Studies 15 

Honors and Scholars Programs 16 

Scholarships 17 

Special Academic Programs 18 

International Programs and Activities 20 

Admissions 23 

New Student Orientation 26 

Registration 26 

Tuition and Fees 27 

Financial Aid 30 

Housing for Students 30 

Academic Policies and Procedures 31 

Code of Student Conduct 44 

Student Services 44 

Student Activities 47 

Colleges, Departments and Programs of Study 52 

General Education Distribution Requirements 52 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 57 

School of Design 109 

College of Education and Psychology 121 

College of Engineering 137 

College of Forest Resources 175 

1 



College of Humanities and Social Sciences 190 

College of Management 204 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 21 1 

College of Textiles 237 

Collegcof Veterinary Medicine 248 

Division of Undergraduate Studies 250 

Graduate School 252 

Military Education and Training 252 

Department of Music 255 

Department of Physical Education 256 

Office of Research, Outreach, Extension and Economic Development 257 

NCSU Libraries 261 

Academic Computing 262 

Research Triangle 262 

Research Centers and Facilities 263 

University Advancement 269 

History of The University of North Carolina 271 

UNC Board of Governors 272 

Officers of the University of North Carolina 272 

Policy on illegal Drugs 272 

North Carolina State University Board of Tmstees 274 

North Carolina State University Administrative Council 274 

Teaching, Research, and Extension Faculty, Other Academic Personnel 275 

Index 332 



NC STATE UNIVERSITY 



North Carolina State University is a national center for research, teaching, and extension in the sciences and technologies, in 
the humanities and social sciences, and in a wide range of professional programs. 

Founded March 7, 1887, by the North Carolina General Assembly under the provisions of the national Land Grant Act, the 
University has marked more than a century of service to the state and the nation. Sharing the distinctive character of 
LandGrant universities nationwide, NC State has broad academic offerings, national and international linkages, and large- 
scale outreach, extension, and research activities. 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY HISTORICAL SKETCH 

On March 7,1887, the North Carolina General Assembly passed the act which authorized the establishment of the North 
Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. The Watauga Club of Raleigh and the statewide farmers' movement had 
convinced the legislature of the need to transfer the funds received by the state under the provisions of the Morrill Land Grant 
Act of 1862 from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill to a new landgrant college in Raleigh. The cornerstone of 
A. and M. College was laid in August, 1888, and its doors were officially opened on October 3, 1889. 

Alexander Q. Holladay, the college's first president (1889-1899), and a faculty of five offered courses in agriculture, 
horticulture, pure and agricultural chemistry, English, bookkeeping, history, mathematics, physics, practical mechanics, and 
military science. The fu-st freshman class numbered about fifty students. By the end of the institution's first decade the 
resident enrollment had reached 300. 

During the administration of George T. Winston (1899-1908) a new curriculum in textiles was developed and normal 
courses were offered in the summer for public school teachers, both men and women. The Agricultural Extension Service 
was established during the administration of Daniel H. Hill (1908-1916) and enrollment grew to more than 700. In 1917, 
during the adminisfration of Wallace C. Riddick (1916-1923), the institution's name was changed to North Carolina State 
College of Agriculture and Engineering. The infroduction of the word engineering was intended to reflect the increasing 
emphasis on the professional and theoretical as well as the practical aspects of technical education. 

In 1923, a major reorganization of the adminisfration of the college was begun, and President Riddick resigned to become the 
first dean of the new School of Engineering. Eugene Clyde Brooks (1923-1934), the fifth president of State College, 
continued the reorganization with the creation of the School of Agriculture (later renamed the School of Agriculture and 
Forestry), the School of Science and Business, the School of Education, the School of Textiles, and the Graduate School. 
Resident enrollment rose to nearly 2,000 in 1929 before the Depression caused a drop to approximately 1,500 in 1933. The 
first women graduates of State College received their degrees in 1927. 

In the midst of the Depression the General Assembly of 193 1 attempted to promote economy and to prevent unnecessary 
duplication among the three leading state institutions of higher education by establishing a single consolidated administration 
for the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State 

College of Agriculture and Engineering, and North Carolina College for Women in Greensboro. Dr. Frank Porter Graham, 
president of the University of North Carolina, was elected president of the consolidated university, and Dr. Brooks, with the 
title of vice president, continued as chief adminisfrative officer at State College. Among the consequences of consolidation 
were the phasing out of the School of Engineering at Chapel Hill and the School of Science and Business at Raleigh. A 
general college, later called the Basic Division, was established to provide two years of basic courses in humanities, social 
sciences, and natural sciences as a foundation for students in the various degree-granting technical and professional schools. 

Colonel John W. Harrelson (1934-1953), Class of 1909, was the fu-st alumnus to become adminisfrative head of State 
College. Under the consolidated organization his title was Dean of Adminisfration; later it was changed to Chancellor. 
During Harrelson's administration, the institution experienced the beginning of extraordinary growth in the aftermath of 
World War II. Two new schools were established: the School of Design and the School of Forestry. A multimillion dollar 
expansion program was completed during the administration of Carey H. Bostian (1953-1959), and the program of student 
activities was greatly enlarged, as the enrollment passed 5,000. 

The faculty and student population more than doubled during the adminisfration of John T. Caldwell (1959-1975) and 
another new school was organized: the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics (now Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences). The School of General Studies, the successor to the Basic Division, was renamed the School of 
Liberal Arts and was authorized to offer a ftill range of bachelor's and master's degree programs in the humanities and social 
sciences. The name of the institution itself was changed in 1965 to North Carolina State University, signifying its new role as 
a comprehensive university. 



NC State's enrollment passed 20,000 during the administration of Chancellor Joab L. Thomas (1976-1981). The School of 
Veterinar) Medicine was established, the name of the School of Liberal Arts was changed to School of Humanities and 
Social Sciences, and North Carolina State Universit>' was recognized as one of two major research universities within the 
statewide University of North Carolina. 

Bruce R. Poulton (1982-1990) became chancellor in the fall of 1982. A major expansion of the University's research budget, 
the establishment of a substantial endowment to provide enlarged resources for research equipment and endowed 
professorships, and the addition of the 1,000-acre Centennial Campus occurred during this administration. All of the schools 
were renamed colleges except for the School of Design and The Graduate School. In addition, the School of Education 
became the College of Education and Psychology. 

In 1990. Larr> K. Monteith. an alumnus and former Dean of the College of Engineering, became chancellor and NC State's 
eleventh chief administrative officer. Among his early initiatives were the creation of the Division of Undergraduate Studies 
and the First Year Experience Program. In 1992, the College of Management was established, and plans for a freshman 
college have recently been formalized. An Institutional Advancement Division, now known as University Advancement, was 
organized to include alumni relations, university relations, development, and advancement services. A Board of Visitors was 
created, comprised of nationally prominent scholars and business leaders, to advise the chancellor and Board of Trustees. 

The College of Textiles and ABB (Asea Brown Boveri), NC State's first corporate partner, moved to Centennial Campus in 
1991. Since then, the Centennial Campus celebrated its 10th anniversary and surpassed the $100 million mark in 
construction. The Engineering Graduate Research Center was the newest building on that campus at that time. 

In 1994, NC State was authorized to establish the Zeta Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. 

On August 1, 1998, Dr. Marye Anne Fox, a chemist and member of the National Academy of Sciences, became NC State 
University's 12th chancellor to assume the duties of the top post at the state's leading science, engineering and technology 
university. Chancellor Fox is focused on building the campus community, promoting partnerships, and adopting a business 
model that works. She has co-chaired the first National Academy of Sciences symposium ever held at NC State and 
encourages further growth on the university's Centennial Campus. Since her arrival. Chancellor Fox has traveled more than 
3,000 miles within the state to visit the hometowns of NC State students. She engaged business and community leaders and 
NC State alumni to learn more about the citizens' needs and the vital role of NC State in North Carolina's economic growth 
and success. 

MISSION OF NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY* 

The mission of North Carolina State University is to serve its students and the people of North Carolina as a Research I, land- 
grant university. Through the active integration of teaching, research, and extension. North Carolina State University creates 
an innovative learning environment that stresses mastery of fundamentals, intellectual discipline, creativity, problem solving, 
and responsibility. Enhancing its historic strengths in agriculture, science, and engineering with a commitment to excellence 
in a comprehensive range of academic disciplines. North Carolina State University provides leadership for intellectual, 
cultural, social, economic and technological development within the state, the nation and the world. 

•Approved by the North Carolina State University Board of Trustees on April 19, 1996. 

CAMPUS 

The central campus of the University, located west of the downtown area of Raleigh, consists of 179 major buildings on 623 
acres. Adjacent to the central campus are the new 1 ,000acre Centennial Campus and the College of Veterinary Medicine 
campus. Nearby are research farms; biology and ecology sites; genetics, horticulture, and floriculture nurseries; forests; and 
CarterFinley Stadium that together extend over 2,700 acres. Elsewhere across the state are research farms and a research 
forest of 82,000 acres. 

RESEARCH TRIANGLE 

NC State is one of the three Research Triangle universities along with Duke University in Durham and the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Within the 30 mile triangle formed by the three universities is the 6,800 acre Research 
Triangle Park, location of many public research agencies and private research centers of national and international 
corporations. 

FACULTY 

The University has approximately 6,200 employees, of which approximately 1 ,570 are instructional faculty. Among the 
many honors and recognition received by members of the faculty are nine memberships in the National Academy of Science 



and nine in the National Academy of Engineering, 60 named professorships, 21 University Distinguished Professorships, 108 
Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors, and currently over 355 members of the Academy of Outstanding Teachers. 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

The University is organized into nine colleges, the School of Design, the Graduate School, and the Division of 
Undergraduate Studies. The colleges are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Education and Psychology, Engineering, Forest 
Resources, Humanities and Social Sciences, Management, Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Textiles, and Veterinary 
Medicine. These colleges and schools offer baccalaureate degrees in 89 fields, master's degrees in 80 fields, and doctoral 
degrees in 5 1 fields. Together with more than 30 research centers and institutes, these colleges and schools also support a 
broad spectrum of more than 1,200 scientific, technological, and scholarly research endeavors. 

OUTREACH AND EXTENSION PROGRAMS 

As the state's only research university in the land-grant tradition, North Carolina State has the unique mission to serve the 
citizens of North Carolina through technical assistance, professional development, lifelong education, and technology transfer 
programs. The primary channel for fulfilling this mission is through the University's outreach and extension programs, 
centers and institutes that make a positive contribution to the quality of life for over a million of the state's residents on an 
annual basis. Expertise fi-om the various schools and colleges provides opportunities for improvements in the areas of 
economics and business, education and training, natural resources and environmental quality, the humanities, and food and 
fiber production. 

The Division of Continuing Studies is an integral component of the outreach effort, offering access to the knowledge and 
resources of the University. Annually, over 8,000 lifelong learners register in credit courses, both on and off campus, 
including those delivered via videocassette, cable and satellite throughout the region, the state, the nation and the world. In 
addition, Summer Sessions which is administered through the Division has an enrollment of ahnost 14,000 students. 
Participation in non-credit, continuing education offerings, a majority of which are implemented in the McKimmon Center, 
totals over 120,000 annually. 

STUDENTS 

In the 1998 fall semester, the university's regular term head count enrollment totaled 27,960. Included in this number were 
18,933 students in undergraduate degree programs, 5,101 in graduate degree programs, 301 First Professional and 3,164 
Lifelong Education students. The combined undergraduate and graduate enrollments by college were: Agriculture and Life 
Sciences - 4,267; Design - 715; Education and Psychology -1,694; Engineering - 6,561; Forest Resources -1,070; Humanities 
and Social Sciences - 3,060; Management - 2,660; Physical and Mathematical Sciences - 1,292; Textiles - 991; Veterinary 
Medicine - 41 1, and First Year College - 1,670. The student population included 2,719 African American students; 1,935 
other minority students, and 1 1,640 female students. Students at the university come from all 50 states, three United States 
territories, and 87 foreign countries. The international enrollment is a distinctive feature of the institution as 1,147 
international students give the campus a cosmopolitan atmosphere. 

ASSOCIATIONS 

The University is a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, the American 
Council on Education, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and 
Colleges, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, the North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities, and the 
Cooperating Raleigh Colleges. 

ACCREDITATION 

North Carolina State University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools (1 866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: Telephone number (404) 679-4501 to award the doctoral, 
master's, baccalaureate, and associate's degrees. 



In addition, many of the University's professional programs and departments are accredited by national professional 
associations, including: 

Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology 1992 
Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (Environmental Engineering) 1994 

Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (Industrial Engineering) 1995 

American Animal Hospital Association 1995 

American Association for Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care 1997 

American Chemical Society 1994 

American Psychological Association 1995 

American Veterinary Medical Association 1998 

Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs 1994 

Computing Sciences Accreditation Board 1992 

Council on Social Work Education 1995 

Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board 1993 

National Architectural Board 1995 

National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration 1993 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 1996 

National Recreation and Park Association 1997 

Society of American Foresters 1994 

Society of Wood Science and Technology 1 994 

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY 

NC State is committed to equality of educational opportunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students, or 
employees based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability. Moreover, NC State University is open to 
people of all races and actively seeks to promote racial integration by recruiting and enrolling a larger number of black 
students. 

NC State University is dedicated to equality of opportunity within its community. Accordingly, NC State University does not 
practice or condone discrimination, in any form, against students, employees, or applicants on the grounds of race, color, 
national origin, religion, sex. age, or disability. 

NC State University commits itself to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of those characteristics. 

NC State University supports the protections available to members of its community under all applicable Federal laws, 
including Titles VI and Vll of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Equal Pay 
and Age Discrimination in Employment Acts, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Vietnam Veteran's 
Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, Executive Order 1 1246, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. 

For information concerning the nondiscrimination policy, contact: 

Joanne Woodard Phone: (919) 515-4559 or 515-3148 

Assistant Provost for Equal Opportunity TTY: (919)515-9617 

304 Holladay Hall, Box 7930 e-mail: Joanne_Woodard@ncsu.edu 

NC State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7530 

Further information concerning the following topics, contact the offices listed below: 

Undergraduate Admissions Academic Programs, Office of the Provost 

ll2PeeleHall 206 Holladay Hall 

Box 7 103 Box 7526 

NC State University NC State University 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7 1 03 Raleigh, NC 27695 

Phone:(919)515-2434 Phone:(919)515-2194 

E-mail: Undergrad_Admissions@ncsu.edu E-mail: academic@ncsu.edu 



NC STATE UNIVERSITY 
ADMINISTRATION AND OFFICES 

OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR 

Marye Anne Fox, Chancellor 

Clare M. Kristofco, Senior Assistant to the Chancellor 

Hank Fiumara, Director, University Improvement Programs 

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST AND VICE CHANCELLOR 

Kermit Hall, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

C. Frank Abrams Jr., Senior Associate Provost for Academic Affairs 

William C. Grant, Associate Provost and Facilitator of African-American Affairs 

Rebecca Leonard, Assistant Provost and Facilitator of Gender Equity 

Bruce I. Mallette, Assistant Provost for Administration 

Joanne G. Woodard, Assistant Provost for Equal Opportunity 

George R. Dixon, Vice Provost for Enrollment Management and Services and Director of Admissions 

Sondra L. Kirsch, Vice Provost, Continuing Studies 

Sam Averitt, Interim Vice Provost, Information Technology 

Carl Malstrom, Assistant Vice Provost for Information Technology 

Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director, NCSU Libraries 

Karin L. Wolfe, Director of Office of Academic Personnel Services 

COMPUTING CENTER 

Sam Averitt, Director of Computing Services 

ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT AND SERVICES 

George R.Dixon, Vice Provost for Enrollment Management and Services and Director of Admissions 

Financial Aid 

Julia R. Mallette, Director 

Registration and Records 

Martha M. Welch, Registrar 

Undergraduate Admissions 

George R. Dixon, Vice Provost for Enrollment Management and Services and Director of Admissions 

NCSU LIBRARIES 

Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries 

UNIVERSITY PLANNING AND ANALYSIS 

Karen P. Helm, Director 

LEGAL AFFAIRS 

Mary Elizabeth Kurz, General Counsel 

DIVISION OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

James A. Anderson, Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Studies 

Thomas E. H. Conway, Associate Dean 

Jo Allen, Assistant Dean 

Academic Support Program for Student Athletes 

Philip Moses, Director 

Co-operative Education 

Arnold Bell, Director 

First Year College 

Thomas Conway, Director 

Barbara A. Soloman, Associate Director for Advising 

Janice E. Odom, Associate Director for Partnerships and Programming 

New Student Orientation Program 

Roger A.E. Callanan, Director 

Transition Program 

Ron L. Mimms, Director 



Undergraduate Studies Tutorial Center 

Ann F. Mann, Director 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Debra W. Stewart. Dean 

Robert S Sowell, Associate Dean 

Margaret F. King, Associate Dean 

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Thomas H. Stafford Jr., T/ce Chancellor 

Charles A. Haywood, Associate Vice Chancellor 

Evel>n Q. Reiman, Associate Vice Chancellor 

Arthur L. White, Associate Vice Chancellor 

Tim R. Luckadoo, Associate to the Vice Chancellor for University Housing & Greek Life 

N. Alexander Miller, III, Associate to the Vice Chancellor for Arts Programs 

Judy C. Peel. Head . Department of Physical Education 

Lisa P. Zapata, Assistant to the Vice Chancellor 

Gerald G. Hawkins, Director, Cald^vll-Fellows Program 

Center for Student Leadership, Ethics and Public Service 

Janey Musgrave. Director 

Center Stage/Arts Outreach 

Sharon H. Moore. Director 

Counseling Center 

M Lee Salter, Director 

Crafts Center 

James V. Pressley, Director 

Dance Program 

Robin Harris Taylor, Director 

Disability Services for Students 

Patricia Smith. Coordinator 

Educational Talent Search 

Marsha Boyd Pharr, Director 

Gallery of Art and Design 

Charlone V. Brown, Director 

Greek Life 

Melinda B. Sopher, Director 

Merit Awards and Special Scholarships 

Patricia J. Lee, Director 

Music Department 

Robert B. Petters, Director 

Physical Education Department 

Judy C. Peele, Head 

ROTC Units 

Air Force: Robert Ostrander, Commander 

Army: David Cannon, Commander 

Navy & Marine Corps: Nicholas Taylor, Officer in Charge 
Student Conduct, Office of 
Paul Cousins, Director 
Student Activities Office 
Deborah C. Luckadoo, Director 
Frances Graham, Coordinator, Women's Center 
Student Development 
Robert Bryan, Director 

Lathan Turner, Coordinator, African-American Student Affairs 
Fran Russ* Coordinator, Student Media Advising 
Student Health Service 
Jerry Barker, Director 

Marianne Tumbull, Coordinator, Health Promotion 
Study Abroad 
Ingrid Schmidt, Director 



University Career Center 

Walter Jones, Director 

University Dining 

Arthur L. White, Associate Vice Chancellor 

University Housing 

Tim Luckadoo, Associate to the Vice Chancellor for University Housing & Greek Life 

University Scholars Program 

N. Alexander Miller, Director 

University Student Centers 

Donald Patty, Director, Business and Computer Planning 

University Theatre 

John Mcllwee, Director 

Upward Bound 

Marcia Boyd Pharr, Director 

Upward Bound Praise 

Willie Edmonds, Interim Director 

DIVISION OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

George Worsley, Vice Chancellor 

Kathryn S. Hart, Treasurer 

Stephen Keto, Associate Vice Chancellor, Finance and Information Systems 

Charles D. Leffler, Associate Vice Chancellor for Facilities 

Jeff Mann, Associate Vice Chancellor, Business and Interim Director for Human Resources 

Claude E. McKinney, Centennial Campus Coordinator 

Dennis Smith, Manager, Internal Audit 

Administrative Computing Services 

Ronald J. Melbourne, Director 

Benefits 

David Williamson, Director 

Bookstores 

Richard A. Hayes, Director 

Budget Office 

Marion Neal, Director 

Central Stores 

Judith D. Willis, Manager 

Construction Management 

Carol Woodyard, Director 

Contracts and Grants 

Earl N. Pulliam, Director 

Employee Relations and Training Services 

Dianne Sortini, Director 

Employment and Compensation 

Terree Yardley, Director 

Environmental Health and Safety 

David Ranier, Director 

Facilities Operations 

Jack Colby, Director 

Facilities Planning and Design 

Miriam D. Tripp, Director 

Foundations Accounting and Investments 

Putney Jones, Director 

Insurance and Risk Management 

Anne Hitchcock, Director 

Network and Client Services 

Gwen Hazelhurst, Director 

Physical Plant 

James R. Vespi, Director 

Public Safety 

Ralph L. Harper, Director 

Purchasing 

Robert Wood, Director 



Real Estate 

Howard W. Harrell, Director 
Student Accounts 
Craig Moore. Director 
Telecommunications 
Jennifer Van Horn. Director 
Transportation 
Cath> Reeve. Director 
University Accounting OfTice 
Paula Tate, Controller 
University Architect 
Edwin F. Harris 
University Graphics 
Catherine Armitage. Director 
University Payroll Office 
Brian Simet. Director 

OFFICE OF RESEARCH, OUTREACH AND EXTENSION 

Charles G. Moreland, Vice Chancellor 

June M Broiherton, Associate Vice Chancellor for University Extension 

W. Mark Crow ell. Associate Vice Chancellor. Technology Transfer and Industry Research 

Russ Lea, Assistant Vice Chancellor. Research 

John J. CNcil. Assistant Vice Chancellor. Research Development 

UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT 

JefT McNeill. Vice Chancellor 

Advancement Services 

Paul Eberle. Associate Vice Chancellor 

Alumni Relations 

Jim Bass. Associate Vice Chancellor 

ATHLETICS 

Les Robinson, Director 

FACULTY SENATE 

Frederick Corbin, Chair 

HONORS COUNCIL 

John N. Wall, Director 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES 

James L. Oblinger, Dean and Executive Director for Agricultural Programs 
George T. Barthalmus, Associate Dean and Director for Academic Programs 
Jon F. Ort. Associate Dean. Cooperative Extension Service 
Johnny C. Wynne, Associate Dean and Director. Agricultural Research Service 
Katie Perry, Assistant Dean for Administration 
R. Mark Fleming, Assistant to Dean 
L. George Wilson, Coordinator of International Programs 

John C. Comwell. Assistant Director of Academic Programs. Director of Agricultural Institute 
Barbara M. Kirby. Assistant Director of Academic Programs 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

Marvin J. Malecha, Dean 

John Tector, Associate Dean. Undergraduate Studies and Academic Affairs 

Martha Scotford, Associate Dean. Graduate Studies. Research. Outreach and Extension 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Joan J. Michael. Dean 

John R. Kolb, Associate Dean. Academic Affairs 

Edwin R. Gerler, Associate Dean. Research and External Affairs 

Anona P. Smith, Assistant Dean, Student Services 



10 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Nino A. Masnari, Dean 

Sarah A. Rajala, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

John G. GiUigan, Associate Dean, Research and Graduate Programs 

Thomas K. Miller, Associate Dean, Distance Education and Information Technology 

Gordon K. Lee, Assistant Dean, Research Programs 

Tony L. Mitchell, Assistant Dean, Engineering Student Services 

Richard L. Porter, Assistant Dean, Academic Affairs 

COLLEGE OF FOREST RESOURCES 

Larry W. Tombaugh, Dean 

J. Douglas Wellman, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

J. B. Jett, Associate Dean, Research 

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Margaret A. Zahn, Dean 

M. Mohan Sawhney, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

Mathew T. Zingraff, Associate Dean, Research 

Gail W. O'Brien, Associate Dean, Graduate Programs 

Edward T. Funkhouser, Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Academic Affairs 

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT 

Jon W. Bartley, Interim Dean 

Gilroy J. Zuckerman, Interim Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Jerry L. Whitten, Dean 

Daniel L. Solomon, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

Raymond E. Pomes, Associate Dean, Research 

COLLEGE OF TEXTILES 

Robert A. Bamhardt, Dean 

Charles D. Livengood, Associate Dean, Academic Programs: Director, Graduate Programs 

Philip R. Dail, Coordinator, Undergraduate Advising 

David R. Buchanan, Associate Dean, Extension and Applied Research 

Perry Grady, Associate Dean, Special Projects 

Brenda Allen, Coordinator, Diversity Programs 

C. L. Barton, Assistant to the Dean, Student Services and Placement 

T. M. Langley, Student Services Manager 

S. T. Wiener, Librarian, Burlington Textiles Library 

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Oscar J. Fletcher, Dean 

David G. Bristol, Associate Dean and Director, Academic Affairs 

Neil Olson, Associate Dean and Director, Graduate Studies and Research 

David J. De Young, Associate Dean and Director, Veterinary Services 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1999 FALL SEMESTER 

August 16 Monday First day of classes 

September 6 Monday Holiday (Labor Day) 

October 11-12 Mon.-Tues. Fall Break 

October 13 Wednesday Classes resume at 8:05 a.m.; 8:35 a.m. Centennial Campus 

November 24 Wednesday Thanksgiving vacation begins at 10:20 p.m. 

November 25-26 Thurs.-Fri. Thanksgiving Holidays 

November 29 Monday Classes resume at 8:05 a.m.; 8:35 a.m. Centennial Campus 

December 3 Friday Last day of classes 

December 6-14 Mon.-Tues. Final examinations 

December 15 Wednesday Fall Graduation Exercise 



2000 SPRING SEMESTER 



January 

January 

January 

March 

March 

March 

April 

April 

May 

May 

May 



10 

17 

18 

10 

13-17 

20 

19-20 

21 

5 

8-16 

20 



Monday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Friday 

Mon.-Fri. 

Monday 

Wed.-Thurs. 

Friday 

Friday 

Mon.-Tues. 

Saturday 



First day of classes 

Holiday (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day) 

No classes 

Spring vacation begins at 10:20 p.m. 

Spring Break 

Classes resume at 8:05; 8:35 a.m. Centennial Campus 

No classes 

Holiday (Good Friday) 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 

Spring Commencement 



2000 FIRST SUMMER SESSION 



May 
May 
June 
June 
June 



24 
25 
27 
28 
29-30 



Wednesday 

Thursday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Mon-Tues. 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of instructor 

Last day of classes 

Reading Day 

Final examinations 



2000 SECOND SUMMER SESSION 



July 
August 
August 
August 



9 
10-11 



Wednesday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Wed.-Thurs. 



First day of classes 
Last day of classes 
Reading Day 
Final examinations 



2000 FALL SEMESTER 

August 21 Monday First day of classes 

September 4 Monday Holiday (Labor Day) 

October 14 Friday Fall vacation begins at 10:20 p.m. 

October 16-17 Mon.-Tues. Fall vacation 

October 1 8 Wednesday Classes resume at 8:05 a.m. (8:35 a.m. Centennial Campus) 

November 22 Wednesday Thanksgiving vacation begins at 10:20 p.m. 

November 23-24 Thurs.-Fri. Thanksgiving Holiday 

November 27 Monday Classes resume at 8:05 a.m. (8:35 a.m. Centennial Campus) 

December 8 Friday Last day of classes 

December 11-19 Mon.-Tues. Final Examinations 

December 20 Wednesday Fall Graduation Exercise 

Note: This calendar is subject lo periodic review and revision. Please consult the University Registrar to detemiiie of changes have been made: 
(919)515-2576. 



12 



ACADEMIC FIELDS OF STUDY AND DEGREES 

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

agricultural business management; agricultural and environmental technology, agricultural and extension education; 
agronomy; animal science; applied sociology ; biochemistry; biological engineering; biological sciences; botany; 
environmental sciences; fisheries and wildlife sciences; food science; horticultural science; microbiology; natural 
resources; poultry science; zoology. 
Pre-professional Programs - pre-dental, pre-medical, pre-optometry and pre-veterinary 

School of Design 

architecture (fifth year program); environmental design in architecture; art and design; industrial design; graphic 
design; landscape architecture 

College of Education and Psychology 

education, general studies; health occupations education; business and marketing education; 
mathematics education; middle grades education; psychology ; science education; technology education. 

College of Engineering 

aerospace engineering; biological engineering; chemical engineering; civil engineering; computer engineering; 
computer science; construction engineering and management; electrical engineering; engineering; environmental 
engineering; industrial engineering; industrial engineering; furniture manufacturing; materials science and 
engineering; mechanical engineering; nuclear engineering; textile engineering. 

College of Forest Resources 

environmental sciences; forest management; natural resources; parks, recreation, and tourism management; pulp and 
paper science and technology; wood products 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

arts applications; communication; English; English education option; French; French education option; history; 
multidisciplinary studies; philosophy; political science; religious studies; social studies education options: sociology; 
Spanish; Spanish education option; social work. 

College of Management 

accounting; business management; economics 
College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

chemistry; environmental sciences; geology; mathematics; meteorology; natural resources; physics; statistics 
College of Textiles 

textile chemistry; textile engineering; textile and apparel management; textile technology. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Pre-Law Advising Program. Law schools neither prescribe nor recommend a particular undergraduate curriculum for 
prospective candidates. A student may prepare for law school by a careful use of electives within any of the baccalaureate 
curricula offered by the nine undergraduate colleges and schools. The pre-law adviser for the University assists any student 
with an interest in law with selection of appropriate electives and concentrations. The pre-law adviser also works with the 
Pre-Law Students' Association (PLSA), which is open to all interested students. The PLSA invites outside speakers to make 
presentations about law schools and careers in the law. In addition, the group has made at least one visit per year to local law 
schools where the students can attend classes and visit with directors of admissions. At this time, the Pre-Law Advising 

13 



Program is administratively housed within the Division of Undergraduate Studies. For further information, consult Mary A. 
Tetro in the Pre-Law Advising Office. 57 Tucker Hall, (919) 515-5830. 

Pre-Medicine, Pre-Dentistr>, and Pre-Optometry Programs. Health professional schools seek bright, broadly educated 
students from any four->ear undergraduate curriculum offered at NC State University. Thus, students should choose a 
departmental major which suits their interests and talents and which would prepare them for an alternative career should they 
not be accepted into one of the professional schools. 

The program of study should include the minimal English, science and mathematics courses listed under the heading 
Pre-Medical Sciences . Further, the student should seek: 

• courses that develop reading, writing and critical thinking skills, 

• opportunities in undergraduate research and 

• experience in hospitals, clinics, dental and optometry offices or nursing homes. 

The University Preprofessional Health Sciences Review Committee assists students in preparing applications and in 
providing evaluations to professional schools. For further information, consult Professor John Roberts, committee chairman 
or the program associate, Nancy Cochran (919) 515-3293. Detailed preprofessional information may be viewed on the 
World Wide Web at: http://www2.ncsu.edu/ncsu/cals/pre_proff/booklet/sa2mdos.index.html 

PreVeterinary Program This area of smdy is a non-degree option offered by the College of Agricultiu^ and Life Sciences, 
this option is available to students majoring in animal science, poultry science, zoology, or biological sciences as well as in 
many other science curricula, such as biochemistry or chemistry. If a student is accepted to veterinary medical school before 
completion of their undergraduate degree, some course credits may be transferable from the veterinary program toward 
completion of the Bachelor of Science degree. Arrangements for this procedure should be made with the degree granting 
school or department prior to entering veterinary college. For ftjrther information, contact the Academic Programs Office of 
the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, (919) 515-2614 or the Admissions Office for Veterinary Students of the 
College of Veterinary Medicine, (919) 513-6205, for general information concerning admission to the Doctor of Veterinary 
Medicine programs at NC State. 



UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

Some departments at NC State offer undergraduate minors for students wishing a systematic program of study in an area 
outside their major. All minors require at least 1 5 credit hours and may be either departmental or interdepartmental. Courses 
within the minor program may be used to satisfy any of the general requirements, including free electives, of a major 
curriculum. Minors are completely optional, the only requirement being that a student may not minor in the same discipline 
as their major. Students pursuing a minor must consult with a minor adviser on a plan of work and must file a copy of this 
plan with their major adviser at least one semester before graduation. Satisfactory completion of the minor will be noted on 
the final transcript following graduation. 



Accounting 

Africana Studies 

Agricultural Business Management 

Agricultural and Environmental Technology 

Animal Science 

Anthropology 

Apparel Technology 

Applied Sociology 

Arts Studies 

Biological Sciences 

Botany 

Business Management 

Chemical Engineering 

Chinese Studies 

Classical Greek 

Classical Studies 

Cognitive Science 

Computer Programming 

Crop Science 

Design 

Design Studies 

Economics 

English 



Entomology 

Environmental Science 

Film Studies 

Fimess Leadership 

Food Science 

Forest Management 

French 

Furniture Manufacturing 

Genetics 

Geology 

German 

Graphic Communications 

History 

Horticultural Science 

Industrial Engineering 

International Studies 

Italian Studies 

Japanese 

Japan Studies 

Journalism 

Linguistics 

Materials Science and Engineering 

Mathematics 



Meteorology 

Microbiology 

Military Studies 

Music 

Nutrition 

Outdoor Leadership 

Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management 

Philosophy 

Physical Education (Coaching Emphasis) 

Physics 

Political Science 

Poultry Science 

Psychology 

Pulp and Paper Technology 

Religious Studies 

Russian Studies 



Science, Technology, and Society 

Social Work 

Sociology 

Soil Science 

Spanish 

Statistics 

Technical and Scientific Communication 

Technology Education 

Textile Chemistry 

Textile Technology 

Textile and Apparel Management 

Theater 

Women's Studies 

Wood Products 

World Literature 

Zoology 



AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 

Admission to this two-year program requires the completion of an North Carolina State University Undergraduate 
Admissions application, a high school diploma or equivalent, and one letter of recommendation from a responsible citizen, 
not a relative, attesting to the prospective student's integrity and character. The program does not carry college credit. An 
Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded. Fields of study are: 

Agribusiness Management 

Agricultural Pest Control 

Field Crops Technology 

Food Processing, Distribution, and Service 

General Agriculture 

Livestock Management and Technology (General Livestock, Poultry, and Swine Options) 

Ornamentals and Landscape Technology 

Turfgrass Management 

GRADUATE DEGREES 

Consult the Graduate Catalog or the Graduate School for information on graduate programs and admissions procedures: 
Graduate School, 103 Peele Hall, Box 7102, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7102, (919) 515-2872. 



ARTS STUDIES 

NC State offers a rich variety of courses in the history, analysis, and production of the arts - dance, fihn, music, theater, 
visual arts. Many of these courses are open to students without prerequisite, and are offered by 13 departments in four 
different colleges of the university. 

In addition to these courses, most of which focus on a single art form, the Division of Multidisciplinary Studies offers special 
topics courses (MDS 295, 494, 495) each of which deals with several arts media or with the arts in connection with science 
and technology; information about these courses, which change each year, is available from the Office of Multidisciplinary 
Studies. 

For students who want to concentrate in Arts Studies, a major in Arts Applications is available. It is administered by the 
Division of Multidisciplinary Studies in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. In addition, there are minors in Arts 
Studies, Music, Theatre, Design and Film Studies. 

Opportunities for students to participate in arts activities include many instrumental and choral organizations, student 
productions in Thompson Theater, craft instruction and facilities in the Craft Center, and the exhibitions of the Visual Arts 
Program. These activities, many of which are integrated with academic courses. See "Student Services" in this section of the 
catalog. 



15 



HONORS AND SCHOLARS PROGRAMS 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

"Man's mind stretched to a new idea, never goes back to its original dimension" 
- Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

Holmes was right, of course, and the University Scholars Program (USP) of North Carolina State University accepts this 
dictum as a challenge: To provide promising, academically talented students with a variety of mind-stretching and unique 
educational experiences, both in and outside of the classroom, and to encourage these outstanding students to perform at the 
highest level of achievement of which they are capable. 

Co-sponsored by University Housing in the Division of Student Affairs, the First Year College, the School of Design and the 
Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Education and Psychology, Engineering, Forest Resources. Humanities and Social 
Sciences. Management. Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and Textiles, the USP combines special academic offerings 
with a series of cocurricular and extracurricular opportunities. To successfully complete the USP a student must graduate 
with an overall Grade Point Average of at least 3.250, complete a minimum of 21 hours of Honors/Scholars courses with an 
"Honors GPA" of at least 3.000, and satisfactorily participate in the USP Forum Series. 

Students in the USP may enroll in special Honors or Scholars sections of basic courses in the humanities and social sciences, 
mathematics and natural sciences. These sections are deliberately kept small and are taught by instructors known for their 
excellence in teaching. All of these classes fulfill requirements for graduation from NC State, thus students are not required 
to take additional courses in order to participate in the USP. To ensure that University Scholars are able to register for their 
required Scholars Forum, Honors and Scholars courses, and regular, non-Scholars sections of courses, USP participants 
receive "Scholars Advanced Scheduling" privileges. 

Academic work in the Scholars Program is complemented and enriched by a series of special events, called the Scholars 
Forum. These weekly activities are intended to broaden each student's personal, professional, and cultural horizons. Forum 
events may include conversations with distinguished faculty members, addresses by major public figures, debates and 
discussions on significant public issues, and visits to museums and historic sites. They may also include introductions to 
cultural activities, viewing of significant films, and explorations of opportunities open to students for personal growth and 
foreign study. 

University Scholars are also expected to attend cultural events on the NC State campus and in the Raleigh community. 
Tickets for many of these events are provided as part of the program. Scholars are also provided the opportunity to attend a 
range of international films and events, both on campus and at the North Carolina Museum of Art. Additionally, the Scholars 
Council, a body made up of student representatives from each NC State school and college, plans a variety of social activities 
and special trips for University Scholars, and arranges for USP students to participate in worthwhile community service 
projects. 

To encourage the development of close working relationships and friendships among participants in the USP, Scholars are 
invited and encouraged to live in the same residence hall, Sullivan, located on West Campus. To assist and communicate 
effectively with these students, the USP office is also located in Sullivan Residence Hall. Scholars are guaranteed housing on 
campus as long as they remain active in the USP. 

Finally, through the University Scholars Program, NC State is a member and participates in the activities of the North 
Carolina Honors Association, the Southern Regional Honors Council and the National Collegiate Honors Council. 

For more information concerning the USP, contact: University Scholars Program, Box 73 16, NCSU, Raleigh, NC 27695- 
7316, Phone: (919) 515-2353, Fax: (919) 515-7168; e-mail: University_Scholars@ncsu.edu 

HONORS PROGRAMS 

Honors programs are offered by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Forest Resources, and Textiles and by most 
departments in the Colleges of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and Humanities and Social Sciences. Detailed 
descriptions of the individual honors programs are available in the listings of the relevant college or department. Honors 
participants benefit from a more individualized and rigorous academic program in their major area of interest. A minimum of 
9 credit hours in course work at the 300 level or above drawn from at least two of the three following categories is required: 
special courses for honors students, advanced (graduate) courses, and independent studies. To successfully complete the 
program, students must finish the designated course work and achieve an overall grade point average of at least 3.250. 

Students who complete an honors program are recognized by having an "H" beside their names in the commencement 
program, the phrase "Completed Honors Program in (college, department or major)" on their permanent transcripts, and their 
names in the Honors Convocation program. 

16 



Minimum admission requirement: 3.250 overall GPA and either a 3.250 major GPA after at least 9 hours of course work 
required for the major or other course work approved by the major department or the recommendation of the faculty. 
Many of the individual programs have higher admission requirements. Students who believe they are eligible and are 
interested in more information about honors program opportunities should contact the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
of their college or school or the Honors Director of their department or the Director of the University Honors Council. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS FOR ENTERING FRESHMEN 

NC State offers a competitive scholarship program for entering freshmen to recognize and to encourage exceptional academic 
ability and achievement. Graduating seniors of good character and leadership potential who have excelled in their high school 
academic and extracurricular endeavors may apply for a large number of merit award opportunities at the University. 
Financial need is not a consideration in the selection of recipients for these merit scholarships. 

Each year the office of Merit Awards and Special Scholarships conducts a nationwide competition for approximately 80 
universitywide scholarships (available to students entering any academic major). A number of other scholarships are also 
offered through individual colleges and departments. Completion of the John T. Caldwell Scholarship application packet, 
which consists of the student's application as well as other supporting documents, assures consideration for the 80 university- 
wide scholarships, including the prestigious John T. Caldwell Alumni Scholarship. It also provides information to the 
various Colleges for their curriculum-specific scholarships. 

In order to be considered for both university- wide and college-based scholarships, applicants need only submit the NC State 
Undergraduate Admissions Application by November 15, 1999, unlike previous years when a separate merit scholarship 
application was also required. 

Based upon the academic strength of the November 15 applicant pool, a supplemental merit scholarship form will be sent to a 
select group of applicants planning to enter each of the University's undergraduate colleges. This supplemental scholarship 
form cannot be requested directly. 

The John T. Caldwell Alumni Scholarship is sponsored by the NC State Alumni Association. Caldwell Scholarships, 
valued at $4,000/year (up to $18,000 for four years) for instate recipients and $7,500/year (up to $32,000 for four years) for 
out of state recipients, are offered each year. This excellent scholarship seeks students who demonstrate both academic 
excellence and strong leadership potential. It includes stipends for valuable personal enrichment and internship experiences. 

Yearly renewal of the Caldwell and the other Universitywide renewable awards assumes the maintenance of a 3.000 grade 
point average once a recipient is engaged in fulltime course work at the University. 

Many other scholarships, ranging from $2,000 freshmen year awards up to other renewable awards, such as the Caldwells are 
available in each year's competition. 

Again, the application or materials will be mailed to the student after he/she has applied for admission if his/her academic 
credentials are competitive for the selected pool. 

The Office of Merit Awards and Special Scholarships, NCSU, 21 19 Pullen Hall, Box 7342, Raleigh, NC 27695-7342 

Telephone inquiries are welcome: (919) 515-3671 

CURRICULUM-SPECIFIC FRESHMAN MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS 

There are a number of merit scholarships for students entering a particular college or major. The number and value of these 
awards vary greatly throughout the different colleges. The individual college Dean's Office is the best place to inquire for 
additional information on available awards. 

Most of the college-sponsored scholarships have a March 15 date for notification of scholarship decisions — most programs 
do not request that a special application be filed, just that an undergraduate admissions application with all supporting 
documents be filed by November 15. 

COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENTAL SCHOLARSHIPS FOR CONTINUING STUDENTS 

A number of scholarships based upon academic achievement are administered directly through some of the academic 
departments for students engaged in fulltime course work at the University (see the "Colleges, Departments, and Programs of 
Study" section of this catalog). A continuing student should contact the college/department of his or her academic major for 
information about specific scholarship opportunities that do not require the filing of financial information. 

17 



SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

EVENING UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers courses toward complete undergraduate degree programs during the 
evening hours for adult part-time students. Sufficient courses are generally offered in the evening hours to complete majors in 
communication-public and interpersonal option, communication-public relations option, English, English-rhetoric, writing 
and language option, history, multidisciplinary studies, political science, sociology, and criminal justice option in political 
science or sociology. For more information, contact the Coordinator of Evening Programs, College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences, Box 8101. NC State, Raleigh, NC 27695-8101, (919) 515-3638. 

NONDEGREE CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

Nondegree certificate programs are prescribed sets of regular academic courses which offer limited but structured continuing 
education opportunities. They are designed expressly for Lifelong Education students. Students enrolled in undergraduate or 
graduate degree programs at NC State are not eligible to participate simultaneously in these certificate programs. Satisfactory 
completion of the prescribed courses is recognized by the issuing of a certificate from the department or college that offers 
that program. 

Certificate programs are currently offered by the following academic units: Department of Adult and Community College 
Education - Studies in Gerontology (PBS students only) and Training and Development (PBS students only); Department 
of Communication - Human Communication, with track options in Public and Interpersonal Communication, 
Communication Disorders, Mass Communication, Public Relations, and Theatre; Department of Computer Science - 
Computer Programming (PBS students only); Department of English - Professional Writing; Department of Political 
Science and Public Administration - Management Development (PBS students only) with program areas such as Adult and 
Community College Administration, Data Management, Financial Management, Human Resources Management. 
Management Control Systems, Public Affairs, Urban Administration, Program Evaluation, Administration of Justice, 
Recreation Resources Management, and Association/Non-profit Management; and the College of Textiles - Textiles with 
subject areas including Apparel f^roduction. Dyeing and Finishing, Fabric Production, Textile Fibers and Polymers, Fiber 
Science for Textile Conservators, Textile Administration, Textile Fundamentals, and Yam Manufacturing. 

For information concerning enrollment requirements and prescribed courses for a particular certificate program, consult the 
department or college offering that program or the Office of Adult Credit Programs & Summer Sessions, (919) 515-2265. 

SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTION 

Supplemental Instruction (SI) is offered to students in most sections of freshman and sophomore chemistry and selected 
sections of biology, computer science, mathematics and physics. SI sessions are attended voluntarily by students with a wide 
range of academic backgrounds and aptitudes. They are open to all students who want to improve their understanding of the 
course material. Three or four sessions are offered at various times each week, usually during the late afternoon and early 
evening. 

SI sessions give students a chance to get together with peers to compare notes, to discuss concepts, to work problems, and to 
develop strategies for studying the material. The sessions are led by trained university tutors called SI leaders. Leaders are 
usually undergraduate students who previously excelled in the course and who have been selected for their outstanding 
communication abilities. The leaders attend class, take notes, and do homework assignments in preparation for the SI 
sessions. 

During the semester, students may attend as many SI sessions as they wish. Session attendance is recorded for use in data 
analysis and program improvement. The data reveals a consistent record of higher grades and lower drop-out rates for 
students who regularly attend. Grades also steadily improve with increased SI attendance. Students attending SI at least once 
a week average a whole letter grade higher than students who do not attend. 

For more information, contact the Undergraduate Studies Tutorial Center, 515-3163. 

THE PEER MENTOR PROGRAM 

The Peer Mentor Program is a student peer-helper program in which academically talented African- American upperclassmen 
serve as "mentors" to freshmen African-American students. The program stresses the mentoring process as a positive factor 
in the successful recruitment, advancement, and graduation of African- American students at this University. The Peer Mentor 
Program assists the freshmen in making a successful transition to campus life by providing them with a supportive contact 
person who acts as a sounding board for personal adjustment concerns; interprets University policies and procedures; makes 
proper referrals to appropriate University services; and suggests to freshmen various strategies for academic, emotional, and 

18 



social success at NC State. Moreover, an integral component of the program is a focus on cultural awareness and identity as a 
means of helping African- American peer mentors and freshmen to positively affirm their skills and capabilities. 

All incoming African-American freshmen are assigned a peer mentor prior to their arrival on campus in the fall. Whenever 
possible, the freshmen are paired with upperclassmen who are in the same major or college. Peer mentors are trained in 
"helping skills" and possess a working knowledge of the campus. Thus, they play a significant role in fostering in the 
freshman student a positive self-esteem and an appreciation of the potential benefits and rewards of college life. 

COOPERATING RALEIGH COLLEGES 

The Cooperating Raleigh Colleges (CRC) is a voluntary organization comprised of NC State, Meredith College, Peace 
College, St. Augustine's College, St. Mary's College, and Shaw University for the purpose of developing and conducting 
cooperative educational activities. The organization provides the opportunity for students to enroll at another institution for a 
course or courses not offered on their home campus. Other activities include a cooperative library arrangement, joint student 
activities, and faculty cooperation and interchange. 

Any NC State undergraduate degree student who is enrolled in at least eight credit hours on the NC State campus may take a 
course at another Raleigh college during a fall or spring semester (except that men may not enroll in courses at Peace 
College) provided that (a) the course is not taught on the NC State campus and (b) the adviser and dean consider the course 
educationally desirable. 

Students may not register for more than a total of two courses in any semester at other CRC colleges. Under extenuating 
circumstances, exceptions for an additional course registration may be approved by the requesting student's school dean. 

Home campus students have first priority in class assignments. Courses taken at other institutions may be used as free 
electives and as alternatives to restricted electives, if so approved by the student's adviser and dean. Credits earned in this 
manner may apply toward ftilfilling graduation requirements, but grades from other CRC institutions are not used in 
computing a student's NC State grade point average. Under this agreement, regular tuition and fees are paid to NC State. 
Certain special fees may be required for special courses at other colleges, and the student is responsible for paying such fees. 
During the summer, there is no interinstitutional program with local colleges. A student desiring to take a summer course 
must register directly with the institution offering the course. 

Note: Lifelong Education students may not register for courses as interinstitutional students. 

NATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM 

NC State is one of over 155 colleges and universities in the United States belonging to the National Student Exchange 
Program. Each year an opportunity is provided for NC State students to study at one of the other participating schools and 
still pay the same tuition and fees they pay at NC State, thus avoiding the red tape normally associated with a change of 
school. Students returning from exchange reflect an increased feeling of independence, self reliance and self confidence, and 
a better appreciation of home region, family and home campus. A major impact of the exchange year has been an increased 
awareness and appreciation for the vast differences in ideas and values found in different geographic locations. Eligible 
students must be an undergraduate with a 2.500 grade point average or better and be selected by a screening committee. 
Preference is given to North Carolina residents. For ftirther information contact the National Student Exchange Office in 
2120 Pullen Hall, (919) 515-3499. 

NC STATE FELLOWS PROGRAM 

NC State offers a self development experience known as the NC State Fellows Program. The program is designed to assist 
outstanding, talented students to develop their leadership potential at an accelerated pace, and to accomplish this in ways not 
usually afforded by the University. Each year approximately 30 new freshmen are selected to participate in the program as 
Fellows. The program seeks to identify students of exceptional ability and motivation and to encourage their development as 
potential leaders for business, governmental, educational and other professional communities. The program attempts to fulfill 
its goal by providing training and developmental opportunities. 



19 



NC STATE INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

About 1 ,200 international students from approximately 87 countries attend the University and enrich the campus and 
community. The International Student Office assists these students with immigration and passport maners, currency permits, 
and medical, personal, and social concerns. 

International applicants are carefully screened for evidence of English language proficiency, adequate fmances, and academic 
credentials indicating excellent potential for success. The minimum TOEFL requirement for admission consideration to NC 
State IS 550 with scores of at least 50 on mo sections and no score lower than 45. The Lifelong Education Student category 
is not available to persons on temporary visas. The University has authority to issue Forms 120 for Fl visas and Forms IAP66 
for JI visas to fully qualified individuals. 

An orientation program for new international students is conducted during the week preceding the fall and spring semesters. 

International students are required to purchase the University student insurance policy or provide proof of agency sponsor 
coverage. Special courses in English for Foreign Students (FLE) are required for those whose scores on the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are sufficiently high for admission but who need further instruction to perform well 
academically. 

The International Student Committee of the Union Activities Board includes international students from across campus, 
offering and promoting programs of cultural enrichment in an atmosphere of mutual respect and cooperation for members of 
the campus community from all cultures. Program highlights include International Nights, featuring ethnic meals and 
entertainment, and Global Speak, a program for conversation partners. 

Interested students should contact the Student Center Activities Office, 5 1 5-245 1 , or the Union Activities Board, 5 1 5-59 1 8. 

SUMMER INSTITUTE IN ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES 

The Summer Institute in English for Speakers of Other Languages is a five-week, intensive English language program for 
students from other countries. It is especially good for students who intend to pursue university studies or specialized training 
programs in the United States in the fall. The institute, which is jointly sponsored by the Department of Foreign Languages 
and Literatures and the Division of Continuing Education, is held from early July to early August each summer. It is designed 
to provide students with intensive instruction and practice in the use of the English language. Emphasis is on developing 
integrated oral and written skills in English. 

The institute also offers orientation to American life and institutions to give students insight into life in the United States and 
to help them to adjust to the new environment. There are films, lectures by guest speakers, and field trips on weekends to 
places of historic, cultural, and scenic interest. 

Prospective students usually have studied English and have some experience with spoken English prior to enrolling in the 
institute. However, all levels from beginners to advanced are welcome. 

Admission to the institute does not imply admission as a degree candidate at NC State or any other campus of the University 
of North Carolina System. 

The TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) is administered to students who wish to take it at the end of the 
program. Since this is an institutional administration of the test, scores are only accepted by the Admissions Office and 
Graduate School at NC State. 

For information, contact Dr. John Levis at 515-9299 or levis(@social. chass.ncsu.edu 

ALEXANDER INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM 

The Alexander International Program is a residence hall community for both American and international students. The 174 
resident members of the program share the common goal of developing their understanding of different cultures and 
countries and developing crosscultural relationships. The 87 American students and the equal number of international 
students, representing approximately 40 foreign countries, become more sensitive to the values of different peoples, systems 
of government, economic structures, and religions. These goals are achieved through informal interactions, social and 
educational programming, and American and international roommate pairing. 

Program activities in past years have included both an international dinner and international coffeehouse series, emphasizing 
customs, foods, and entertainment from various cultures. Workshops on cultural differences, crosscultural communication 

20 



and relationships, international employment opportunities, and overseas studies are regularly included in the aimual calendar 
of programs and activities. These activities provide an opportunity for American students to add an international dimension to 
their education while attending NC State. 

Participation in this international program is selective and based upon potential contributions to the program. Students are 
expected to be active participants, to initiate programming, and to be supportive of the program goals. Students interested in 
applying or wishing additional information should inquire at 105 Alexander International Hall, (919) 515-2925. 

STUDY, TRAVEL, AND SHORT-TERM EMPLOYMENT ABROAD 

The Study Abroad Office assists students who would like to study, do an academic internship, volimteer, or work in another 
country. Opportunities are available for the summer, semester, or year, and many programs cost about the same as studying at 
NC State. The Study Abroad Office administers approximately $30,000 dollars in campus based scholarships for study 
abroad each year, in addition to national scholarship competitions such as Fulbright and NSEP. Students may also use their 
financial aid to study abroad. 

STUDY PROGRAMS 

Study programs abroad allow students to take course work overseas in their major and/or minor field, and/or fulfill general 
education requirements. Programs are available for the summer, the semester, or the year. Many programs have no foreign 
language requirement. There are four basic types of study abroad programs at NC State. 

NC State Exchange Programs are available in England, the Netherlands, Sweden, Germany, France, Finland, Costa Rica, 
Japan, and Australia. There are also special School of Design exchanges in several locations. Students on these exchanges 
pay regular NC State tuition. Room and board costs are paid to the host institution, but are typically very similar to those at 
NC State. Requirements include a GPA of at least 2.750 (some exchanges require a 3.000) and, for programs in Germany, 
France, and Costa Rica, completion of at least the 202 level of language study. 

ISEP Exchange Programs are available in over 30 countries in Asia, Afi-ica, Europe, and Latin America. Students on these 
exchanges pay regular tuition, room, and board to NC State. Requirements include a GPA of at least 2.750 and at least 
intermediate level (through 202) language proficiency for programs in which the language of instruction is not English. 

NC State Study Abroad Programs are available in Ghana (West Africa), India, and Spain. In addition, Internship/Study 
programs which combine classroom study with internships for academic credit are available in the Dominican Republic and, 
through the EPA program, in Spain, France, Germany, Belgium, England, and Australia. Students on these programs pay a 
set program charge for tuition, housing, and meals. The costs are usually somewhat more than instate, but less than out-of- 
state tuition at NC State. Requirements include a GPA of at least 2.750 and for programs in Spain, France, and Germany, 
completion of at least the 202 level of language study. 

NC State Summer Programs are available in more than a dozen locations each summer. NC State programs are directed by 
NC State faculty and offer NC State course credit and grades. Students on these programs pay a set program fee which 
generally covers tuition, housing, some meals, and excursions, although the details vary from program to program. Eligibility 
requirements vary, but many programs are open to students in good academic standing who have completed the freshman 
year. Students typically earn 6 hours of credit on summer programs. The programs below will be offered in the summer of 
1999. For the list of programs for the current year contact Assistant Director, Anne Haberkem in the Study Abroad Office, 
Box 7344. 

GREAT BARRIER REEF, AUSTRALIA. This program offers NC State students an opportunity to study tropical field 
ecology on Australia's Great Barrier Reef and combines the study of ecological theory with practical research in one of 
Earth's richest biological systems. Participants wanting credit may enroll in either an undergraduate course in Agriculture 
and Life Sciences or a graduate course in Zoology. Study is done at the Heron Island Research Station, a small island at the 
southern end of the Great Barrier. 

VIENNA, AUSTRIA. This program offers five courses taught in Vienna during the month of July: the Arts of Vienna, 
Vienna and Its Relation to East Central Europe and the European Union, Contemporary Science and Human Values (using 
Vienna as a case study), and two German-language courses. The first three courses are taught in English. Students live in a 
residence near the city center. The program includes a four-day trip to Prague and Budapest as well as an excursion to the 
castles and monasteries on the Danube. Most afternoon, evenings and weekends are free to explore one of the world's most 
beautiful and vibrant cities. 

AUSTRIA/EGYPT. This program is designed for students in the University Scholars Program and other NC State students 
with a GPA of 3.000 or better. It is a unique opportunity for comparative study of a central theme, water, in two very diverse 
cultures. Courses are HSS 398S Scholars Seminar "Water Works in Austria and Egypt" and MDS 35 1 "Arts: Ideas and 
Values." Extensive use of sites, architecture and museums in the two countries are incorporated into the course work. 

21 



COSTA RICA. This is a fiveweek program of intensive ethnographic field work focusing on the problems of sustainable 
ecotourism in Costa Rica, conducted jointly with East Carolina University'. Students spend the first week in Costa Rica's 
beautiful central highlands studying ethnographic methods and learning about the sociocultural and economic issues 
surrounding Costa Rica's tourism industry. The following four weeks are spent primarily in the region near Manuel Antonio 
National Park. Students stay in Costa Rican family homes in the town of Quepos. Participants must have at least two 
semesters of Spanish. 

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC. Located in Prague, one of Europe's most beautiful and historic cities, this 6-week 
program offers credit hours from the School of Design. Courses in landscape architecture, art and design are offered as 
studios. Study of architecture and urban planning consists of two 3-credit courses. Some weekend trips and a 4-day excursion 
through southern Bohemia are included. Cultural events include ballet, opera, jazz and marionette theater performances. 
Courses are taught in English. 

LONDON, ENGLAND. This program provides American-style university-level classroom instruction in the heart of 
London. NC State professors teach an arts course focusing on the arts, architecture, music and theater of London and a course 
on the British perspective on the American Revolution. Students reside and study at Canterbury Hall, a University of London 
residence hall located in the Bloomsbury section, within walking distance of the British Museum, Charles Dickens House, 
and the theater district. Included in the program are tickets to theater and concert events and day excursions. Optional 
weekend excursions are available to Paris and Edinburgh. 

OXFORD, ENGLAND. This program offers courses entitled Shakespeare, Art Treasures of Oxford, and Britain since 1930, 
all taught by British instructors. Students reside and study in St. Benet's Hall, a permanent private hall of Oxford University. 
The program offers several day trips including theater performances in London and the Shakespeare Theater at Stratford on 
Avon. A country town and industrial center, Oxford is best known as the seat of Oxford University, England's oldest 
university, and is celebrated for tradition, academic excellence and beautiful architecture. 

LILLE, FRANCE. This 6 week French language and European culture program is held at the renowned language institute 
CLARIFE, located at the Catholic University of Lille. Lille, known as "the Gateway to Europe," is the hub of cross-Channel 
railroad travel which makes this city readily accessible to most major European destinations. Excursions include Paris and the 
northeastern French coast. This program is open to students at the 200 level in French. 

BARODA, INDIA. This School of Design program provides upperclassmen and graduate students an opportunity to be 
immersed in the design, culture, and nature of India. It focuses on the study of issues in landscape architecture, urban design 
and architecture. Based in Baroda in the state of Gujarat. The program includes excursions to sites including Ahmedabad, 
Rajasthan, the Taj Mahal and New Delhi. 

GUBBIO,ITALY. During this 6 week program, design students (including architecture, landscape architecture and graphics 
students) will have firsthand experience observing and producing works of art in Italy. Students will have opportunities to 
interact with local artists and artisans in this picturesque hilitown and participate in a studio. Six hours studio credit can be 
earned. 

CUERNAVACA, MEXICO. This language and culture immersion program is located 70 miles south of Mexico City in the 
city of Cuemavaca, called the City of Eternal Spring because of its mild sunny climate. Students live with Mexican families 
and attend the Center for Bilingual and Multicultural Studies. This program includes weekend excursions to pyramids, major 
archaeological sites, historical cities and a recreational weekend in Acapulco. Students may earn up to six credits of Spanish 
language credit, including beginning, intermediate and advanced level courses. 

SANTANDER, SPAIN. This six-week program is available to upper level and graduate students in architecture and 
landscape architecture, offered jointly with UNC-Charlotte. An intensive studio course focuses on the design of urban spaces. 
The studio group also has extensive field trips to major Spanish cities and small towns in order to study historical and 
contemporary examples of architecture, parks, gardens and plazas. Spanish language ability is not required. Students live in 
the University of Cantabria's residence halls. The courses are taught by professors and professional designers from North 
Carolina. 

GHANA, WEST AFRICA. (Humanities) Offered through the AfricanAmerican Studies Minor program, this program offers 
course work and immersion in African culture. Courses include "Ghanaian Culture and Society," "History, Politics and 
Economic Development of Ghana," and "Social and Psychological Health Issues in an African Context." Based at the 
University of Ghana in Legon. the program will also include a number of excursions. Housing is primarily in family home 
stay. 

GHANA, WEST AFRICA. (Art and Design) Sponsored by the School of Design, this program offers students an 
opportunity for intensive studio and research work in African art and design, and exposure to the rich history and traditions of 
Ghana. Based at the College of Art at the University of Science and Technology in Kumasi. Courses offered in ceramics, 
painting, sculpture, and textiles. 

22 



VOLUNTEER AND WORK PROGRAMS 

In addition to the academic programs listed above, NC State students may participate in a wide variety of volunteer and paid 
work options around the world. Most programs operate during the summer months, although some programs during the 
academic year are available. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM 

NC State is one of 100 colleges and universities in the United States participating in the International Student Exchange 
Program. Through ISEP, undergraduate students may attend any of 100 member institutions in Africa, Asia, Australia, 
Canada, Europe, and Latin America on an exchange student basis for a summer semester or single academic year. 

NC State students pay a program fee for their stay abroad which is based on their regular tuition and fees plus the cost of 
room and board at NC State. Aside from travel expenses and health coverage, ISEP makes it possible for NC State students 
to study outside the country for the same cost of continuing studies at NC State. This arrangement also allows students to 
maintain their eligibility for financial aid. While abroad, ISEP students are entitled to all the benefits and services of regular 
ftjiltime students at their host institutions. Room and board are provided and an ISEP coordinator on each campus is available 
to students for assistance with any problem. 

To apply to participate in ISEP at NC State a student should have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.750 and have 
already studied at NC State for two semesters. Applicants must be proficient in the language of instruction at the study sites 
they choose. A campus selection committee, made up of faculty members, chooses those applicants as NC State's 
participants. Applicants are not in competition with each other. The ISEP Selection Committee bases its decision on the 
feasibility of each applicant's proposed course of study, on academic background, application and references. The selection 
process for each academic year takes place in the winter of the preceding year. Students begin the application process by 
requesting a copy of the ISEP Directory from the Study Abroad Office. 



NC STATE ADMISSIONS 

The "early action" freshman application deadline is November 15. "Early Action" applicants will receive a response by early 
January but still have until May 1 to confirm enrollment plans. The freshman application priority deadline for the fall 
semester and summer sessions is February 1 ; the transfer student priority deadline is April 1 . Freshmen are strongly 
encouraged to apply during the fall of the senior year in high school. All applicants for the School of Design must submit 
applications by December 1 . Applications for the spring semester should be submitted prior to November 1 . The School of 
Design does not admit students in the spring. Each applicant must complete an application form which may be obtained from 
high school counselors or by writing to: 

Director of Admissions 

Box 7103 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7103 

Note: A nonrefundable $55 fee must accompany the completed application. 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

Admission to the University is competitive, and it is possible to be admissible to some programs but not to all programs at 
NC State. Applicants are asked to indicate their first and second choices for a curriculum, including undeclared majors within 
a college, or, if undecided, to indicate their choice of participating in the First Year College. Applications which are not 
admissible in the first curriculum choice will be reviewed for admissibility in their second curriculum choice. Transfer 
between programs after a successful first year may be possible. 

The admissions decision is based primarily on the evaluation of the high school record, including the level and difficulty of 
the courses taken, the overall grade point average, rank in class, and scores on the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) or the 
American College Testing Program (ACT). Extra-curricular involvement and leadership are also considered. These factors 
are reviewed with the curriculum choice to determine admissibility as a freshman at NC State. 

In addition, the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina System has determined that the minimum 
undergraduate admissions requirements for all constituent institutions, including NC State, shall be: - A high school diploma 
or its equivalent - English - four course units in English, emphasizing grammar, composition, and literature - Mathematics - 
three course units in math, including algebra I, algebra II, and geometry, or a higher level math course for which algebra II is 
a prerequisite - Social Studies - two course units in social studies, including one unit in United States history - Science - three 
course units in science, including at least one unit in a life or biological science; at least one unit in a physical science (for 

23 



example, physical science, chemistn , or physics) and at least one laboratory course. Prospective students must complete at 
least two course units in one foreign language. It is recommended that every student take a foreign language course and a 
mathematics course in the twelfth grade. Any additional entrance requirements /or admission to A'C State will be set forth in 
the Freshman Admissions Bulletin for that year Any exceptions to Uni\'ersity admissions requirements must be approved by 
the faculty members of the University Undergraduate Admissions Committee 

Applicants are accepted on cither junior or senior test scores, although senior scores are recommended, especially if the 
applicant is also applying for financial aid or scholarships. An interview is not required and does not weigh in the admissions 
decision; a prospective student is always welcome to visit the Admissions Office, 1 12 Peele Hall. The Admissions Office 
conducts freshman information sessions every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 10;30 a.m. and on Tuesday and Thursday 
at 1 :30 p.m. Campus tours led by students are conducted each weekday, weather permitting, at 12:20 p.m., starting at the 
Memorial Bell Tower. 

Two-Year Agricultural Institute 

Requirements for admission to the Agricultural Institute, a two-year terminal program, include graduation from an accredited 
high school or successful completion of the high school equivalency examination administered by the State Department of 
Public Instruction. The application should include either a copy of the high school record or a letter indicating the applicant 
has passed the equivalency examination. Each application is reviewed and evaluated by the Institute Director. SAT scores are 
not required but are recommended. Course work is not transferable into the four year degree programs. Completion of the 
Agricultural Institute leads to an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree. (See College of Agriculture and Life Sciences). 

Standardized Test Scores 

Applicants for admission as freshmen must submit scores from the College Board Scholastic Assessment Tests (SAT) or the 
American College Testing Program (ACT). Students should request that their scores be sent directly from the testing service 
to NC State. (SAT Code #5496. ACT code #3 164) Information booklets and application forms may be obtained from school 
counselors or by writing directly to the testing services; 

SAT address; The College Board ATP 

Box 592 

Princeton, New Jersey 08541 

ACT address: ACT Records Department 

P.O. Box 451 

Iowa City. Iowa 52243-045 1 

SAT II (Achievement Tests) 

Freshman students must present SAT II Mathematics Subject Test scores to ensure proper math placement at NC State. 
Students should take the Level II-C test. 

Advanced Placement (AP) / International Baccalaureate (IB) 

A student may qualify for advanced placement by one or more of the following means; (1) by passing a proficiency 
examination administered by a teaching department at NC State; (2) by attaining a score of 670 or higher on the verbal 
portion of the SAT; (3) by meeting a specific minimum score on certain of the Advanced Placement Program (AP) or IB 
examinations; and (4) by attaining a minimum score on certain of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) subject 
tests. 

OUT OF STATE STUDENTS 

Undergraduate applicants from outside North Carolina may be required to meet more competitive standards for admission 
than North Carolina residents. NC State is limited to accepting not more than 18 percent of total new undergraduate students 
from outside the state. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

NC State welcomes transfer applicants, and in recent years, more than 25 percent of our graduates started their college 
programs at other institutions. A transfer student should present at least 30 semester hours (or 45 quarter hours) of "C" or 
better college level work, including an English class and a college level math class applicable to the degree program. The 
grade point average required varies, depending upon the requested program of study. Additional specific course work is 
required for some programs. Transfer students must be eligible to return to each institution previously attended and must 
submit individual transcripts from each institution. 

Students who graduated from high school since 1990 must submit a high school record to verify that they have met minimum 
admissions requirements for course work as outlined in the Freshman Admissions section of this catalog. Exceptions to this 
requirement are students who will have earned an A. A., AS. or A. FA. degree before enrolling at NC State. Individuals who 

24 



do not have the minimum admissions requirements at the high school level must complete at the college level six semester 
hours or nine quarter hours each of English, mathematics, science and social science to be eligible to transfer. 

Once applicants have been accepted, their transcripts are evaluated for credit that is transferable to the University. The 
college to which application is made will determine the exact amount of credit applicable toward a degree at NC State. A 
grade of C or better is required before a course may be considered for credit. 

Transcripts are not evaluated until the applicant has been admitted. International students are carefiilly screened for evidence 
of English language proficiency, adequate fmancial backing and academic credentials indicating potential for success. 

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

Unclassified students are those working for college credit but not enrolled in a degreegranting program. Admission as an 
unclassified student requires the recommendation of the dean of the school in which the student wishes to enroll. Unclassified 
students must meet the same entrance requirements as regular degree students and must meet the same academic requirement 
to continue. If, at a later date, unclassified students wish to change to regular status, their credits will be evaluated in terms of 
the requirements of their intended curriculum. 

LIFELONG EDUCATION STUDENTS 

The Lifelong Education student classification is designed for residents of the Triangle area who have not been formally 
admitted into a degree program at the University but who wish to enroll in courses offered by the University. Lifelong 
Education students are limited to a maximum course load of two courses plus one physical education course each semester or 
summer session. 

Lifelong Education student applications should be made through the Office of Adult Credit Programs & Summer Sessions, at 
the McKimmon Center, comer of Western Boulevard and Gorman Street. If Lifelong Education students wish to become 
undergraduate degree candidates at a later date, they must make application through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions 
and are encouraged to make an appointment with that office to discuss entrance requirements. Lifelong Education students 
wishing to become graduate degree candidates must make application through the Graduate School and should consult the 
Graduate Administrator in the chosen field of study for advice or clarification of information. 

SERVICEMEN'S OPPORTUNITY COLLEGES 

NC State has been designated as a member of the Servicemen's Opportunity Colleges (SOC) General Registry - a network of 
institutions sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities and the American Association of 
Community and Junior Colleges. Servicemen are encouraged to take college level courses offered by accredited institutions 
and made available to military personnel through SOC. Records are evaluated, files are retained, counseling is provided, and 
recognition is given for learning through non institutional sources when appropriate. Transcripts must be sent to the Director 
of Admissions directly from the institution offering the course. 

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) 

A national program administered by the College Board, CLEP is a series of examinations that allows students to show 
knowledge in a wide range of areas. The tests are used to grant credit for corresponding college courses. There are five 
General and 30 Subject Examinations. At NC State credit is granted primarily for Subject Examinations, as these provide a 
more satisfactory evaluation of subject matter covered in NC State courses. Scores and essays, if required, are reviewed and 
credit granted by the department offering the corresponding course. Information regarding credit can be obtained in the 
Registrar's Office, 1000 Harris Hall, (919) 515-2576. 

Both General and Subject Examinations at NC State are administered during the third calendar line of each month except 
December and February. It is necessary to register for the examinations at least three weeks before the first of the week in 
which they are to be given. The examinations are administered through the Counseling Center at North Carolina Central 
University, Durham, North Carolina, (919) 683-6336. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Procedures and policies governing graduate admission are outlined in a separate catalog issued by the Graduate School. For a 
copy of the Graduate Catalog write: 

Dean of the Graduate School 
104 Peele Hall, Box 7102 
North Carolina State University 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7102 

25 



NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION PROGRAM 

Leazar Hall 

Roger A. E. Callanan, Director 

Roxanna S. McGraw, Assistant Director 

New Student Orientation provides assistance to newly admitted first year and transfer undergraduate students in their 
introduction and transition to the university experience. Guided by orientation professionals assisted by a well-trained staff 
of current students, orientation sessions coordinate student access and interaction with both academic and student affairs' 
resources, procedures and opportunities, including academic advising and course registration. In addition to one-day and 
two-day orientation sessions which are required of all new students. New Student Orientation coordinates the WolfStop 
information program and the Student Success Institute. These resources, in combination with traditional orientation 
programming, provide multiple points of informational access and personal assistance 

REQUIRED IMMUNIZATION DOCUMENTATION 

North Carolina state law requires all new enrollees in the university system to present proof of immunization prior to 
completion of registration. 

Verified proof of immunization against rubella, measles, tetanus and diphtheria must be presented to the University Student 
Health Service no later than the first day of classes. Also required is a PPD skin test within 12 months of the first day of 
classes. If this requirement is not met, dismissal from school is mandatory under the law. For assistance, contact Student 
Health Services, (919) 515-7233. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration is conducted by using either the TELEPHONIC SYSTEM or the Web TRACSLINK. A Schedule of Courses 
is available for every semester prior to the beginning of the registration period. This contains all necessary instructions for 
completing registration. 

Registration consists of three steps: (I) meeting with advisers to determine course requirements and to obtain a Personal 
Identification Number (PIN); (2) registering for courses using the TRACS system; and (3) paying tuition and fees and all 
other debts to the University by the established deadlines. Instructions for completing registration are issued each semester 
and summer session. 

For more information, contact the Department of Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall, (919) 515-2572. 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION 

A regularly enrolled undergraduate degree student who is enrolled in at least eight credit hours at NC State may take, under 
certain conditions, course work at one of the Raleigh colleges, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at the 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro, at Duke University, or at North Carolina Central University. Interinstitutional 
registration forms and all registration procedures are available from the Department of Registration and Records. 

SCHEDULE CHANGES - DROPS AND ADDS 

Courses may be added during the first two weeks of a regular semester. All courses may be dropped without regard to course 
load during the first two weeks of a regular semester. During the third and fourth weeks of a semester, fulltime undergraduate 
students who wish to drop courses at any level and whose academic load would thereby fall below the twelve hour minimum 
course load may do so only for documented medical reasons or other verified, unforeseen grounds of personal or family 
hardship. 

For undergraduate students, exceptions to the drop policies require the recommendation of a student's adviser (or the 
departmental coordinator of advising or the department head) and approval by the student's dean. Students who wish to drop 
all courses for which they are enrolled, must withdraw from the University for the remainder of the semester or summer term 
in which they are enrolled. A degree student who finds it necessary to drop all courses will initiate withdrawal from the 
University at the Counseling Center, Student Health Center, 28 1 5 Gates Avenue, 2"'' floor. 



26 



First Semester 


Second Semester 


Full Year 


$1,182 


$ 1,182 


$ 2,364 


$5,765 


$5,765 


$11,530 


$1,045 


$1,045 


$2,090 


$1,010 


$1,010 


$2,020 


$300 


$300 


$600 


$525 


$525 


$1,050 


$200 


$200 


$400 


First Semester 


Second Semester 


Full Year 


$4,262 


$4,262 


$8,524 


$8,845 


$8,845 


$17,690 



NC STATE TUITION AND FEES 

North Carolina Resident - $1,182.00 per semester (effective 1998-99 academic year) 

Nonresident - $5,765.00 per semester (effective 1998-99 academic year) 

A statement of tuition and fees is mailed to each pre-registered student before the beginning of any term. The statement must 
be returned with full payment or complete financial aid information by the due date appearing on the statement. Normally, 
the due date is two weeks before classes begin. Non-pre-registered students are required to pay their tuition and fees plus late 
fees during late registration. Fees are the same for both residents and nonresidents and are required of all students. 
Nonresident students are required to pay an additional $4,583 per semester for tuition. 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL UNDERGRADUATE EXPENSES 

Tuition and Fees 

N.C. Residents 

Out of State Residents 

Room Rent 

Meals 

Books and Supplies 

Other personal expenses 

Transportation 

Total 

Tuition and Fees 

N.C. Residents 

Out of State Residents 

NOTES: 

1 . Tuition and fees are fixed items of cost. 

2. Room rent is shown as main-campus, double occupancy rate. 

3. Meals, books and supplies, other personal expenses, and transportation are shown as estimates. 

EXPENSES OTHER THAN TUITION AND GENERAL FEES 

Application Fee: A noru^efundable fee of $55 must accompany each application for admission. 

Room Rent: New incoming students receive room reservation instructions in the letter of acceptance. Continuing students are 

provided a card with instructions at their residence hall rooms. The 1998-99 charge for room rent ranged from $925 per 

semester for most residence halls to $1210 for North Hall, Wood Hall, and Watauga Hall. 

Meals: During their first academic year, new freshmen electing to reside on campus are required to participate in one of the 

University's available meal plans. Meal plan costs in 1998-99 range from $585 to $1,160. Other students pay for meals 

individually at the various dining facilities available both on and near the campus. 

Books and Supplies: Books and supplies are usually purchased during the first week of classes directly from the Students 

Supply Stores. Allow approximately $300 per semester for purchasing books and supplies. 

Personal Expenses: Personal expenses vary widely among students but the estimate of $525 is based on what students report 

that they spend on these items. 

Administrative Management Fee: A special administrative management fee of $250 per semester and $ 1 50 per summer 

session is required from a contracting agency sponsoring international students whose programs are coordinated through the 

University's Office of International Visitors. 

Cooperative Education Program Fee: Required of all participating coop students for each semester in which they are 

enrolled in an offcampus work assignment. This fee, set at $338 for the 1998 fall semester, the 1999 spring semester, or the 

combined 1999 summer sessions, is used for partial support of the Cooperative Education Program staff in job development 

and placement activities. Students paying this fee are entitled to all University services, facilities, and programs during the 

semester or combined summer sessions for which they are enrolled. 

College of Engineering Computing Fee: All students enrolled in the College of Engineering, both graduate and 

undergraduate, will be billed a $45 per semester fee to support the Engineering Computing Facility. Payment of the fee will 

provide students with access to standalone workstations which comprise the Engineering Computing Facility. 

Students who enroll in a co-op work session will not be billed for the Computing Fee unless they also enroll in NC State 
courses. 



27 



REQUIRED FEES 

Required fees are levied for services, facilities, and programs available to all students whether or not the student takes 
advantage of them. Students are assessed fees based on the course load they are taking. An itemization of required fees and 
other detailed information concerning expenses or related data can be obtained by contacting the University Cashier's Oflfice, 
NC State. Bo.x 7213, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7213, (919) 515-2986, or toll free: (888) 627-8826. 

REFUND POLICY 

Refunds for official withdrawals from NC State University are prorated based upon the percentage of the enrollment period 
attended. No refunds are made for ofTicial withdrawals af^er 50 percent of the enrollment period. The prorated withdrawal 
schedule for each semester is publicized through university media after it is established. In some instances, circumstances 
justify the waiving of rules regarding refunds. An example might be withdrawal because of sickness. Students have the 
privilege of appeal to the Fee Appeals Committee when they believe special consideration is merited. Applications for such 
appeals may be obtained from the University Cashier's Office, 1101 Pulien Hall. 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

The basis for determining the appropriate tuition charge rests upon whether a student is a resident or a nonresident for tuition 
purposes. Each student must make a statement as to the length of his or her residence in North Carolina, with assessment by 
the institution of that statement to be conditioned by the following. 

Residence. 

To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must become a legal resident and remain a legal resident for at least 
twelve months immediately prior to classification. Thus, there is a distinction between legal residence and residence for 
tuition purposes. Furthermore, twelve months legal residence means more than simple abode in North Carolina. In particular, 
it means maintaining a domicile (permanent home of indefinite duration) as opposed to "maintaining a mere temporary 
residence or abode incident to enrollment in an institution of higher education." The burden of establishing facts which justify 
classification of a student as a resident entitled to instate tuition rates is on the applicant for such classification, who must 
show his or her entitlement by the preponderance (the greater part) of the residentiary information. 

Initiative 

Being classified a resident for tuition purposes is contingent on the student's seeking such status and providing all 
information that the institution may require in making the determination. 

Parents' Domicile. 

If an individual, irrespective of age, has living parent(s) or court appointed guardian of the person, the domicile of such 
parent(s) or guardian is, prima facie, the domicile of the individual; but this prima facie evidence of the individual's domicile 
may or may not be sustained by other information. Further, nondomiciliary status of parents is not deemed prima facie 
evidence of the applicant child's status if the applicant has lived (though not necessarily legally resided) in North Carolina for 
the five years preceding enrollment or reregistration. 

Effect of Marriage. 

Marriage alone does not prevent a person from becoming or continuing to be a resident for tuition purposes, nor does 
marriage in any circumstance insure that a person will become or continue to be a resident for tuition purposes. Marriage and 
the legal residence of one's spouse are, however, relevant information in determining residentiary intent. Furthermore, if both 
a husband and his wife are legal residents of North Carolina and if one of them has been a legal resident longer than the other, 
then the longer duration may be claimed by either spouse in meeting the twelve month requirement for instate tuition status. 

Military Personnel. 

A North Carolinian who serves outside the State in the armed forces does not lose North Carolina domicile simply by reason 
of such service, and students from the military may prove retention or establishment of residence by reference, as in other 
cases, to residentiary acts accompanied by residentiary intent. 

In addition, a separate North Carolina statute affords tuition rate benefits to certain military personnel and their dependents 
even though not qualifying for the in-state tuition rate by reason of twelve months legal residence in North Carolina. 
Members of the armed services, while stationed in and concurrently living in North Carolina, may be charged a tuition rate 
lower than the out-of-state tuition rate to the extent that the total of entitlements for application tuition costs available from 
the federal government, plus certain amounts based under a statutory formula upon the in-state tuition rate, is a sum less than 
the out-of-state tuition rate for the pertinent enrollment. A dependent relative of a service member stationed in North Carolina 
is eligible to be charged the in-state tuition rate while the dependent relative is living in North Carolina with the service 
member and if the dependent relative has met any requirement of the Selective Service System applicable to the dependent 

28 



relative. These tuition benefits may be enjoyed only if the applicable requirements for admission have been met; these 
benefits alone do not provide the basis for receiving those derivative benefits under the provisions of the residence 
classification statute reviewed elsewhere in this summary. 

Grace Period. 

If a person (1) has been a bona fide legal resident, (2) has consequently been classified a resident for tuition purposes, and 
(3) has subsequently lost North Carolina legal residence while enrolled at a public institution of higher education, that person 
may continue to enjoy the instate tuition rate for a grace period of twelve months measured from the date on which North 
Carolina legal residence was lost. If the twelve months ends during an academic term for which the person is enrolled at a 
State institution of higher education, the grace period extends, in addition, to the end of that term. The fact of marriage to one 
who continues domiciled outside North Carolina does not by itself cause loss of legal residence marking the beginning of the 
grace period. 

Minors. 

Minors (persons under 18 years of age) usually have the domicile of their parents, but certain special cases are recognized by 
the residence classification statute in determining residence for tuition purposes. 

(A) If a minor's parents live apart, the minor's domicile is deemed to be North Carolina for the time period(s) that either 
parent, as a North Carolina legal resident, may claim and does claim the minor as a tax dependent, even if other law or 
judicial act assigns the minor's domicile outside North Carolina. A minor thus deemed to be a legal resident will not, upon 
achieving majority before enrolling at an institution of higher education, lose North Carolina legal residence if that person (1) 
upon becoming an adult "acts, to the extent that the person's degree of actual emancipation permits, in a manner consistent 
with bonafide legal residence in North Carolina" and (2) "begins enrolhnent at an institution of higher education not later 
than the fall academic term following completion of education prerequisite to admission at such institution." 

(B) If a minor has lived for five or more consecutive years with relatives (other than parents) who are domiciled in North 
Carolina and if the relatives have functioned during this time as if they were personal guardians, the minor will be deemed a 
resident for tuition purposes for an enrolled term commencing immediately after at least five years in which these 
circumstances have existed. If under this consideration a minor is deemed to be a resident for tuition purposes immediately 
prior to his or her eighteenth birthday, that person on achieving majority will be deemed a legal resident of North Carolina of 
at least twelve months duration. This provision acts to confer instate tuition status even in the face of other provisions of law 
to the contrary; however, a person deemed a resident of twelve months duration pursuant to this provision continues to be a 
legal resident of the State only so long as he or she does not abandon North Carolina domicile. 

Lost but Regained Domicile. 

If a student ceases enrollment at or graduates from an institution of higher education while classified a resident for tuition 
purposes and then both abandons and reacquires North Carolina domicile within a 12-month period, that person, if he or she 
continues to maintain the reacquired domicile into re-enrollment at an institution of higher education, may reenroll at the 
instate tuition rate without having to meet the usual 12-month durational requirement. However, any one person may receive 
the benefit of this provision only once. 

Change of Status. 

A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution (or permitted to reenroll following an absence from the institutional 
program which involved a formal withdrawal from enrolhnent) must be classified by the admitting institution either as a 
resident or as a nonresident for tuition purposes prior to actual enrolhnent. A residence status classification once assigned 
(and fmalized pursuant to any appeal properly taken) may be changed thereafter (with corresponding change in billing rates) 
only at intervals corresponding with the established primary divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students. 

When a student transfers from one North Carolina public institution of higher education to another, he or she is treated as a 
new student by the institution to which he or she is transferring and must be assigned an initial residence status classification 
for tuition purposes. 

Note: General Statute (G.S.) 116143.1 is the prevailing statute governing residence status classification. Copies of the 
applicable law and of the implementing regulations are available for inspection in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 
112 Peek Hall. This information is subject to change. 



29 



NC STATE FINANCIAL AID 

To be considered for assistance by the Office of Financial Aid. a student and his or her parents must complete the federal 
government's Free Application for Federal Student Aid (¥AFS A) available from high school guidance offices as well as the 
NC State Office of Financial Aid. This form must be submined to the federal student aid processing center for evaluation of 
the family's ability to pay for educational expenses. Students who submit FAFSAs to the federal processor by March 1 are 
considered on-time applicants and are given first priority for need-based scholarship and grant consideration. In addition to 
the FAFSA, entering freshmen are encouraged to complete the College Scholarship Service's PROFILE application in the 
fall of their senior year in high school and have the results of that application sent to NC State. The PROFILE application 
provides early need analysis information needed by the university in making early scholarship commitments for which need 
and merit are factors. 

By completing the FAFSA, undergraduates are given consideration for all forms of federal financial assistance, including the 
Federal Pell Grant, as well as most types of state and institutional financial aid (except for departmental and university merit 
awards, which often require separate applications). Most financial aid awards are made based on the applicant's financial 
need, satisfactory academic progress, and timely submission of the FAFSA. Determination of the applicant's need is based 
on estimated educational costs as established by the Office of Financial Aid and a consideration of the family's financial 
strength, as determined by the analysis of the FAFSA. 

Aid is available on a non-discriminatory basis to all qualifying students. Financial aid awards are usually made in the form of 

"packages" which consist of a combination of gift aid (scholarships and grants), loan, and/or campus employment through the 
Federal Work-Study program. These aid packages include aid from all sources, including the federal government, state and 
institutional funds, and private entities. Students must reapply for aid each year, and renewal is based on continued financial 
need as well as satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Policy on Satisfactory Academic for Financial Aid 
Eligibility. 

A brochure giving a detailed explanation of the aid application and financial aid award process, as well as types of aid 
available, may be obtained from the office of Financial Aid. 2005 Harris Hall. (919)515-2421. 

OTHER OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AID SERVICES 

Short Term Loans - Short term loans are available in small amounts (usually not exceeding $1000) to ftill-time enrolled 
students with previous good repayment records. These loans are generally approved and disbursed in the same day, and are 
intended to provide financial assistance to meet unexpected expenses. Short-term loans generally must be repaid within 30 
days or by the end of the term, whichever comes first. 

Student Employment Service - The Office of Financial Aid coordinates an employment service to assist students with 
information about part-time academic year or summer employment possibilities. No particular academic or financial 
qualifications are required to obtain jobs on or off campus (Note: Federal Work-Study jobs are need-based and are not 
included in this listing). A current listing of job openings is maintained by the Office if Financial Aid and under student 
employment on NC State's home page. 

NC STATE STUDENT HOUSING 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

The University operates twenty residence halls across campus for almost 7.000 residents. A variety of residential options are 
available to accommodate diverse student interests and needs. The residence halls are located across campus, offering single 
gender and co-ed options in buildings ranging in age from Watauga Hall (1906) to Wood Hall (1983). Each hall is different, 
with amenities such as computer rooms, laundry rooms, kitchens, and air conditioning available. The professional and student 
staff members recognize the needs of the residence hall population and strive to provide a challenging yet supportive 
atmosphere fostering academic success, as well as individual and interpersonal growth. 

To be eligible to live in the residence halls during the fall and spring semesters, undergraduate students must be enrolled in at 
least nine credit hours, while graduate students must maintain at least six credit hours. Students who need to enroll in fewer 
hours, or who must drop below these minimum requirements during the semester, should contact the University Housing 
office to request that an exception be made. In certain cases, students may be required to submit a letter of support from their 
advisor. During the summer sessions, university housing is provided for any enrolled student as space permits. 

For more information about campus residence halls, contact University Housing, 1112 Pullen Hall, Box 73 1 5, NC State, 
Raleigh, NC 27695, or call (9 1 9) 5 1 5-2440. 



30 



EDWARD S. KING VILLAGE 

The University owns and operates 295 apartments (efficiency, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom units). Eligibility to live in 
the Edward S. King Village is contingent upon being a full-time student at NC State and one of the following: married and 
living with a spouse and/or children; a single parent living with a child or children for the duration of occupancy; graduate 
student; married student unaccompanied by spouse or children; or nontraditional undergraduate student. 

E. S. King Village staff and the Village Council implement programs and activities for students, spouses, and children. 
Recreational areas, playground equipment, and other facilities have been enhanced recently to support the family community 
atmosphere. 

Note: Due to the attractiveness of E. S. King Village, there is usually a waiting list for applicants. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

The University Housing maintains self-help listings of off-campus apartments, rooms, and houses for rent. These listings are 
not published, but are available in the University Housing Office, 1 1 12 Pullen Hall, during the hours of 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. 

The University has no mobile home parking areas, but privately owned mobile home parks are located within a reasonable 
driving distance of the campus. 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

Twenty of the 26 general college fraternities, and seven of the ten general college sororities chartered at the University 
maintain chapter houses. Eleven of the fraternities, and four (fall) of the sororities are housed on Fraternity Court, a 
University-owned project. The remaining fraternities and sororities are located through the immediate campus community. 

Rental fees vary in fraternity and sorority houses depending on the individual chapter, but are approximately the same as the 
residence hall rates. 

For more information about Greek housing, contact the chapters directly or contact Greek Life, 21 10 Harris Hall, Box 3714, 
NC State, Raleigh, NC 27695-7314, or call (919) 515-2441. 

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

ACADEMIC ADVISING 

Every regularly enrolled student is assigned for academic advising to a faculty member who is normally a member of the 
department which is, or is most likely to become, the student's major department. 

Responsibilities of the Student 

Students have the primary responsibility for planning their individual programs and meeting graduation requirements. This 
involves: keeping up-to-date with university, college, and departmental curricular requirements through materials available 
from the faculty advisers or departmental coordinators of advising; keeping informed of academic deadlines and changes in 
academic policies; and consulting with the faculty adviser or departmental coordinator of advising during each registration 
period, following notification of academic warning status, and at other times as needed and required by academic policy; and 
diligent in attending class and meeting class objectives and assignments. 

Responsibilities of the Faculty Adviser 

Although students have the primary responsibility for planning their programs, faculty advisers are expected to: be available 
for conferences at appropriate times and places about which their advisees have been informed; provide accurate information 
about academic regulations and procedures, course prerequisites, and graduation requirements; assist students in planning 
academic programs suited to their interests and abilities and their career objectives; discuss with their advisees appropriate 
course choices in fulfilling curriculum requirements as well as possible consequences of various alternative course choices: 
inform their advisees when the advisee's proposed course selections conflict with University academic or curricular 
regulations; assist advisees with following proper procedures for such things as exceptions to the course drop deadlines, 
auditing a course before or after taking it for credit, taking a course under the credit by examination policy, registering for 19 
or more credit hours, registering for Cooperating Raleigh Colleges (CRC) interinstitutional courses, or repeating a course 
previously passed; refer their advisees for special testing or counseling as needed; assist their advisees in considering the 
appropriateness of academic adjustments where these become necessary in cases of serious injury or ilhiess. 

31 



Responsibilities of the Coordinator of Advising and Teaching 

Each college or department has a coordinator of advising and teaching who is responsible for: assigning, training, and 
supervising faculty advisers; providing up-to-date, printed course and curriculum information for advisers and students: 
reassigning to another adviser any student who so requests assisting any student who wants to major in the coordinator's area 
of study but is ineligible at the time to transfer into it. Students in this categor>' keep their adviser in the department in which 
they are enrolled but consult additionally with the coordinator of advising and teaching for the department offering the 
curriculum in which they w ish to enroll. Whenever appropriate, the coordinator will advise students that they should consider 
alternative curricula. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students are eligible for graduation when they have completed satisfactorily all the academic requirements of their degree 

program as specified by their major department, their college, and the university. 

NC State requires that, in addition to other university, college, and departmental requirements, all students must have a grade 

point average of at least 2.000, based on all courses attempted at NC State, in order to be eligible to receive a baccalaureate 

degree. 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation - Minimum credit hours required in a baccalaureate curriculum that has not 

been designated a five year program range from 120 to 128. These are shown for each curriculum. Students may take more 

hours than the required minimum. 

Length of Time to Graduation - The normal and expected length of time to graduation is four years (eight semesters) 
provided the student completes an average of slightly more than 16 credit hours each semester (for most curricula) or attends 
one or more summer sessions. 

By action of the N. C. General Assembly, effective with the 1 994 fall semester, new students entering any of the sixteen 
campuses of The University of North Carolina system (including NC State), will be assessed a 25 percent tuition surcharge 
once they have attempted more than 140 degree credit hours. (Degree programs at NC State require 128 hours or less for 
graduation.) Courses taken in summer school at any UNC-System campus do not count toward the 140 hour limitation. 
Question about this new policy should be directed to the Department of Registration and Records, 515-2572. 

In order to make continuous progress toward graduation, students are encouraged to take full advantage of the university's 
advising and support services. Effective career decision-making and early, deliberate, long-range semester-by-semester 
planning of courses and careful selection of extra-curricular commitments can provide direction and motivation necessary for 
elective use of time to graduation. 

Additional factors that may assure a student's continuous progress toward graduation include good academic performance in 
freshman and basic prerequisite courses, advanced placement for introductory courses, and enrollment in summer sessions. 
Students are discouraged from taking unrealistic course loads as a means to accelerate their progress toward graduation as 
this may result in poor academic performance. 

Students may take more than eight semesters to complete an undergraduate program at NC State. In some cases this is the 
result of effective decision-making on the part of the student for such things as participation in cooperative education or study 
abroad programs, a decision to be a part-time student with a reduced course load for reasons of health, necessary outside 
employment, or parental responsibilities, or attempting dual degrees, double majors, or academic minors. 

In other cases the length of time to graduation may be prolonged beyond the eighth semester as a result of incomplete or 
inadequate secondary school background requiring some additional compensatory, developmental, or prerequisite courses, 
poor academic performance in the freshman year or early semesters, or late changes of curriculum. 

Semester-by-Semester Displays - The requirements for many curricula throughout this section are set forth in semester-by- 
semester displays. One purpose for these displays is to illustrate how certain sequences of courses and prerequisites may be 
scheduled. Another purpose is to reflect whether courses are normally offered in the fall or the spring semester. Otherwise, 
the semester-by-semester displays are merely advisory and not mandatory. The typical semester schedule shown in the 
displays may not be the appropriate one for many students. Students are required to consult with their faculty advisers prior 
to registration each semester. 

Limited D Grades - Some colleges and departments have established limitations on the use of D grades in certain courses or 
categories of courses for satisfying graduation requirements. 

Grade Point Average in Major - Some departments have established graduation requirements of a grade point average of 
2.000 on all courses attempted in the major at NC State or a "C" or better in some or all major courses. Such a requirement is 
in addition to the university grade point average requirement of 2.000 for all courses attempted at NC State. Students are 
encouraged to inquire about specific requirements in majors of interest. 

32 



Residence Requirements - To be eligible for a bachelor's degree, a student must be enrolled in a degree program at NC 
State, must have completed at least 25 percent of credit hours required for graduation through courses offered by NC State, 
and must have earned at least 30 of the last 45 hours of credit through NC State courses. In no case shall the proportion of 
credit hours taken at NC State and applied towards a bachelor's degree be less than 25 percent. Individual departments and/or 
colleges may have additional residence requirements. 

Note: The College of Engineering has a policy that transfer students normally must earn at least 48 of their last 60 hours of 
credit at NC State while enrolled as degree candidates. 

Note: The College of Management has a policy that Accounting and Business Management majors normally must earn at 
least 30 credit hours while officially enrolled as a degree candidate in either the ACC or BUS curriculum. 

FREE ELECTIVES 

All schools and colleges are encouraged to include free electives in their curricula to satisfy their educational objectives. 
Moreover, students who would like to take courses beyond those required for their degree are encouraged to do so. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Undergraduate degree students are classified according to the number of completed credit hours. The required number of 
hours of each classification is: 



Classification 


Semester Hours of Earned Credit 


Freshman (FR) 


Fewer than 30 


Sophomore (SO) 


30 or more, but fewer than 60 


Junior (JR) 


60 or more, but fewer than 92 


Senior (SR) 


92 or more 



Agricultural Institute students are designated as first (01) year if they have earned fewer than 30 semester credits and 
second (02) year if they have earned 30 or more semester credits. 

Unclassified Students (UN) are those working for college credit but not enrolled in a degreegranting program. Admission as 
an unclassified student requires the recommendation of the dean of the school in which the student wishes to enroll. 
Unclassified students must meet the same entrance requirements as regular degree students and must meet the same academic 
requirements to continue. If, at a later date, unclassified students wish to change to regular degree status, their credits will be 
evaluated in terms of the requirements of their intended curriculum. 

The Special Student (SP) classification includes Undergraduate Studies and Post- Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) students: 

Undergraduate Studies (UGS) students are United States citizens who have not obtained a baccalaureate degree and who 
take courses but who are not currently admitted to a degree program. To be eligible to register as a UGS student, a person 
should either: (a) have acquired a high school diploma or a GED certificate; not have been suspended from any college or 
university (including NC State) within the last three years; and not be a degree candidate at NC State; or (b) be a high school 
student who has been recommended by his/her school and approved by the Undergraduate Admissions Office to take lower 
level courses. Visiting summer sessions students and visiting interinstitutional students do not necessarily have to meet the 
above criteria. 

PostBaccalaureate Studies (PBS) students are United States citizens who take courses beyond the baccalaureate degree but 
who are not currently admitted to a degree program. This classification is closed to international students with the following 
exceptions: (a) spouses of regularly enrolled NC State degree students; or (b) students enrolled in special programs such as 
AID or FAO who are approved in advance by the International Student Office and the Graduate School. 

All UGS and PBS students must register through the Office of Adult Credit Programs and Summer Sessions which is located 
in the Jane S. McKimmon Center for Extension and Continuing Education. Persons found eligible to study as UGS or PBS 
students are not to assume that they have received formal admission to the University as either undergraduate or graduate 
degree candidates. To become a degree candidate, formal application must be made through the Undergraduate Admissions 
Office or the Graduate School. 

The maximum course load for all UGS and PBS students is two courses plus one physical education course each semester or 
summer session. They may enroll in any course offered by the University, provided they have satisfied any required 
prerequisites and space is available. The academic standards applicable to undergraduate degree candidates at the University, 
including the Continuation of Undergraduate Enrollment Policy, apply to UGS and PBS students. 



33 



COURSE LOAD 

The maximum course load for undergraduate degree students is 2 1 credit hours a semester and two courses plus a physical 
education course in a summer session. To carry more than the maximum, students must obtain the approval of their academic 
adviser and of their college dean. Undergraduate students who propose to register for 19 or more credit hours a semester must 
obtain approval from their academic adviser. First semester freshmen with admissions indices less than 2.000 and continuing 
students with a grade point average less than 2.000 should be advised to carry no more than 16 credit hours in a semester. 

For Undergraduate Studies (UGS) and Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) students the maximum course load is two courses 
plus a physical education course in a regular semester or summer session. Exceptions must be approved by the Admissions 
Office for UGS smdents and by the Registrar for PBS students.. 

The minimum course load for ftjlltime undergraduate degree students is 12 credit hours, except in their final semester when a 
lesser number may be taken if that is all the student needs to fulfill the requirements for a degree. In order to receive financial 
aid a student must meet the minimum course load requirements of the appropriate funding agency. 

The number of hours for which a student is officially enrolled is that number in which the student is enrolled for credit at the 
end of the second week of classes (i.e., the last day to withdraw or drop a course with a refund). 

GRADING SCALE AND GRADE POINTS 

Grade Definition Grade Points Per Credit Hour 

A+ 4.000 

A Excellent 4.000 

A- 3.670 

B+ 3.330 

B Good 3.000 

B- 2.670 

C+ 2.330 

C Satisfactory ("Passing" for graduate students) 2.000 

C- 1.670 

D+ 1.330 

D Marginal 1000 

D- 0.670 

F Failing 0.000 

A grade ofC- satisfies a "grade ofC or better" prerequisite and other "C-Wall" requirements. 

Students classified under the preceding system as SO (or 02) as of the start of Fall 1995 will retain that classification, 
regardless of whether they have attained 30 hours as of the start of Fall 1995. 

GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

The number of credit hours attempted in a semester or summer session (for which grades of A, B, C, D (including 
plus/minus), or F are received) is divided into the total number of grade points earned to arrive at the Grade Point Average 
(GPA). The Grade Point Average will be calculated to three decimal points. 

For example, if a student takes 16 credit hours, earning an A in two 3-credit coursed, a B in one 3-credit course, and a B in 
one 2-credit course, a C in a 3-credit course, and an F in a 2-credit course, the grade point average would be: 

6 (credits of A) x 4 (grade points per credit hour) = 24 

5 (credits of B) x 3 (grade points per credit hour) = 15 

3 (credits of C) x 2 (grade points per credit hour) = 6 

2 (credits of F) x (grade points per credit hour) = ^ 

45 

The total number of grade points earned (45) divided by the number of credit hours attempted (16) equals the grade point 
average, in this case 20813. 

GRADING GUIDELINES 

Instructors are expected to inform students, as a part of the course syllabus distributed at the beginning of the semester as to 
whether the +/- scale or the unmodified (A,B,C,D,F) scale will be used. 

Students enrolled in each section of a multiple section course in which the material, the sequencing of its treatment, and the 
examination are common to all sections should be graded on the same scale. 

34 



Exemption 

Any student registered in a degree program during a regular semester prior to 1994 Fall Semester will not be subject to the 
grade point values associated with plus/minus grading as long as the student remains in the same degree level. (There are 
five degree levels: undergraduate, graduate, professional, Agricultural Institute, and Veterinary Medicine.) Thus, when the 
teacher of a course chooses to award +/- grades, any +/- grades received by such a student will appear on that student's grade 
report and transcript, but the grade points used in calculating the students GPA will not reflect the +/- differentials. (Teachers 
are expected to inform students as a part of their syllabus or outline at the beginning of the course of the grading scale to be 
used.) This adjustment will be make only for students registered in a degree program. Students who are registered as non- 
degree students prior to the fall/summer 1994 will be subject to the full grade point range along with students who enroll as a 
degree student in the fall 1994 semester and thereafter. An exception will be made for students enrolled a Undergraduate 
Studies (UGS) students who had been enrolled in and subsequently suspended from an undergraduate degree program. These 
students will be treated as undergraduate degree students for the purposes of this policy. 

A student who is not subject to grade point values associated with +/- grading will continue to be so until the student enrolls 
in a different degree level. For example, a student who is not subject to grade point values associated with +/- grading as an 
undergraduate student will be subject to grade point values associated with +/- grading upon enrolbnent in a graduate 
program. Once the student is subject to grade point values associated with +/- grading, the grade point values associated with 
+/- grading in all future terms even if the student returns to the student's original degree level. 

Whether or not a student is subject to the grade point values associated with +/- grading will not be affected by the length of 
time enrolled or by breaks in enrollment. Students pursuing additional degrees in the same academic level will maintain their 
exemption status. 

The exemption stated above will end with the 1998 Fall Semester when grade point values associated with +/- grading will be 
in effect for all students regardless of their initial enrolbnent date. 

The following grades are not used in the calculation of grade point averages. 

S Satisfactory (Credit-only and certain other courses) 

U Unsatisfactory (Credit-only and certain other courses) 

CR Credit by Examination or Advanced Placement 

fN Incomplete 

LA Temporarily Late 

AU Audit 

NR No Recognition Given for Audit 

W Withdraw or Late Drop 

DESCRIPTION OF LETTER GRADES 

D-Marginai. This grade is used to recognize that a student's performance was marginal but clearly better than that of 
students who receive an F. 

F-Failing. This grade is used to indicate that the student has failed the course. 

S-Satisfactory. This grade is used as a passing grade to be awarded only when the quality of the student's work is judged to 
be C- or higher level. It is used as the passing grade for students who are taking free elective courses under the credit-only 
option. It may also be used for certain courses such as orientation courses, seminars, and research problems, in which regular 
grades are not appropriate. 

U-Unsatisfactory. This grade is used to indicate that the student is not to receive credit for a credit-only or other course for 
which the passing grade would be S (Satisfactory). 

CR-Credit. This grade is used by the registrar to indicate course credit received by examination or advanced placement as 
certified by appropriate departments or colleges. This grade shall be awarded only when the advanced placement testing 
indicates that the quality if the student's work in the course would have been expected to be of C- or higher level. 

35 



IN-Incomplete. This grade is used as a temporarv grade. At the discretion of the instructor, students may be given an IN 
grade for work not completed because of a serious interruption in their work not caused by their own negligence. An /.V must 
not be used, however, as a substitute for an F when the student's performance in the course is deserving of an F. An IN is 
only appropriate when the student's record in the course is such that the successful completion of particular assignments, 
projects, or tests missed as a result of a documented serious event would enable that student to pass the course. Work 
undertaken to make up the IN grade should be limited to the missed work 

An FN grade must be made up by the end of the ne.xt regular semester (not including summer sessions) in which the student is 
enrolled, provided that this period is not longer than twelve months from the end of the semester or summer session in which 
the work was due. In the event that the instructor or department offering the course is not able to provide a student with the 
opportunity to make up the incomplete work by the end of the next regular semester in which the student is enrolled or within 
twelve months, whichever is shorter, the instructor or department offering the course must notify the student and the 
Department of Registration and Records of the date of the extended deadline for removing the IN grade. 

Any In grade not removed by the end of the next regular semester in which the student is enrolled or by the end of twelve 
months, whichever is shorter, or by the extended deadline authorized by the instructor or the department offering the course 
and recorded by the Department of Registration and Records will automatically become a Failing (F) grade and will count as 
a course attempted. 

Students must not register again for any courses in which they have IN grades; such registration does not remove IN grades, 
and the completion of the course on the second occasion will automatically result in an F for the incomplete course. 

When a graduating senior receives an In, the following procedures apply: ( I ) if the course is needed for graduation, the 
student will not be allowed to graduate until the work has been made up, and (2) if the course is not needed for graduation, 
the college dean must notify, in writing, the Department of Registration and Records either (a) that the course and the IN 
grade are to be deleted from the student's record; or (b) that permission has been given for the IN to remain and that a 
deadline has been established for the completion of the course. In the event that the course is subsequently not completed 
satisfactorily, the college dean shall notify, in writing, the Department of Registration and Records that the course and the IN 
grade should be deleted from the student's record or that the IN should be changed to F. 

LA-Temporarily Late. An emergency symbol to be used only when grades cannot be reported on time by the teaching 
department or the professor. The LA differs from the IN grade in that the student receiving the LA has completed the work of 
the course including the examination. 

The LA should not be used by a teaching department or the instructor unless it is absolutely necessary. When it is used the 
following procedure applies: 

1 . The Grade Report Roll(s) must be returned at the regularly scheduled time with the LA clearly marked; and 

2. A Grade Change Report form must be secured from the Department of Registration and Records, completed, and 
returned at the earliest possible time and not later than 15 days after the examination. 

The semester grade reports of those students who receive an LA will not be complete. This situation often causes students to 
be uninformed as to their academic eligibility and as to the correctness of their schedule for the following semester. 

AU - Audit. Given in recognition of successfijl completion of a course audit. 
NR - No Recognition. Given for unsuccessful completion of a course audit. 

Students wishing to audit a course before or after taking it for credit must have the approval of their adviser and of the 
department offering the course. Auditors are expected to attend class regularly. The degree to which an auditor must 
participate in class beyond regular attendance is optional with the instructor; any such requirements should be clearly 
explained in writing to the audit or at the beginning of the semester. Should the instructor conclude that poor attendance has 
resulted in an auditor's gaining little from the course, the instructor should mark NR (no recognition given for an audit) on the 
final grade report. Students who have taken a course for audit may, with their adviser's approval enroll in the course for credit 
during a subsequent semester or summer session. For tuition cost purposes, audits are treated as full credit value. For all other 
purposes, hours of audit do not count in calculating undergraduate course loads. 

Note: Veteran's benefits are governed by Veterans Administration regulation concerning audits. Public Law 94502 (G.l. Bill) 
and Public Law 64 (sons and daughters of deceased or disabled veterans) consider only courses being taken for credit when 
determining a student's load for benefit purposes. For information, contact the Veterans Affairs Office, 1000 Harris Hall. 
(9l9)5l5-3n4H 

W - Withdrawal/Late Drop. Used on students' grade reports and transcripts to indicate all courses for which they have 
received official approval to drop or from which they have received official approval to withdraw after the deadlines for 
dropping. 

36 



CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Undergraduate students currently registered at NC State (degree, unclassified, or Lifelong Education) may request an 
examination for course credit in a course whether enrolled in that course or not, under the conditions described below. 
Students must initiate a request with their adviser (except when a teaching department awards credit based upon group testing 
for placement purposes). Should the adviser approve, the student must arrange for the examination with the department 
offering the course. The department may administer the examination in any manner pertinent to the materials of the course. 
Departments are encouraged to offer credit by examination in all courses but have the prerogative of excluding certain 
courses which are demonstrably unsuited for credit by examination. 

The academic standards for credit by examination will be commensurate with the academic standards for the course. If a 
student's performance on the examination is judged to be of C- or higher quality, the department will notify the Department 
of Registration and Records on a Grade Change Report that the student has received Credit by Examination for the course. 
The Department of Registration and Records will enter the appropriate number of credit hours on the student's permanent 
academic record. Credits earned through Credit by Examination are not used in the computation of a student's grade point 
average. 

The Department of Registration and Records will post course credit by examination to a student's permanent academic record 
only if that student is currently registered at NC State. However, if the course credit by examination would enable a student 
to complete the requirements for a degree, that student would not have to be registered in order to receive the credit. 

If a student fails to achieve C- or higher quality work on an attempted credit by examination, no action is required other than 
the department's notifying the student. However, that student is not eligible for another such examination in the same course. 

Once a student has failed a course or has completed for credit or audit more than fifty percent of a course, the student may not 
attempt credit by examination for that course. Under unusual circumstances, exceptions may be made upon the written 
recommendation of the student's adviser and the approval of the department offering the course. A student who receives 
credit by examination in a course in which that student is currently enrolled must officially drop that course no later than 
midsemester. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION THROUGH INDEPENDENT STUDIES 

Persons who are not currently enrolled on campus and who have gained through study or experience, knowledge of the 
content of undergraduate credit courses offered through Independent Studies may (with the approval of the Independent 
Studies staff and the academic department offering a course) receive credit for that course by special examination. Students 
may request approval to attempt credit by examination by completing and submitting a form available from Independent 
Studies, The University of North Carolina, Box 1020, The Friday Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-1020, (919) 
962-1104. 

Currently enrolled students are not eligible for credit by examination through Independent Studies. These students should go 
directly to the appropriate academic department to request credit by examination under the regular procedures in effect on 
campus. 

CREDIT ONLY OPTION FOR FREE ELECTIVE COURSES 

Each undergraduate student has the option to count toward graduation requirements a maximum of 12 semester hours in the 
category of credit-only courses (exclusive of physical education and other courses authorized to be graded on 
Satisfactory /Unsatisfactory basis). The student may select as credit-only any course offered by the University except those in 
Military Science and Aerospace Studies. The selected courses must be included under the free elective category of the 
specific curriculum in which the student is enrolled. The student will be responsible for attendance, assignments, and 
examinations. 

The student's performance in a credit only course will be reported as S (satisfactory grade for credit only course and given 
when course work is equivalent to C- or better) or U (no credit grade for credit only course). The grade for a credit only 
course will have no effect on the student's Grade Point Average. The course and its grade will be counted in the cumulative 
hours attempted. Credit only courses do not count in the calculation of eligibility for the Semester Dean's List, which requires 
either twelve hours or fifteen hours of course work for which grade points are earned. 

Lifelong Education students may take on a credit only basis any course for which they satisfy prerequisites. Students should 
be aware that many graduate and professional schools evaluate credit-only courses for which "U" grades were awarded as 
failing grades. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

Transcripts of college course credit for new transfer students and for NC State students who have taken course work at 
another institution are evaluated by the dean of the appropriate school to determine how the work applies toward fulfilling the 

37 



graduation requirements of each student's intended curriculum. Students admitted to an NC State undergraduate degree 
program who wish to take courses at another institution must obtain prior endorsement from their academic department and 
prior wrinen approval from their school dean in order to insure that the transfer credits will apply toward ftilfilling specific 
graduation requirements. Transfer credit is not recorded on former students' permanent records until after they have been 
readmitted and have re-enrolled. 

ACADEMIC HONORS 

High ranking students in their freshman year are eligible for membership in Phi Eta Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta. Both of 
these national scholastic honoraries require a 3.500 semester grade point average or better during the first semester or a 
cumulative average of 3.500 for both semesters during the freshman year. Juniors ranking in the top three percent of their 
class, seniors ranking in the top six percent of their class, and outstanding graduate students are eligible for election to 
membership in Phi Kappi Phi, the university's most prestigious campus-wide scholastic honor society. Outstanding 
undergraduate and graduate students majoring in the arts and sciences are also eligible for election to membership in Phi Beta 
Kappa. 

Semester Dean's List - A fulltime undergraduate student who earns a semester average of 3.500 or better on 12 to 14 hours 
of course work for which grade points are earned or a semester average of 3.250 or better on 15 or more hours of course work 
for which grade points are earned will be placed on the Dean's List for that semester. Students are not eligible for the Dean's 
List in any semester in which they receive an NC or IN grade. When IN grades are resolved, however, students who are 
otherwise eligible shall be added retroactively to the Dean's List for that semester. Dean's List recognition shall be noted on 
the student's semester grade report and permanent academic record. 

Graduation with Honors - Undergraduate degree honor designations are: 

Cum Laude - for GPA 3.250 through 3.499 
Magna Cum Laude - for GPA 3.500 through 3.749 
Summa Cum Laude - for GPA 3.750 and above 

To be eligible for degree honor designations students must have completed at least two semesters and al least 30 credit hours 
at NC State. 

Valedictorian, Salutatorian, and Highest Ranking Scholar in a College - To be eligible for consideration as valedictorian, 
salutatorian, or highest ranking scholar in a college, an undergraduate student must have received at least 100 academic 
credits at NC State (including credit by examination, advanced placement credit, and SAJ courses.) These 100 credits may 
include no more than 20 transfer credits through programs officially sponsored by NC State. Specifically, these programs are 
Cooperating Raleigh Colleges, National Student Exchange, International Student Exchange, NC State sponsored study 
abroad programs, and the affiliated hospital programs in Medical Technology. All students whose accumulated grade point 
averages, based on all courses anempted at NC State, make them eligible for one of these honors, shall be so recognized. 
That is, in the case of ties, more than one student will receive the honor. However, in the case of ties for valedictorian, no 
salutatorian will be recognized. 

GRADE REPORTS 

The Department of Registration provides four methods in which students may gain access to term grades: 

• WORLD WIDE WEB - http://www2.ncsu.edu/ncsu/reg_records/ 

• TELEPHONE -899-ncsu (6278) 

(Grades are available through TRACS at any time while the TRACS system is open) Grades are reported within 24 to 
48 hours after instructors subnit them to the University Registrar's Office. 

Toll Free - 1-877-MY GRADE (694-6494). Grades are provided toll free and are available telephonically during the 
exam period until approximately two weeks in the next succeeding semester. 

• IN WRITING - A printed copy of semester grades will be issued only at the written request or authorization of the 
student concerned. The written request should by submitted after the first day of classes, but before the last day of 
classes. 

• IN PERSON - Students may come in person to the Department of Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall, and 
request a printed copy of grades for their last enrolled term. 

Change of Name or Address - It is the student's responsibility to inform Registration and Records of any changes in name 
or address. Failure to do this may prevent prompt delivery of important University correspondence. News stories about 
Dean's List students are sent to North Carolina newspapers based on hometown information furnished by Registration and 
Records. 



38 



TRANSCRIPTS OF ACADEMIC RECORD 

A transcript is an exact copy of a student's permanent academic record at the time it is issued. A fee of five dollars is charged 
for each transcript. No official transcript may be issued to or for a student who is indebted to the university until such 
indebtedness has been paid or satisfactorily adjusted. Official transcripts are issued only upon the written request of the 
student to Registration and Records, Box 73 1 3, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-73 13. 

DOUBLE DEGREES 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for more than one bachelor's degree may, upon the 
recommendation of their deans, be awarded two bachelor's degrees at the same or at different commencement exercises. To 
earn two degrees students register in one school or department and, with the cooperation of the second school or department, 
work out their program to cover the requirements for both. Students must file an approved Double Majors Only Curriculum 
Change Form with Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall. An Application for Degree Form must be submitted for each 
degree. 

INTRACAMPUS TRANSFERS (Curriculum Change) 

Undergraduate students wishing to change from one curriculum to another must report to the dean's office of the college 
offering the curriculum in which entrance is desired and request acceptance into the new college or curriculum. 

A student who has attempted fewer than twelve credit hours at NC State may transfer to another curriculum provided that 
student meets the admission requirements of the intended new curriculum. A student who has attempted twelve or more credit 
hours at NC State may transfer to another curriculum provided that student is eligible to do so under the intracampus 
transfer policy which pertains to the intended curriculum. 

If acceptance is approved, a Curriculum Change Form will be issued, bearing the signature of the accepting dean. If the 
former curriculum was in a different college, the Curriculum Change Form should be submitted for the signature of the 
releasing dean with the request that all records be transferred to the new college and department. From the standpoint of 
advising, registration, and adding and dropping courses, the student is considered to be in the new curriculum as soon as the 
Curriculum Change Form is completed and filed with the Department of Registration and Records and the records of the 
student have been transferred to the new department. 

ACADEMIC STATUS 

CONTINUATION OF UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT 

This policy is effective for all undergraduate students as of the begiiuiing of Fall 1995. See the 1999 Undergraduate Catalog 
(hardcopy) or view at the following World Wide Web address: 
http://www2.ncsu.edu/ncsu/provost/info/publications/ugcat/ 

Provisions are made for students who were on Academic Warning 1 .Academic Warning 11, and Probation, and for students 
who were suspended as of the end of Spring 1995 and who remained suspended as of the end of Summer Session 11 1995 are 
described under the heading "Transition of Continuing Students to the Continuation of Undergraduate Enrollment Academic 
Policy." 

MINIMUM ELIGIBILITY STANDARD 

The minimum eligibility for continued enrollment for any undergraduate student is defined as achieving the required 
cumulative grade point attempted at NC State plus transferred according to the Schedule of Performance Requirements for 
Continuing Undergraduate Enrollment, referred to hereinafter as the continuation schedule. 

Schedule of Performance Requirements For Continuing Undergraduate Enrollment 

Credit Hours Attempted at NCSU Plus Credit Minimum Required Cumulative Grade Point Average 

Hours Transferred on ail Courses Taken at NC State 

1-35 1.500 

36-47 1.600 

48-59 1.700 

60-71 1.800 

72-83 1.900 

84 or more 2.000 



39 



Undergraduate students who, at the end of any regular semester, do not meet the minimum standards shown in the 
continuation schedule will not be allowed to continue their enrollment at the University during subsequent fall and spring 
semesters, with the following exceptions: 

no student will be suspended until the end of the student's second regular semester at NC State; 

any student who begins a given semester with a cumulative GPA of 2.000 or better will be eligible to continue in the 

next regular semester in which they seek enrollment regardless of academic performance in that given semester; 

students who are eligible to continue at the end of a spring semester will be eligible to continue into the following fall, 

regardless of summer session performance; 

students w ill be eligible to continue their enrollment until they have attempted at least twelve hours at NC State; 

suspended students re-admined on appeal will be eligible to enroll on Academic Probation. 

Every student with a cumulative GPA below 2.000 will be in one of three academic status: Academic Warning, Academic 
Suspension, or Academic Probation. 

ACADEMIC WARNING 

Every student who meets the foregoing conditions but whose cumulative grade point average is less than 2.000, the minimum 
for graduation, will be on Academic Warning Status. The Timely Advising Requirement applies to all students on Academic 
Warning Status. 

ACADEMIC SUSPENSION 

Students who do not meet the foregoing conditions for eligibility to continue enrollment will be on Academic Suspension 
Status. Suspended students may be readmitted automatically as provided in the section on "Readmission of Suspended 
Students." Suspended students not eligible for automatic readmission may appeal to the University Admissions Committee 
for readmission; they should be encouraged to do so if they feel that circumstances which led to the academic difficulty have 
changed or can be better accommodated by the student. If re-admitted, the student will be eligible to enroll for one semester 
on Academic Probation Status. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION 

Suspended students may appeal to the University Admissions Committee for readmission on Academic Probation Status for 
one regular semester. Students will not be considered in good academic standing while on Academic Probation Status. 
Probationary students are subject to the same timely advising requirements as described above for students on Academic 
Warning. Those with significant involvement in extracurricular activities should be advised to carefully consider the impact 
of these activities on their ability to succeed academically during the probationary semester and to make adjustments 
accordingly. The University Admissions Committee may prescribe additional requirements as a condition of re-admission. 
Students who do not complete the probationary semester with a cumulative GPA above the suspension level will return to 
Academic Suspension Status. 

TIMELY ADVISING REQUIREMENT 

All students on Academic Warning Status or Academic Probation Status are required to meet with their academic advisers 
during the first four weeks of classes in regular semesters to review their academic situations and to formulate or review and 
revise as needed their plans of study. Any student in either of these statuses who does not comply with these requirements to 
consult with the faculty adviser will not be allowed to register for and continue enrollment at the University during 
subsequent fall and spring semesters unless the cumulative GPA is 2.000 or greater at the end of the semester in which the 
requirement was not met. 

READMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED DEGREE STUDENTS 

An undergraduate degree student who fails to enrol! or attend at all, during any regular semester, is considered a "former 
degree student and must re-apply for admission to continue. Readmission applications should be submitted as soon as 
possible but no later than 30 days prior to the date of desired enrollment. Former students returning should be aware that 
enrollment restrictions may be imposed at any time which may affect their readmission. A student who received a bachelor's 
degree must: apply for admission to the Graduate School, register as a Post-Baccalaureate Studies Student through Lifelong 
Education; or apply for readmission as a candidate for a second bachelor's degree or professional degree or as an 
undergraduate Unclassified Student. 

A non-refundable S25 fee is required for all applications. 



40 



READMISSION FOR STUDENTS ELIGIBLE TO CONTINUE 

Students who were eligible to continue at NC State at the time of leaving are eligible to be readmitted to their former program 
provided they have a grade point average of 2.000 on all courses taken at NC State and provided there is space available. 

A student who was eligible to continue at the time of leaving who has subsequently taken work at another institution and 
earned less than a C- average on such work must complete a readmission form and write a letter of petition to the University 
Admissions Committee. 

A student who was eligible to continue at the time of leaving and whose grade point average is less than 2.000 will be: 

• Considered for readmission on Academic Warning status if the student's GPA is not lower than the level required to be 
eligible to continue under the current policy; 

• Considered for readmission on Academic Probation Status for one semester if the student's GPA is below the level 
required to be eligible to continue under the current policy. Considered for readmission on Academic Probation Status, if 
the student's grade point average on all courses taken at NC State is such that the student was or would have been 
suspended. 

A former student returning who desires a change of curriculum must have their records transferred to the new school/college 
and submit a properly validated Curriculum Change Form to the Department of Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall, 
before readmission can be processed. 

READMISSION FOR SUSPENDED STUDENTS 

Automatic Readmission 

A student who is academically suspended may do one or all of the following: 

• enroll in NC State courses during any number of summer sessions at NC State, 

• enroll in NC State courses through independent studies, and/or 

• enroll in NC courses via Cable or courses via videocassette. 

For further information regarding Cable or videocassette class, contact the Office of Telecommunications, 218 McKimmon 
Center. 515-7730. 

Courses taken at an institution other than NC State or offered by some other institution through Independent Studies do not 
affect a student's suspension status at NC State. 

When by one or all of these methods a suspended student has improved his or her academic standing to the extent that the 
student is no longer academically suspended, that student becomes automatically eligible for readmission to a regular 
semester and no letter of appeal to the University Admissions Committee by the student is necessary. 

Appeal To University Admissions Committee 

A student who is academically suspended, who is ineligible for automatic readmission as described above, may appeal to the 
University Admissions Committee for readmission. Such students should be encouraged to do so if they feel that 
circumstances which led to the academic difficulty have changed or can now be accommodated successfully. If granted 
readmission, the student will be eligible to enroll for one semester on Academic Probation Status. A letter must be written to 
the Committee stating: the reasons for former academic difficulty with an explanation of extenuating circumstances; why the 
student believes he/she can now successfully meet all degree requirements within a reasonable length of time; the summer 
sessions, Independent Studies, or NC State off-campus courses that have been completed; the address and telephone number 
to be used by the Admissions Committee's for notification of a decision. The Admissions Committee will not act on the 
appeal of any student currently enrolled in any summer sessions. Independent Studies or off-campus courses. 

Letters of appeal should be mailed to: Department of Registration and Records, Attention: Admissions Committee, NCSU, 
Box 7313, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7313. The letter must reach the Department of Registration and Records by the 
following deadlines: 

• no later than two weeks before the first day of classes in the fall semester for students who did not attend summer school 
or who attended first summer session only; 

• no later than one week before the first day of classes in the fall semester for students who attended second summer 
session; and 

• no later than one week before the first day of classes in the spring semester. 

The Admissions Committee meets prior to the first day of classes. All material must be received in accordance with the 
above dates. 

41 



Appeal To University Admissions Committee By Students Who Have Not Been Enrolled At Nc State For Three Or 
More Years (Contractual Readmission) 

After not being enrolled at NC State (excluding summer sessions, Independent Studies, and NC State ofT-campus courses) for 
a continuous three-year period or longer, a student whose former academic record at NC State was such that the student was 
suspended or would have been suspended under current policies, may petition the University Admissions Committee for 
contractual readmission. 

The Committee will decide each case on its individual merits with special regard to the student's written appeal, the 
productive use of the three or more intervening years, evidence of motivation and achievement based on any academic work 
done during those three or more years, and a supporting letter from the department offering the curriculum into which the 
student requests admission. This letter must contain a proposed plan of study agreed to and signed by the student, the 
department head, and the dean. If the curriculum into which the student requests admission is different from that in which the 
student was last enrolled, the petition to the Admissions Committee must also be accompanied by a Curriculum Change Form 
approved by the accepting dean. If a contractual readmission is approved, the following conditions apply: 

1 . the student's entire academic record at NC State will be recorded on any subsequent transcript, including a grade 
point average on all work attempted at NC State. 

2. for courses attempted prior to readmission, only work of C- or better will count toward fulfilling graduation 
requirements, providing that such courses meet current curriculum requirements. 

3. for purposes of suspension and eligibility for graduation, a second grade point average will be calculated based 
only on courses that are attempted after readmission. Total hours for graduation and suspension will be based on all 
work at NC State after readmission plus former work of C- or better that is acceptable to the department plus hours 
transferred from other institutions. 

4. the student must maintain an overall grade point average of 2.000 or better on all courses attempted after 
readmission. 

5. students who fail to achieve an overall grade point average of 2.000 will lose their contractual readmission status. 
Their status for subsequent work as a degree student at NC State shall be determined on the basis of total hours 
anempted at NC State plus transferred hours and their grade point average calculated using all courses attempted at 
NC State. 

6. a student may be readmitted under this option only once. 

Once a student has received notice of readmission, the student should register using telephonic registration. The student's 
personal ID number will be included in the notice of readmission. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Students who wish to drop all the courses for which they are registered must withdraw from the University for the remainder 
of the semester or summer session in which they are enrolled. Students who have registered and prepaid are considered to be 
registered and must be officially withdrawn, unless they have notified the University prior to the beginning of the first day of 
classes that they wish to have their registration canceled. 

It is highly recommended, but not required, that students considering withdrawal consult their faculty adviser or departmental 
coordinator of advising. The withdrawal process is as follows: 

Degree candidates and Unclassified students initiate the official withdrawal process with the Counseling Center, Student 
Health Center, 2815 Cates Avenue, 2"'' floor, 515-2423. Parental approval to withdraw may be required for single students 
who are under eighteen. Lifelong Education students contact the Office of Adult Credit Programs & Summer Sessions, 
Registration Desk, McKimmon Center, 5 1 5-2265. NC State students carrying course work at another campus under the 
interinstitutional arrangement must contact the Department of Registration and Records, 1008 Harris Hall, 515-2577, to 
initiate the paperwork necessary for removal from the class roll at the other institution. Students visiting from other 
institutions who are registered for NC State course work under the Interinstitutional arrangement must initiate withdrawal on 
their home campus and contact the NC State Department of Registration and Records. 



42 



REPEATING COURSES 

COURSE REPEAT POLICY 

♦ Students who repeat a course, regardless if the grade previously was made, will have both grades counted in their 
cumulative grade point average. 

♦ Undergraduate students may be allowed as many semester hours as are appropriate in the departmental curriculum for 
courses that are titled seminar, special problems, special topics, independent study or research (and are usually numbered 
490-499 or 590-599 and cover topics different from those studied when the courses were taken previously. Unless a 
course satisfies one or the other of the above conditions, the semester hours will be counted only once toward the number 
of hours required for graduation even though students repeat and pass the course both times. 

♦ The adviser's approval is required for students to repeat any course previously passed with a C-; no approval can be 
given for a grade of A or B. Nor will it be given when: students wish to repeat a lower division course that they have 
passed with a grade of C- or better after having successfiilly completed an advanced course dealing with the same subject 
matter; students wish to repeat a lower level course that they have passed with a C- or better which is a prerequisite for 
an advanced course that they had already successfully completed; students wish to take an introductory course after they 
have successftilly completed an advanced course dealing with similar material. 

♦ Students must not register again for any courses in which they have IN grades; such registration does not remove IN 
grades; and the completion of the course on the second occasion will automatically result in an F for the uncompleted 
course. 

FIRST YEAR COURSE REPEAT POLICY 

For courses first attempted in Fall 1995 and afterwards. 

The first year course repeat policy is one of forgiveness that helps new NC State undergraduate students maintain good 
academic standing. The policy is necessary because new students lack familiarity with the University, and as a result, are 
more likely to make errors in their choice of courses and total course load. 

EFFECTS 

♦ The eligible student who repeats a course while electing that the first year course repeat policy apply, will have the grade 
points and the credit hours attempted and earned on the first completion of the course removed from the calculation of 
the cumulative grade point average and from the calculation of the total hours attempted regardless of the grade earned 
on the second attempt. The modification of the cumulative grade point average which will result from the removal of the 
grade points and credit hours attempted and earned on the first completion of the course will be calculated and recorded 
on the student's record after the second completion of the course. 

♦ The course title and grade for the first completion will be shown on the official record with a code (R) to indicate that it 
was repeated and that the first grade was removed from the computation of the cumulative grade point average. 

♦ The recorded grade point average of the student for the semester in which the course was originally taken will not be 
changed. 

♦ Repeating a course and exercising the first year course repeat policy does not retroactively change the status of the 
student as to semester academic hours, academic warning, probation, or suspension in prior semesters. 

♦ Many graduate and professional schools recompute grade point averages in the process of considering an applicant for 
admission to such programs. This recomputation of grade point averages may include restoring the cumulative grade 
point average effects of initial attempts at courses repeated under this policy. 

ELIGIBILITY 

1 . the initial attempt and the repeat under this policy must be an NC State course; 

2. the course being repeated was completed for the first time after the Summer Session II 1995; 

3. the course being repeated must be at the 100- or 200-level. 

4. the student received a grade below C- in the course that is to be repeated; 

5. both attempts of the course were for letter grades; no unsuccessfiil audits or credit-only attempts may be repeated nor 
may repeats under the policy be made for audit or credit-only; 

6. the student has not received credit for an advanced course dealing with the same subject matter as the course being 
repeated; 

7. the first attempt of the course must have occurred within 12 months of the student's initial enrollment in any 
classification at NC State; this period is not lengthened by voluntary or involuntary failure to enroll in subsequent 
semesters of summer sessions, nor by enrolling at less than a minimum ftill- time load following the initial date of 
enrollment; 

8. the second attempt is for the same course or for an approved substitute course. 

43 



9. the second attempt occurs in a regular semester or summer session which ends within 12 months of the completion of the 
first attempt of the course; if the course is not available during that period or if the student is not enrolled when it is 
available, then the second anempt must occur in the next regular semester during which the student is enrolled at NC 
State and the course is available: 

10. the total number of courses repeated by the student under this policy will not exceed two (2) courses nor will the total of 
the hours of such courses exceed eight (8) hours, nor will the total number of courses repeated under this policy 
combined with those repeated under the Course Repeat Without Penalty Policy (see 1995 Undergraduate Catalog) 
exceed three (3) courses, nor will the total hours of such courses exceed twelve (12) hours; 

1 1 . the Notice of Exercise of First Year Course Repeat Policy is filed by the student with the Department of Registration and 
Records on or before the "last day to drop a course without a grade for courses at the 400 level and below" of the 
semester or summer session in which the course is repeated. 

PROCEDURES 

1 . students are advised to consult with their academic advisers in making the decision to elect a course repeat under this 
policy. 

2. the student must submit a Notice of Exercise of First Year Course Repeat Policy to the Department of Registration and 
Records on or before the last day to drop a course without a grade at the 400 level or below of the semester or summer 
session in which the course is repeated. Forms may be obtained from faculty advisers, departmental coordinators of 
advising, associate deans for academic programs, and the Department of Registration and Records. 

CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT 

All students who enroll at NC State are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct. This code... "sets out the 
kind of behavior that disrupts and inhibits the normal fiinctioning of the University, and what action it will take to protect 
the community from such disruption." Academic and Non-Academic Misconduct, both on and off campus are addressed 
in the Code. Students charged and found guilty of violating the Code of Student Conduct will receive sanctions that may 
range from an oral reprimand to expulsion from the University. For more information contact the Office of Student 
Conduct at 5 15-2963 or access the Code at the following World Wide Web site: 
http://www2.ncsu.eduyncsuystud_affairs/policies/ 

NC STATE STUDENT SERVICES 

ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE 

The University offers students an accident and health insurance program. The insurance covers the surgical, accident, and 
hospital needs of participating students as a supplement to Student Health Services. Each year complete information is 
available to students at the start of the fall semester. Students are strongly encouraged to have medical insurance protection 
of some type. 

THE UNIVERSITY CAREER CENTER 

The University Career Center's goal is two-fold: to assist students in developing their career objectives and to provide a link 
for students to the employment world. It offers assistance to all students at the University on a year round basis. 

To assist in career development the Center provides individual counseling and small group career decision-making seminars. 
Center staff promote, arrange, and coordinate job interviews between students and employer representatives, schedule visits 
of recruiters to campus, refer student resumes to requesting employers, and maintain job vacancy announcements. In 
addition, career advisors recommend contacts with employers, and maintain job vacancy announcements. In addition, career 
advisors recommend contacts with employers not visiting campus, conduct information sessions on the job search process, 
and maintain the Center's home page. The Center maintains an extensive library of career and job information. In addition, 
the Center helps students find internships, summer, and part-time jobs related to their career objectives. 

CHAPLAINS' COOPERATIVE MINISTRY 

The Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry at NC State is an interfaith organization which both supports individual campus 
ministries and plans jointly sponsored interfaith programs for students, faculty, and staff Its members, both ordained and 
non-ordained, strive to be leaders within the University as inquiry, dialogue, and development trust are engaged with trust at 
all levels. 



44 



The office has a prominent location off the first floor lobby of the Talley Student Center and the membership is through the 
Department of Student Development. Ministries within member groups support the spiritual and emotional growth of 
students through scriptural studies, worship, meals, socials, various outings, retreats, mission trips, counseling, service 
projects, and opportunities for leadership. Following is a list of current phone numbers and addresses: 



Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry 

1201 Talley Student Center, Box 7306, NCSU, 27695 

515-2414 

Department of Student Development (University Liaison) 
2009 Harris Hall, Box 7314, NCSU, 27695 
515-2441 

Baptist 

2702 Hillsborough St., 27607 

Campus Christian Fellowship 
P.O. Box 5182, 27650 
859-6800 

Campus Crusade for Christ 
1912 Myron Dr., 27607 
782-3393 

Catholic 
Doggett Center, 
600 Bilyeu St., 27606 
833-9668 

Cloud and Fire Express (coffeehouse) 
2512 Hillsborough St., Raleigh, 27607 
834-5229 

Disciples of Christ 

718 Hillsborough St., 27603 

832-7112 

Episcopal 

Sarah F. Cheshire House, 2208 Hope St., 27607 

834-2428 



Grace Community Church 
201 Coorsdale Dr., Cary, 2751 1 
467-7670 

Hillel 

8210 Creedmoor Rd. #104, Raleigh, 27613 

676-2200 

InterVarsity 

1 1 17-2A Crab Orchard Dr., 27606 

854-1160 

Lutheran 

2723 Clark Ave., 27607 

828-1433 

Methodist 

2503 Clark Ave., 27607 

833-1861 

Metropolitan Community Church 

St. John's, 805 Glenwood Ave., Box 5626, 27650 

834-2611 

Presbyterian 

27 Home St.,Box 5635, 27650 
834-5184 

REACH Campus Ministries 
700 Brooks Ave., 27607 
821-2400 

Unitarian Universalist 
3313 Wade Ave., 27607 
781-7635 



COUNSELING 

The Counseling Center assists individuals in gaining a better understanding of themselves. Psychologists, professional 
counselors, and psychiatrists are available to work with students who desire assistance with concerns such as choosing a 
career, academic planning, identifying and overcoming educational difficulties, developing greater self-understanding, 
developing more satisfying personal relations, and coping with stress or emotional crisis. All counseling is strictly 
confidential. 

In addition to individual counseling, workshops and support groups are offered throughout the year in a variety of areas, 
including vocational exploration and stress reduction. 

The Counseling Center is located in Student Health Center, 2815 Cates Avenue, 2"'' floor. Appointments may be scheduled 
by calling (9 1 9) 5 1 5-2423 or stopping by our office. 

FOOD SERVICE 

University Dining, the University's food service department, has 13 campus locations to serve students, faculty, and staff. 
Awarded the Ivy Award by Restaurant & Institutions magazine in 1988, University Dining is recognized nationally for 
exciting and innovative concepts in campus dining. 

The Fountain Dining Hall, located on West Campus serves as the main hub for the meal-plan program. The Dining Hall 
offers its patrons an all-you-can-eat menu in a modem, comfortable atmosphere that breaks from the traditional cafeteria- 



45 



style service. The Dining Hall is open seven days a week, with brunch and dinner served on weekends. A registered dietician 
is on staff to assist with dietary restrictions and to provide nutritional or diet counseling. 

Meal Plans. Freshmen who live in the residence halls are required to participate in one of many University Dining meal 
plans, each tailored to meet different needs. All seven meal plans are designed with both structure and flexibility. The 
structured element of the program is a set number of meals served in an all-you-can-eat fashion in the main Dining Hall. The 
flexible element is a Cash-Points system. Part of the meal plan purchase price is directly converted to a non-refundable Cash- 
Points account that can be used only at University Dining locations on campus. Cash-Points are a dollar-for-dollar 
equivalence built into each meal plan to allow students the flexibility of eating meals away from the Dining Hall. The meal 
program is designed to allow students to chose the number of structured meals and the amount of flexible Cash-Points. 

University Dining takes pride in offering quality food and services designed specifically to meet the wants and needs of 
students. These seven meal plans provide students with varied menu choices and the utmost in convenience. For more 
information on meal plans contact the AllCampus Office, West Dunn Building, (919) 515-3090. 

DISABILITY SERVICES 

Students requiring special assistance because of visual, hearing, or motor disabilities should contact Disability Services for 
Students (DSS), NC State, Box 73 1 2, Student Health Center, 2815 Cates Avenue, 1 " floor, Raleigh, NC 27695-73 1 2. (9 1 9) 
515-7653 (VoiceATDD). Interpreter, tutorial, note taker and/or reader services are available by contacting the center. 

Direct services for all learning disabled students, such as educational counseling and arrangements for appropriate academic 
support, can also be initiated by DSS. 

Those students needing special assistance in scheduling courses should make contact as far as possible in advance of 
preregistration deadlines. 

HEALTH 

The University seeks to safeguard the health of the students in every way possible. Student Health Services, located in the 
Student Health Center, offers medical care to students on an outpatient basis. The facility is staffed by fiilltime physicians, 
registered nurses and other medical support personnel. 

The Health Service is open for outpatient medical care from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday - Friday and 8 a.m. to noon on 
weekends during fall and spring semesters (excluding breaks). Physicians maintain regular office hours Monday - Friday and 
are on call at other times. A nurse staffed clinic is operated during evenings and weekends. Patients are seen by appointment 
(515-7107); Gynecology (515-7762). Summer session hours are Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

All registered students pay a medical fee which covers outpatient professional services; i.e., visits to a nurse or physician, 
routine laboratory procedures and some medications available in the student pharmacy. There is a nominal charge for x-rays, 
some lab tests, allergy injections, prescription medications and special clinics. Students are responsible for the cost of 
laboratory tests and x-rays which must be performed by an off-campus agency, medications not available in the student 
pharmacy, and expenses incurred when referred to an off-campus physician or hospital. 

All health and medical information is confidential and is not divulged to anyone without the written consent of the patient. 

Health Educators offer a variety of information, programs, and services to students. Health topics include weight control, 
alcohol and drug education, stress management, sexually transmitted diseases, women's issues, and more. Call 5 15- WELL 
(9355) for information. 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING 

The University is currently providing a laundry and dry cleaning facility on campus at reasonable prices. 

BOOKSTORES 

The official campus source for all course-books is the NCSU Bookstore, consisting of the main store, located on East Dunn 
Avenue, the North Campus Shop, located in the lower level of Erdahl Cloyd Annex of the D. H. Hill Library, and the 
Century Shop located in Research III, Centennial Campus. At the main store, the book division provides textbooks, fiction, 
nonfiction, technical and reference titles, publishers' overstock and remainders, college outlines, paperbacks, book reviews, 
periodicals, and calendars. The merchandise division carries school supplies, personal computers with accessories and 
supplies, art and engineering supplies, greeting cards, health and beauty aids, imprinted sportswear, souvenirs, and 
convenience items. Special orders are accepted for books and merchandise. Purchases may be charged by VISA, MasterCard, 
Discover, or AllCampus Money Card. During the opening of fall and spring semesters, the main store is open specified 
evenings, in addition to each Tuesday evening and Saturday when classes are in session. North Campus Shop specializes in 

46 



computer supplies, sale books, magazines, college outlines, greeting cards, souvenirs, gifts, and convenience items. The 
entire operation of the Bookstore is completely self-supporting, with its annual surplus transferred to NC State Scholarship 
Fund. 

TRANSPORTATION 

All vehicles parking on campus during the hours of 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, must display an 
appropriate NC State permit. Freshmen residents and off-campus students living within a one mile radius of campus are not 
eligible for campus parking permits. Permits are distributed through a year-round registration process. As permits become 
available throu^out the year, they are assigned according to a "wait list." Transportation alternatives include the University's 
Wolfline bus service, motorcycles, mopeds, bicycles, and car pools. 

Wolfline operates when classes are in session, Monday through Friday. All Wolfline buses travel along designated routes and 
stop at signed Wolfline bus stops. A valid student AllCampus Card is all that is required to ride the bus. Route and schedule 
brochures are available at D. H. Hill Library, the Student Center, NC State Bookstores, and at Transportation. The citywide 
bus service, Capital Area Transit (CAT) and the regional system (TTA), are available for students living throughout Raleigh. 

Bicycling offers an inexpensive alternative. Bicycle registration is encouraged to assist in recovery if the bicycle is lost or 
stolen. Bicycles may be registered with Transportation, Public Safety, or the residence halls at no charge. 

For more information, contact Transportation, NC State, Box 7221, Raleigh, NC 27695-7221, (919) 515-3424 or visit our 
Transportation website at http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/trans 

NC STATE STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The University makes every effort to provide surroundings which are pleasant and conducive to intellectual growth. In 
addition, a wide variety of athletic, cultural and social opportunities are available to students. Through the services and 
activities affiliated with campus life, as well as through extracurricular organizations and functions, students at NC State may 
acquire experience in group leadership and commimity living to supplement and enrich their education. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Every NC State student is a member of a community which exercises executive, legislative and judicial authority in matters 
of student life. Students have a voice in government through participation in campus-wide elections of officers, legislators, 
and judiciary members. 

CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 

Honorary. University-wide honorary societies include Golden Chain, senior leadership; Thirty and Three, junior leadership; 
Phi Eta Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta, freshman scholarship; Gamma Beta Phi, scholarship and service; and Phi Beta 
Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi, junior, senior and graduate student scholarship. 

Professional and Technical Organizations. The colleges and departments sponsor or supervise a large number of 
professional and technical societies and clubs. These organizations contribute substantially to the students' professional and 
social growth. 

Greek Life (Fraternities and Sororities). Fraternities and sororities are included in the many educational programs at NC 
State. Fraternal groups provide opportunities for students to develop skills of social interaction, community service, 
teamwork; sensitivity to the rights and needs of others, and leadership and management experience. Many fraternities and 
sororities offer housing opportunities as an additional benefit of membership. 

Twenty-five general college fraternities have chapters at NC State. They are Alpha Gamma Rho, Chi Psi, Delta Chi, Delta 
Sigma Phi, FarmHouse, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa Sigma, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Phil Delta 
Theta/FlJl, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma 
Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi, and Theta Tau. 

NC State has nine inter/national general college sororities. They are Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Phi, Chi 
Omega, Delta Sigma Theta, Delta Zeta, Sigma Kappa, Zeta Phi Beta, and Zeta Tau Alpha. 

If you are interested in membership, educational programing, and /or service opportunities, please consult the Greek Life 
Web pages (www/ncsu/greeklife), or visit the office (201 1 Harris Hall), or call (919)515-2441. 



47 



Pershing Rines. This is a professional and social fraternity open to students enrolled in any ROTC courses. Members of the 
Pershing Rifles participate in ceremonies such as the Color Guard for NC State athletic events and Pennant Guard for home 
football games. Pledge period is one semester, and focuses on the histor>- and traditions of the Pershing Rifles, as well as 
technical ability in the mastery of drill and ceremonies. 

The Ranger Challenge Team. Open to all members of the Wolfpack Battalion. Members participate in intercollegiate 
competitions of militaiy skills, including rifle marksmanship, hand grenades, ruck marching, patrolling, weapons assembly, 
the APFT, and rope bridge construction. NC State's Ranger Challenge Team is consistently one of the best on the east coast. 
Sponsored by Army ROTC, it competes against other schools in North and South Carolina, as well as schools on the east 
coast. 

Other Organizations. There are over 250 other student organizations. Students interested in exploring these organizations or 
in creating a new organization, may contact the Student Organizations Resources Center, Box 7306, Room 3101 Talley 
Student Center, (919)515-3323. 

STUDENT MEDIA 

NC State students have the opportunity to edit and manage a variety of student-oriented media. By working with these media, 
students may gain valuable extracurricular experience in journalism, broadcasting, production and design, leadership and 
management. There are five media staffed by students and supported in large part by a designated portion of each student's 
non-academic fees. 

The Agromeck, the University yearbook, is published in the fall of each year and provides a record in words and pictures of 
student and campus activities during the past year. 

The Nubian Message, published once a week, provides news and features about the African American community. 

The Technician, the University's oldest student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday. 

The Windhover, the campus literary and visual arts magazine, is published each spring. 

WKNC (88.1 FM), the student radio station, operates at 3000 watts, enabling it to be heard within a 42-mile radius of 
Raleigh. The station operates 24 hours a day with a full staff of engineers, disc jockeys, and news personnel. 

Several of the colleges have their own publications dealing with material of special interest to students in these areas. The 
publications include Agriculture and Life Sciences' Agri-Life, Forest Resources' 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Since the early days of NC State, musical organizations have played an important part in campus life, presenting concerts, 
furnishing music for official University functions and performing at athletic events. Indeed, participation in musical 
organizations has provided many opportunities for students to develop artistically as well as intellectually, and to balance the 
rigors of other academic study with educational experiences that provide pleasure and satisfaction. 

The majority of organizations receive one academic credit which may be used to satisfy University free elective requirements 
in any academic major. Membership in all musical organizations requires an audition with the insturctor. 

UNIVERSITY STUDENT UNION 

The University Student Union's Visual and Performing Arts and Activities Programs is the umbrella, organizational 
structure for most of the major arts and activities programs presented at North Carolina State University. The Union seeks to 
create "A Perfect Union of Arts and Activities" for all members of the University family - students, faculty, staff, 
administration, alumni, and guests. The University Student Union consists of eight arts and activities programs presenting 
more than 900 events per year; Cinematic Arts Program provides an international film series, a series of independent and 
experimental film makers, and a popular commercial film series). Center Stage at Stewart Theater (presents a wide variety 
of touring professional performing arts events), The Crafts Center (offers hands-on course work in a variety of crafts 
including pottery, fiber arts, photography, fiat glass and woodworking). Dance Program (provides credit and non-credit 
opportunities in dance, with two student dance companies and classes in technique, choreography and performance). Music 
Department (offers 1 1 choral and instrumental performance ensembles, available to students for credit and non-credit 
participation, course work in music theory, history, composition and performances, and an 18-hour music minor). Student 
Center Activities Office (consisting of the Union Activities Board's eight student committees, the Student Leadership 
Center, and the Cinematic Arts Program), Thomp.son Theater (is a student-producing theater, staging up to 13 productions 
annually, offering credit and non-credit participation in acting, direction, stage management and theater design, and an 18- 
hour theater minor). Visual Arts Center (hosts exhibitions annually, and manages the University's permanent collections of 

48 



textiles, ceramics, paintings, sculpture, furniture, photograpiiy and architectural, visual, graphic and products designs), and 
four support offices (Administrative Office, Business and Computer Planning, Reservations Office and Facilities 
Maintenance). The University Student Union's programming is carried out in four facilities: University Student Center, 
Witherspoon Student Center, Price Music Center, and Thompson Building. 

CENTER STAGE AT STEWART THEATER 

Center Stage presents more than 20 professional performing arts events annually in Stewart Theater. Performances include 
jazz, dance, drama, comedy, experimental theater, world music and traditional music. Stewart Theater is also the home to 
many other campus-sponsored events. Special rates are available to NC State students, faculty, and staff 

Cinematic Arts Program 

The Cinematic Arts Program is a 500-seat Campus Cinema located on the first floor of Witherspoon Student Center. The 
Passport International Film Series and the Southern Circuit Film and Lecture Series, which features showings of work and 
discussion by contemporary cinema photographers, are presented annually in the Campus Cinema. The UAB Films and UAB 
Lectures Committees select films and speakers for these and other series. For more information, call 5 1 5-5 1 6 1 . 

The Crafts Center 

Located on the ground floor of the Thompson Building is one of the fmest crafts facilities on any university campus. In 1996, 
The Crafts Center was awarded the Raleigh Medal of Arts for extraordinary achievement in the arts. Instruction is offered in 
pottery, woodworking, photography, weaving, flat glass, lapidary, telescope making, art, and much more. Studios are also 
available for independent work. The Crafts Center is open year-round and showcases between three and five exhibitions in a 
gallery dedicated to fine craft. A class in General Ceramics (TED 351) is offered for credit through the Department of 
Technology Education. 

Dance Program 

The Dance Program sponsors two student dance companies, NC State Dance Company and DanceVisions. Both companies 
are open by audition and offer performances on and off campus each semester. In cooperation with the Department of 
Physical Education, the Dance Program offers classes in dance technique, choreography and performance, plus master 
classes, lecture-demonstrations and performances by guest artists. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Music performance organizations have been an important part of campus life for much of University's history. Students in 
these groups perform in concerts and recitals on and off campus, participate in athletic events, and fumish music for official 
University functions. Each of the following ensembles is offered for academic credit. An audition with the instructor is 
required. For more information, please contact the Music Department office: telephone: (919) 515-2981; fax (919) 515-4204; 
e-mail: robert_petters@ncsu.edu. (Director of Music). 

Chamber Music. Students may elect to perform in a small ensemble of traditional or non-traditional instrumentation. 
Students with similar abilities will be placed in an ensemble by a faculty member or coach if an appropriate instrument 
grouping and rehearsal schedule can be established. 

Choral Ensembles. Students may select from five diverse ensembles currently offered for credit: Women's Choir, Varsity 
Men's Glee Club, Chamber Singers, New Horizons Gospel Choir, and the Raleigh Oratorio Society Symphonic Choir. The 
Choral Department offers students from all academic areas an opportunity to participate in the exploration and performance 
of the highest quality of choral repertoire spanning five centuries. Performance highlights have included concert tours of the 
Eastern United States and France, performances with the North Carolina Symphony, appearances at the North Carolina 
Music Educators Conference, as well as fall and spring concerts in Stewart Theater on the NC State campus. 

NC State Pipes and Drums. Students may play the bagpipes, an instrument known to many of North Carolina's earliest 
settlers, in order to represent the university through this unique and distinctive medium. Pipes, drums, and other equipment 
are furnished. Beginning pipe and drum lessons are available to students without previous experience 

Orchestras. Members of the Raleigh Civic Symphony and other orchestra! ensembles include NC State students, faculty, and 
staff, students and faculty from area colleges and universities, and community members. Placement is made according to 
individual ability, interest, and experience. A wide range of orchestra music is read and performed, with concerts given on 
and off campus. 

Winds and Percussion Ensembles. The Marching Band, Wind Ensemble, Symphonic Band, Concert Band, British Brass 
Band, Jazz Ensemble, Percussion Ensembles, Clarinet Choir, and Pep Bands comprise the Winds and Percussion program. 
The Marching Band is active during football season; the Pep Bands during basketball season. Other bands and ensembles 

49 



usually meet both semesters. Placement in a band or ensemble is made according to student ability and interest. All Pep 
Bands members also must be enrolled in one of the above bands or ensembles during the semester they play with the Pep 
Band. 

STUDENT CENTER ACTIVITIES OFFICE 

The Student Center Activities Office sponsors the Union Activities Board, the Student Leadership Center, and the Cinematic 
Arts Program (see Cinematic Arts Program listing). 

The Union Activities Board (UAB) is a student-directed programming network of eight committees which plan and 
implement a variety of programs for the campus community, including the Black Students Board, College Bowl, 
Entertainment Committee, Films Committee, Leisure & Recreation Committee, International Activities Committee, 
Leadership Development Committee, and Lectures Committee. 

The Student Leadership Center, sponsored by the University Student Center Activities Office, offers a variety of programs 
such as the Leadership Development Series and the role Model Leader's Forum that are designed to give all NC State 
students the opportunity to explore the nature of leadership and to develop their leadership potential and skills in living. The 
Leadership Development Series consists of approximately 25 non-credit workshops that focus on different aspects of 
leadership. The workshops are offered Monday through Thursday evenings. Further information may be obtained from 31 14 
University Student Center, (919) 515-2452. 

The NC State Team Challenge (Ropes Course) is a series of initiatives offering lessons in communication, leadership, 
ethics, conflict resolution, diversity, teamwork, and trust. 

The Leadership Certificate Program. You design! Complete dive Core Competency Workshops plus five electives of your 
choice and receive a Leadership Certificate from your College or School (awarded to currently enrolled NC State students 
only). 

Descriptive Leadership Transcript. Dynamic resume supplement informs employers of your commitment to developing 
personal leadership skills. Describes workshops you've completed as well as other accomplishments at NC State. 

Role Model Leaders' Forum. Listen to national and international leaders speak their mind on the topic of leadership, 
follow-up with a question and answer session and a reception. Call 5 15-2452 for more information. 

Leadership Library contains over 250 leadership reference materials available for checkout (books, audio cassettes, 
videotapes, newsleners). A complete listing is available on-line. Open 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday. 
Available to NC State students, faculty and staff. FREE!! 

THOMPSON THEATER 

Thompson Theater is North Carolina State University's volunteer student theater, housed within the Division of Student 
Affairs. Under the direction of a full-time professional staff, Thompson Theater continues its tradition of quality productions 
in the performing arts. 

Four major shows are produced each season, a children's theater production that also tours North Carolina schools in the 
spring, two student-directed studio productions, the annual Madrigal Dinner and TheatreFest, a summer season that features 
local professional and student artists. 

Thompson Theater offers a blend of student volunteer productions and academic theater training. Productions are open to all 
NC State students, whether or not they are enrolled in theater courses, thus providing an extra-curricular production program. 
Classes are available in acting, directing, introduction to theater, and all areas of technical theater, including stage craft, 
costume, make-up, lighting, and scenic design. Communication majors can receive a Theater Minor. 

Theater student organizations, open to all NC State students, include University Players, Alpha Psi Omega and Black 
Repyertory Theater. 

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 

The arts are an essential component of a complete university education, and the Visual Arts Center provides North Carolina 
State University students direct and unique access to the visual arts. Since 1979 The Visual Arts Center has been responsible 
for the development and conservation of North Carolina State University's collection of photography, paintings, ceramics, 
textiles, furniture and architectural drawings by regional and national artists. 

The Visual Arts Center's two galleries are located on the second floor of the Student Center at 3302 Cates Avenue and offer a 
series of exhibitions, free and open to the public, featuring the best examples of regional, national and international art. The 
Visual Arts Center also offers internships, educational programs and tours for North Carolina State University students. 

SO 



The Administrative offices of the Visual Arts Center are located on the third floor of the Student Center and the phone 

number is 919/515-3503. 

FACILITIES 

University Student Center is the location for a variety of facilities, programs, and services designed to offer rest, relaxation 
and recreation, as well as cultural, social, leadership and artistic development. Facilities in the University Student Center 
building include several lounge areas; 18 meeting and activity rooms, available by reservation to all campus organizations, 
with access to catering and audio-visual services; two television lounges; Jeremiah's Game Room; a variety of dining 
opportunities, including The Underground Pasta and Grill Restaurant, Commons Cafe and Emporium Convenience Store; 
Center Stage at Stewart Theater and the Visual Arts Center. Program offices include the International Student office. 
Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry, Student Legal Services, and University Dining administrative and catering offices. Service 
areas include the Reservations and Facilities Management Offices, Information Center and Ticket Central. 

Witherspoon Student Center, located three blocks west of the main building, houses the African-American Cultural Center, 
Student Government Offices, Sorority/Fraternity Group Buying Network, the Media Authority and offices of five student-run 
media organizations - Technician and The Nubian Message (newspapers), Agromeck (yearbook). Windhover (literary 
magazine), and WKNC FM 88.1 (radio station). The Witherspoon Student Center Annex also includes several lounge areas, 
including two balconies; one meeting room available by reservation; the African-American Cultural Center's Multi-Purpose 
Room, Gallery and Library; and the Campus Cinema, used for films, lectures and special events. 

Price Music Center is the location for the Music Department and its programs. 

Thompson Building is the location for Thompson Theater and The Crafts Center. 

ATHLETICS 

The University's "Wolfpack" athletic teams are well known nationally. The men's basketball team won national 
championships in 1974 and in 1983 and holds 10 Atlantic Coast Conference titles. The football team has been the Atlantic 
Coast Conference champion five times, co-champion twice, and has played in 16 bowl games. The Wolfpack women's cross- 
country team won national championships in 1979 and 1980 along with 10 ACC crowns, while the men's and women's soccer 
teams have both advanced to the NCAA's "final four" in the last six years. The women's basketball team, under the direction 
of 1988 United States Olympic gold medal winning coach Kay Yow, has played in 11 of 15 ACC Tournament title games. 
The wrestling team has won nine ACC titles while the men's swim team has claimed 24 conference championships. 
Providing additional color and spirit for the games, the cheerleading squad was recognized three times as national champions. 
Numerous individual NC State athletes have won NCAA titles, national championships, and international honors, including 
medals in the last four Olympic Games in which the United States has competed. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

The Department of Athletics conducts the University's intercollegiate athletics program involving 1 1 varsity sports for men, 
nine for women, and one co-ed. 

The athletics program is administered by the Athletics Director with the Athletics Council, made up of 1 1 faculty, three 
alumni, two members of student government, two student athletes, and one coach, serving in an advisory capacity to the 
Athletics Director and Chancellor. The program is self-supporting and is operated through gate receipts, radio and television 
revenues, and student fees. Funds for athletics grantsinaid are provided through the North Carolina State Student Aid 
Association (WolfJDack Club). Grantsinaid are based upon the recommendation of the coach of each sport, approved by the 
Athletics Director, and awarded by the University's Financial Aid Office. 

Men's varsity sports include soccer, cross country, and football in the fall; basketball, swimming, indoor track, and wrestling 
in the winter; and track, golf, tennis, and baseball in the spring. Varsity sports for women are soccer, cross country, and 
volleyball in the fall; basketball, indoor track, swimming, and gymnastics in the winter; and track and tennis in the spring. 
During the winter the co-ed rifle team competes. 

The University facilities include Carter Finley Stadium (51,500 seats); Reynolds Coliseum (12,400 seats for basketball); 
Doak Field (3,800 seats for baseball); the Paul H. Derr Track Stadium (3,000 seats) with a nine-lane tartan track; a 2,200 seat 
swimming stadium with a 25-yard by 25-meter pool and a 50-meter training and competition pool; a soccer field (5,000 
seats); and a 12-court all-weather tennis complex. In addition, the Wolfpack athletics administrative offices, women's 
intercollegiate coaches' offices, several men's sports coaches' offices, and an athletics dining hall are housed in the Case 
Athletics Center. The Weisiger Brown General Athletics Facility houses the football, track, and wrestling coaches' offices, a 
weight room, a wrestling room, a training room, an equipment room, and dressing rooms for football, wrestling, and track. 
Reynolds Coliseum has a weight room, training room, and locker and dressing facilities for the women's sports and dressing 

SI 



rooms for the men's sports of basketball, baseball, soccer, and tennis. For ticket information, call (919)515-2106 or 1-800- 
310-PACK. 

INTRAMURAL RECREATIONAL SPORTS 

NC State maintains an extensive program of intramural-recreational sports administered by the Department of Physical 
Education. This program is composed of divisions in intramurals. club sports, informal recreation, fimess, and outdoor 
adventures. Additional opportunities are available in extramural sports and special events. The program offerings are 
available to all students, faculty, and stafT. 

Seventeen sports are scheduled through intramurals including basketball, flag football, softball, soccer, volleyball, 
badminton, bowling, cross-country, golf, handball, pitch & putt, racquetball, squash, swim meets, table tennis, tennis, and 
track meets. 

There are 30 active clubs with seven seeking affiliation to active status. The active club sports are aikido, angling, archery, 
baseball, bowling, cricket, cycling, equestrian, frisbee, ice hockey, judo, lacrosse (men), lacrosse (women), outing, 
racquetball. rodeo, rowing, rugby, sailing, snow skiing, soccer (men), soccer (women), tae kwon do, tennis, triathlon, 
volleyball, water polo, water skiing, windsurfing, and wrestling. Those seeking affiliation are fencing, field hockey, golf, 
mountain biking, roller hockey, social ballroom dance, and weight lifting. 

Some of the activities included in informal recreation are archery, backgammon, croquet, darts, free throw/hot shot contest, 
grass volleyball, home run derby, pickleball, putting contest, spades tournament, and wallyball. Fimess activities include a 
variety of aerobic sessions, aqua aerobics, fit pack, and (WSR) walking, swimming, and running. Additionally, there are 
fimess workshops in the areas of back care, cross-training, foot care, injury prevention, massage, nutrition, stress 
management, swimming stroke clinic, weight training, and yoga. Extramural sports provides for participation in "Big Four 
Sports Day," a competition between Duke, NC State, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Wake Forest. Students also participate in the 
National Flag Football Championship and Schick Super Hoops. 

The outdoor adventures division provides trips for backpacking, birding. camping and hiking, canoeing and kayaking, and 
wildlife art exposition. Instructional workshops are offered for backpacking and expedition planning, canoeing and fishing, 
photography, rockclimbing. and wilderness cooking. The outdoor adventures storehouse contains various equipment 
available for checkout to all students, faculty, and staff. 

The Intramural-Recreational Sports Program is comprehensive in scope and committed to meeting the sports and physical 
activity needs of the students, faculty, and staff at North Carolina State University. 

COLLEGES, DEPARTMENTS, AND PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Undergraduate programs of study are offered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the School of Design, the 
college of Education and Psychology, the College of Engineering, the College of Forest Resources, the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences, the College of Management, the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and the 
College of Textiles. 

GENERAL EDUCATION DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS 

The program in General Education establishes the foundation for a lifetime of intellectual discovery, personal development, 
and community service while preparing students for advanced work in various professional disciplines and fields of 
knowledge. 

Courses meeting the General Education requirements introduce students to the disciplines of intellectual inquiry and promote 
respect for moral values and aesthetic experience. Students further develop an understanding of the human mind and spirit, a 
sense of history and the duties of citizenship, the workings of society and the world around us. 

General Education in the basic fields of knowledge encourages mastery of fundamentals, versatility of mind, motivation for 
learning, intellectual discipline, and self-reliance. Development of these skills enables ethical and responsible participation in 
a democratic society and constitutes the best preparation for dealing creatively and constructively with the issues and 
opportunities of our time. 



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MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Rationale 

A logical approach to problem solving is important for successful functioning in society and should include the abilities to 
formulate models, be critical consumers of quantitative information, communicate mathematically and solve problems. 

The study of mathematical sciences will enable the student to: 

1 . Improve and refine problem-solving abilities including the ability to use the processes of mathematical modeling to 
bring abstract reasoning to bear on real-world problems. Students learn to formulate problems fi-om real-world 
situations, move from problems to mathematical models such as graphs or equations, and transform a model into a 

solution. 

2. Develop the ability to communicate mathematically. This includes the 
abilities to: 

a. Follow simple directions given in prose, flow chart form, or depicted pictorially; read and interpret tables, charts 
and graphs; and follow directions to conduct mathematical activity or investigation, make conclusions, and write a 
report that discusses the mathematics of the activity and represents the results in acceptable mathematical notation. 

b. Be able to reduce, tabulate, summarize, analyze, graphically represent, make predictions and draw inferences from 
presented data arising from real world situations. 

3. Demonstrate logical reasoning skills including the ability to distinguish among inductive, deductive, and probabilistic 
reasoning and to follow, evaluate and construct simple, logical arguments. 

4. Build on previously-learned algebraic and geometric concepts and 
models. 

5. Further develop an understanding of the concept and role of functions. This includes the abilities to match functional 
relationships in real world contexts to mathematical representations; interpret mathematical representations of 
functional relationships arising in some context back to the original real world situations; and be able to translate 

among graphical, tabular, and symbolic representations of fimctions. 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

Rationale 

The natural sciences pursue basic questions about the workings of the universe, and the richness, variety and 
interconnectedness of the world around us. Students today are exposed to an increasing volume of information, from a large 
variety of sources, in diverse and changing formats. Training in the natural sciences is essential to help students develop 
skills to distinguish between testable and untestable ideas, recognize scientifically valid tests of theories, and understand how 
information relates to those tests. By studying the natural sciences, students learn to reason both inductively and deductively, 
develop and test scientific hypotheses, and understand the value and limitations of scientific studies. The development and 
application of new technologies require scientifically-literate citizens who can understand technological issues and evaluate 
the role of science in society's debate of those issues. 

Education in the natural sciences will enable the student to: 

1 . use the methods and processes of science in testing hypotheses, solving problems and making decisions, 

2. articulate and make inferences from the major concepts, principles, laws, theories, and responsible applications of 
science in specific disciplines; 

3. recognize the role of science in the interactions of science, technology and society; and 

4. cultivate a life-long interest in science. 

Minimum Requirements for all curricula (20 hours) 

A total of six courses (20 hours) in the mathematical and natural sciences. 

1) Two courses (6 hours) selected from mathematics, statistics, and logic; one must be a mathematics course. 

2) Three courses (1 1 hours) from the natural sciences; two from different basic sciences (biology, chemistry, earth sciences 
and physics); two of the three courses must have a laboratory. 

3) The sixth course (3 hours) selected from any of the mathematical science; natural science; or science, technology and 
society courses. 

WRITING AND SPEAKING 

Rationale 

Writing and speaking are powerful ways of understanding ourselves and the world we live in. It is though writing and 
speaking that the various disciplines and professions define the knowledge and methodologies that characterize them. 
Because these communication arts are central to learning and to engaging in the productive life of a community, students 
must: 

S3 



1 . leam to use writing and speaking as ways of generation, critiquing, and refining ideas, both their own and those of 
others; 

2. understand and use the conventions and standards governing written and spoken disclosure across academic 
disciplines; 

3. develop the critical reading, writing, and speaking abilities necessary for participating effectively in a discipline; 

4. develop a repertoire of strategies for addressing the concerns of audiences in the many contexts of contemporary 
life-academic, professional, and civic. 

Minimum requirement for all curricula (9 hours) 

1 ) Two semesters of composition and rhetoric during the freshman year. 

2) One semester from any of the following: 

a) advanced writing, 

b) speech, 

c) foreign language (FL_201 or higher in the student's first foreign language or any FL course in a second language). 

Meeting these goals requires students to engage in writing and speaking across the curriculum. To this end, communications 
requirements should be integral to all courses used be students to fulfill the humanities and social sciences requirements. 

Further, in order that skills develop broadly and consistantly along with the individual's increasing knowledge of subject 
maner, all upper-division courses offered in the university should incorporate a significant communication requirement, and 
at least one major written paper should be required in every curriculum in both the junior and senior years. 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Rationale 

The humanities and the social sciences comprise the subjects and disciplines that use various modes of rational inquiry to 
understand human nature and experience, organization and change in human societies, the nature of the world, and rational 
inquiry itself An education in the humanities and social sciences requires reading significant works, gaining an exposure to a 
variety of methodologies, and learning to apply these in written exposition. An education in the basic humanistic disciplines is 
a necessary part of being truly educated - of becoming a citizen with a broad knowledge of human cultures and with well- 
considered moral, philosophical, aesthetic, and intellectual convictions. 

The goal of general education in the humanities and social sciences is to give the students the foundations for an 
understanding of 

1 . the cultural and linguistic traditions of their own and other societies, 

2. the past and the action of historical processes, 

3. the application scientific methods to the study of human behavior and mental processes, both individual and 
collective, 

4. ethical choices and the issues of human values they entail, and how to make those choices with intellectual rigor 
and clarity, 

5. the aesthetic, personal, and cultural significance of works of art and, 

6. various disciplines as modes of inquiry with distinctive purposes and intellectual processes; and the ability to: 

a. distinguish degrees of plausibility and verification, by critically examining both evidence and logic and, 

b. read analytically (i.e, to reconstruct arguments and consider implications) and interpretatively (i.e, to grasp 

meaning by being sensitive to the ways in which meaning is generated), as well as to acquire information. 

The general education requirements in the Humanities and Social Sciences are designed to expose students to content areas 
that demonstrate the relevant modes of inquiry: 

1. Two courses or the equivalent in the study of history and/or literature (6 hours). The study of history provides 
an understanding of continuities and changes in human thought and behavior and of the ongoing process in 
which individuals shape and are shaped by their societies and their governments. Studying history also 
provides training in the analysis of process and the evaluation of a wide variety of evidence. The study of 
literature introduces students to the many ways of deriving meaning from the human condition and to the many 
forms in which meaning is expressed. Studying literature also develops students' capacity for critical analysis 
and personal expression, their aesthetic sensitivity, and their reading and writing skills. 

2. One course or the equivalent in the study of philosophy, religion, or the visual and performing arts (3 hours). 
In the study of philosophy, students are exposed to the rigorous procedures of philosophical thought, to ethical 
issues, and to the insights of ethical reasoning. In the study of religions, they are introduced to beliefs of their 
own and other cultures, and they leam how various religions have resolved ethical issues and have addressed 
the human condition. The visual and performing arts develop students' aesthetic sensitivities, critical judgment, 
and personal creativity. They also provide students with an understanding of the cultural and historical 
dimensions of artistic expression. 

S4 



3. Two courses or the equivalent from different content areas, in the study of psychology, economics, politics and 
government, sociology, anthropology and cultural geography. (6 hours). The study of these subjects enables 
students to understand individual and collective human behavior by exploring meaning within a variety of 
social, cultural and political contexts; by analyzing the structures within which human goals are established 
and human choices are made; and by applying theoretical and quantitative models to specific cases. 

4. Two additional courses selected within Humanities and Social Sciences (6 hours). These hours could be used 
to pursue specific interests, to provide additional breadth or develop depth by taking courses focused on a 
common theme. 

5. Among the courses selected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirement at least one must focus 
on a non-English speaking culture. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Rationale 

In a sense, languages are keys to the world. The continuous expansion of international relations makes the knowledge of 
foreign languages increasingly significant. In learning a foreign language and studying its literature and cultures, students 
acquire a body of knowledge about how humans think, view the world, express themselves, and communicate with one 
another. 

Language learning also expands one's ability to create and discover new meaning in one's own language and culture. 
Knowledge of the linguistic structures of a second language helps students to understand their own language better. Likewise, 
an awareness of contrasting cultural concepts sensitizes students to the differences between their own culture and others. 
Such an awareness has become increasingly important as the communities of the world have become more interconnected 
and interdependent. The needs of our global society require that more citizens have access to other languages and cultures in 
order to cooperate in the process of improving the quality of human life. 

Minimum requirements for all curricula (0 hours) 

(1) Two years of high school foreign language be required as a prerequisite for admission to the University. 

(2) Foreign language proficiency at the FL_ 102 level be required for graduation. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Rationale 

Essential to a university student's development are attitudes and skills for healthy life-styles. In addition to maintaining 
fimess, participation in team and individual physical activity significantly reduces major health risks. 

Goals for students in physical education include: 

1 . learning the fundamentals of cardiovascular and strength development and applying this knowledge in the initiation 
and/or continuation of personal fitness programs, 

2. acquiring the basic skills of several lifetime sports or activities and enhancing their proficiencies in these skills so that 
they will continue to participate throughout life, 

3. gaining a working knowledge of the rules, strategies, and safety aspects of several sports or activities, 

4. reducing stress from the academic rigors of their other courses, and improving their general physical, social, and 
mental well-being while learning, participating, and having fun. 

Minimum requirements for all curricula (2 hours) 

Two credit hours, one credit each, in physical education 

(1) Two courses including one Fimess and Wellness course. 

(2) All courses will be available on an S/U basis. 

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY 

Rationale 

North Carolina State University, as a land grant university, has a mission that stresses the application of science and 
technology for the betterment of humankind. It is essential, therefore, that students be exposed to the vital interactions 
among science, technology, society, and the quality of life. 

Goals for students in completing the Science, Technology and Society requirement include: 

1. developing an understanding of the influence of science and technology on civilizations, 

2. developing the ability to respond critically to scientific and technological issues in civic affairs, and 

3. understanding the interactions among science, technology and values. 

55 



Minimum requirement for all curricula (3 hours) 

Courses which satisfy this requirement can be oriented toward science and technology or toward the humanities and social 
sciences. Students in science and technology should study this topic from a humanities and social sciences perspective. 
Students with majors in the humanities and social sciences should study this topic from a science and technology perspective. 
This course can also partially satisfy either the humanities and social sciences requirement or the mathematical and natural 
sciences requirement (# 3) but not both. This requirement can be satisfied by an interdisciplinary course designed to cover 
both perspectives. 

COMPUTER LITERACY 

Today's graduate must have a knowledge of information technology and computer applications. Every student needs a basic 
understanding of information processing. It is not necessary that every student be a programmer. 

Students should develop and demonstrate proficiency in the use of computers, learning to use applications such as word 
processing, spreadsheets, database management programs, electronic mail, and packages and applications specific to their 
field of study. 

Minimum requirements for all curricula (0 hours) 

The following may be used to fulfill computer technology instruction: 

(1) instruction and assignments required within courses, and/or 

(2) required use of a computer to complete assignments. 

LIBRARY/INFORMATION LITERACY 

The demands of an increasingly technological and information-dependent society require that students have a basic 
understanding of how information is identified and defined by experts, structured, physically organized, and accessed. 

Proficiency is best gained by requiring the use of information resources to complete an assignment, or to create a 
bibliography from which a paper or speech is developed. Information retrieval instruction beyond that provided in freshman 
English could be connected with writing and speaking requirements and/or it could be taught by requiring assignments 
involving substantial use of library resources. Academic units are encouraged to work closely with library staff for the 
development and delivery of instruction and experience in information retrieval techniques. 

The following may be used to fulfill information retrieval instruction: 

(1) use of one or more class periods to teach the structure of information, and to provide experience using major 
information resources, 

(2) use of self-paced printed instructional materials, 

(3) use of computer-based instructional materials, 

(4) development of an information-based assignment requiring use of library resources, and/or other methods as 
appropriate for the discipline. 



56 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES 



1 1 5 Patterson Hall 


Phone: 


(919)515-2614 


NCSU Box 7642 


Fax: 


(919)515-5266 


Raleigh. NC 27695-7642 


E-mail: 


cals_programs@ncsu. edu 




Web address: 


www. cals. ncsu. edu/ 



J. L. Oblinger, Dean 

G. T. Barthalmus, Associate Dean and Director. Academic Programs 

J.C. Comwell, Assistant Director of Academic Programs and Director of the Agricultural Institute 

B.M. Kirby, Assistant Director, Academic Programs 

B.P Alston-Mills, Coordinator. CALS Diversity Programs 

M. L. Bullock, Coordinator.Career Services 

Academic programs in the college represent a unique blending of the agricultural and life sciences. Agriculture Is a very diverse industry that touches 
everyone's life In some way or another. The life sciences provide foundations for studying medical and health-related disciplines as well as environmental 
sciences and molecular biology. 

The goals of the instructional program in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Include providing relevant, scientific, and practical knowledge of the 
food, agricultural, and life sciences to its students. These programs emanate from a highly qualified and accomplished faculty committed to academic 
excellence and the development of the individuals to their personal and professional potential. Central to the college's goals Is the cultivation of 
interdisciplinary problem-solving skills which will serve Its graduates well as they pursue a lifetime of learning and adaptation to change. 
The overall objectives of the academic program include the following: 

• To provide an opportunity for a broad university education 

• To provide a variety of learning experiences 

• To offer a choice of specialization in agriculture and life sciences 

• To provide background for graduate or professional programs 

DEGREES 

The bachelor of science degree is conferred upon the satisfactory completion of one of the curricula In this college. 

The degrees of master of science, master of agriculture and master of life sciences are offered in the various departments in the college. 

The doctor of philosophy degree is offered in the following subject areas: animal science, biochemistry, biological and agricultural engineering, botany, crop 

science, economics, entomology, food science, genetics, horticultural science, immunology, microbiology, natural resources, nutrition, physiology, plant 

pathology, sociology, soil science, toxicology, and zoology. 

Further information on graduate offerings may be found in the Graduate Catalog. 

CURRICULUM OFFERINGS AND REQUIREMENTS 

A freshman enrolling in agriculture and life sciences has common core courses the first year - courses appropriate in all curricula. This approach allows the 
student time to explore various programs before selecting a curriculum. The student selects a major in a department or interdisciplinary program. 
All departments offer science curricula (intended primarily for students who anticipate attending graduate or professional school), several technology 
curricula, and the agricultural business management curriculum Is offered In the department of agricultural and resource economics. 

DEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 

Business-agricultural business management Is offered through the Department of Agricultural and Resource economics. A concentration In biological 

sciences and the opportunity for double majoring in business and other programs are available. 

Science-animal science, agricultural and extension education, applied sociology, biochemistry, biological engineering (joint program with the College of 

Engineering, biological sciences, botany, fisheries and wildlife sciences Oolnt program with the College of Forest Resources, food science, horticultural 

science, microbiology, poultry science, and zoology. Pre-professional courses are offered in the science curriculum track. 

Technology-agricultural and environmental technology, animal science, food science, horticultural science and poultry science. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

The curricula in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have a common freshman year with the exception of the science program offered through the 
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. For the freshman year of that curriculum, see the College of Engineering. 

ACADEMIC MINORS 

Several departments in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences offer a minor in their discipline. Students interested in additional information regarding 
a minor should contact the appropriate departmental office. At present, the following minors are available: 

Minor Department 

Agricultural Business Management Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Systems Technology 

.Animal Science Animal Science 

Applied Sociology Sociology and Anthropology 

Biological Sciences Biological Sciences 

Botany Botany 

Entomology Entomology 

Crop Science Crop Science 

Food Science Food Science 

57 



Genelics Genetics 

Horticullural Science Horticultural Science 

Microbiology Microbiology 

Nutrition Food Science 

Poultn Science Poultry Science 

Soil Science Soil Science 

Zoology Zoology 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL AND INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS 

These curricula offer the opportunity to select broad curriculum majors that involve two or more depanments or colleges. 

Agronomy -a technical curriculum dealing with the fundamentals of crop production and soil management. The curriculum is administered by the 

departments of crop science and soil science 

Biological sciencn -a curriculum uith emphasis on biological and physical sciences, especially designed for graduate or professional courses requiring a 

biology background 

Environmental sciences -a curriculum concerned with the development of new and more efTiciem ways to maintain and enhance the world's environments 

for society's benefit including ecological, technical and economic approaches. The curriculum is administered jointly by the college of Agriculture and Life 

Sciences and the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Natural Resources -A curriculum concentrating on the use, management and improvement of natural resources. The curriculum is administered jointly by 

the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the College of Forest Resources and the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 

In addition to these cited curricula, a number of arrangements are available that provide the student an opportunity to select areas of course concentration. 

STl'DENT ACTIVITIES 

Students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have numerous opportunities to take part in broadening extracurricular activities. Most departments 
have student organizations that provide professional as well as social experience. Representatives of these clubs form the Agri-Life Council. This council is 
the student organization representing the College Student lours provide an opportunity to see firsthand the application of classroom principles. 
In addition, students representing agrimarketing. agronomy, animal science, horticultural science, food science, poultry science and soil science compete 
regionally and nationally in a number of activities, providing student members a chance to learn by travel as well as by participation. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences has a comprehensive honors program for qualified students throughout their academic careers. Both seminar 
discussion programs covering broad topics and an independent research program arc included Faculty provide direction on an individual basis to each 
student with the students selecting their projects 

Participation in the CALS Honors Program is limited to CALS students with a GPA of 3.35 or above. The following ALS courses. 398H. 498H. 499H, are 
required In addition, a student must take at least six hours of honors course work (at least 3 credits outside CALS) or participate in the University Scholars 
Program for at least two semesters Honors course work must be completed with a "C or better. 

JOINT COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM 

The Department of Biochemistry's Honors Program, which is administered through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Physical 
and Mathematical Sciences, is designed to encourage excellent undergraduate biochemistry majors to develop their academic potential through a selection of 
courses and research that will challenge their abilities and belter prepare them for postgraduate careers. 

To be admitted to this program, a student must have at least a 3.500 overall GPA. including grades B or better in calculus (MA 141. 241. 242). general 
chemistry (CH 101. 102, 201, 202). organic chemistry (CH 221, 223), and calculus-based physics (PY 205, 208). To complete the program, the student must 
take two semesters of physical chemistry (CH 431, 433). and earn at least three credit hours in biochemically-related research. A written scientific report 
based on the student's research is required. A minimum of 9 credit hours must be drawn from at least two of the following three categories: 

• designated Honors courses, such as BCH 454H 

• advanced courses, such as 500-lcvel courses in related fields 
research, such as BCH 492. BCH 493. or ALS 498H and 499H 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Students in all majors with strong academic records are recognized by national organizations that have local chapters. Gamma Sigma Delta, Alpha Zeta, 
Alpha Fpsilon Delta and Phi Kappa Phi 

SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences awards approximately 350 scholarships each year on a combination of selection factors including merit, 
financial need and leadership. 

JEFFERSON SCHOLARS IN AGRICHfH IRE/LIFE SCIENCES AND THE HUMANITIES (See College of Humanities and Social Sciences) 

The Thomas Jefferson Scholars Program in Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Humanities is a joint program of the College of Agriculture and Life 

Sciences and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences It is a double degree which permits participants to have two concentrations: one in an area of 

agriculture/life sciences and one in an area of humanities/social sciences. The double degree program may be individually designed to meet each student's 

particular interests and career goals The purpose of the program is to produce potential leaders in agriculture and the life sciences who have not only 

technical expertise but also an appreciation for the social, political, and cultural issues that affect decision-making. 

Each spring a number of entering freshmen arc chosen to receive scholarships to participate in the Jefferson Program In addition, other qualified students 

may choose to pursue a double major in agriculturc/lifc sciences and the humanities under the Jefferson program 

Students interested in applying to the Jefferson Scholars program should contact cither of the following people before January 15. 

Dr. George T. Barthalmus, Associate Dean Dr. Edward T. Funkhouser. Assistant Dean 

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

NCSU Box 7642 NCSU Box 8101 

Raleigh, NC 27695 Raleigh, NC 27695 

(919)515-2614 (919)515-2467 

58 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

An international seminar is offered to interested students. In addition, an international option, requiring a modem foreign language and 12 semester hours of 
appropriate courses in the social sciences, is available for students enrolled in any curricula. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION www.cals.ncsu.edu/agexed/ 

Ricks Hall, Room 13A 
Phone: (919)515-2241 

R. W. Shearon, Head and Assistant Director. Cooperative Extension Service 
J. L. Flowers, Coordinator of Advising 
R. T. Liles, Associate Head 

Professors: G. W. Bostick, D. M. Jenkins, G. E. Moore, R. D. Mustian; Associate Professors: J.L. Flowers, R.T. Liles; Extension Specialists-Educational 
Programs: J. G. Richardson, B. G. Watts; Extension Associates: J.D. Gibson, E.B. Wilson; Associate Faculty: K.J. Gamble, R.C. King, T.T. McKinney, 
J.E. Mock; Adjunct Faculty: E.J. Boone, J. Lee, J. Sabella. 

Agricultural and Extension Education is a broad field of study and practice representing the blending of agricultural and behavioral sciences into educational 
programs for youth and adults. Agriculture impacts everyone's life in terms of food, water, air, clothing, homes and the quality of life. Central to the 
department's goals is the formal and informal teaching of problem-solving and learning skills for a lifetime of growing, evolving, and changing. 

Numerous professional improvement opportunities are available to people participating in departmental programs. Graduates have the choice to plan for 
teaching, administrative leadership and public relations positions in secondary schools, community colleges. Cooperative Extension, universities and 
agribusinesses. Graduates are highly qualified in agricultural and extension education and career placement assistance is provided all graduates. 

CURRICULA 

Agricultural education encompasses areas of study which will enable one to participate effectively in planning, promoting, and initiating educational 
programs in agriculture. The program leads t a Bachelor of Science degree and is designed to prepare teachers of agriculture for secondary schools and, 
community and technical colleges. The demand for agricultural education teachers exceeds present supply, in the Carolinas, Virginia, and throughout the 
nation. 

The Agricultural Education/Agricultural Extension curriculum is designed to prepare individuals for careers in the extension service. It Is offered as a 
program track under the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultival and Extension Education. Students are required to complete both classroom and 
laboratory studies on the North Carolina State campus and a closely supervised practicum in the field. A 45-hour field work experience in an extension 
office or agriculture-related industry during the senior year is required. 

The Agricultural Education/Communication Concentration is designed to prepare individuals for careers in professions related to communications in 
agriculture. It is offered as a concentration under the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural and Extension Education. Students are required to complete 
both classroom and laboratory studies on the North Carolina State campus and a closely supervised practicum in the field. A 45-hour field work experience 
in an agricultural industry during the sophomore year and a full-semester practicum experience in an agricultural-related industry during the senior year are 
required. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

TEACHER CONCENTRATION 

Degree earned: B.S. in Agricultural and Extension Education 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 1 AEE (ED) 226 Instr. Technology for Agric. Ed 3 

BIO 125 General Biology 4 ANS 150 Introduction to Animal Science 4 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 3 ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading 3 

EOE 101 Intro, to Occupational Education 1 Math Elective' 3 

Comm/Speech Elective' 3 History Elective' 3 

Math Elective' 3 Physical Education Elective 1 

Any 100-level PE in Flmess & Wellness I 17 

16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

AEE (ED) 206 Intro, to Teach. Agriculture 3 Agricultural Concentration'' 4 

ARE 201 Intro, to Agriculture & Resouce Econ. or Agricultural Concentration' 4 

BAE 201 Shop Processes &Mgmt 3 Science, Tech., Society Req. ' 3 

EC 201 Prin. of Microeconomics 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Agriculniral Concentration' 3 Literature Elective' 3 

Chemistry Elective' 4 17 



59 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

AEE (ED) 322 Exper Leam in Agriculture 

AEE (ED) 327 Conducting Summer Programs 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

AgriculturaJ Concentration' 

Forestry Elective or 

Plant Science Elective' 



2 
I 
3 
4 
3 

2-3 
15-16 



Spring Semester 

AEE(ED)303 Adm/Sup of Student Org. 

ELP 344 School and Society 

PSY 376 Developmental Psych, or 

PSY 476 Psych of Adolescent Dev 

SOC 305 Racial & Ethnic Relations 

AgriculturaJ Concentration' 

Philosophy, Religion, Visual/Perform Arts Elective'" 



Credits 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

AEE (ED) 426 Methods of Teaching Agriculture 

ECI 451 Teaching Sec School Reading 

Agricultural Concentration' 

Free Electives" 



Credits 



3 

2 

5-6 
6-8 
16-19 



Spring Semester 

AEE (ED) 424 Planning Education Prog. 

AEE (ED) Student Teaching in Agriculture 

AEE (ED) 490 Senior Sem. in Agriculture Education 



Credits 



MiDimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128* 

•Note Students must have demonstrated foreign language proficiency at the FL_I02 level. 

'Select from approved Communication/Speech electives. 

'Mathematical sciences elective list. One course must be a math course. 

'Select from the History elective list. 

"These courses must be selected fit)m one of the approved concentrations. 

'Select a chemistry course from the approved Natural Sciences courses 

*Select the approved science, technology, and society course for the concentration. 

'Select from the approved list of Humanities and Social Sciences courses. One course in the curriculum must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

"Select from approved Literature electives 

'Either a forestry or a plant science elective may be required, depending upon the concentration selected. Contact the department for course required for 

specific concentrations 

'Select from the approved list of Philosophy, Religion, and visual & performing arts courses. 

"Free elective requirements vary depending upon elective choices in the curriculum. Students must complete free electives in order for the total hours in the 

curriculum to equal 128. 

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION CONCENTRATIONS 



Agricultural Business Concentration 

ARE 201 Introduction to Agriculture & Resource Econ or 

EC 201 Principles of Microeconomics 

ARE 210 Consumer Economics or 

BUS 225 Personal Finance 

ARE 303 Farm Business Management or 

ARE 304 Agri Business Management 

ARE 306 Agricultural Law or 

ARE 309 Environmental Law or 

BUS 307 Business Law 

ARE 31 1 Agricultural Markets or 

ARE 312 Agribusiness Marketing 

ARE 321 Agricultural Financial Management 

ARE Elective (must be ARE course) 

Economics Elective (ARE, EC, BUS, ACC) 

Agricultural Englncerinf; Technology 
Concentration 

BAE 201 Shop Processes and Management 

BAE 31 1 Agricultural Machinery and Power 

BAE 323 Water Management 

BAE 324 Elementary Surveying 

BAE 332 Animal Facilities and Envir Mgml. 

BAE 343 Agricultural Electrification 

BAE 344 Circuits and Controls 

BAE 432 Agricultural & Envir. Safety & Health 

BAE Elective 

Agronomy Concentration 

BIO 125, General Biology 

CS 213 Crops Adaptation and Production 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

SSC 342 Soil Fertility Lab 

CS4I 1 Crop Ecology 

CS 414 Weed Science 

PP 315 Introduction to Plant Pathology 



Animal Science Concentration 

ANS 150 Introduction to Animal Science 

ANS 205 Anatomy & Phys. of Domestic Animals or 

ZO 150 Animal Diversity 

ANS 2 1 5 Basic Agricultural Genetics or 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 

ANS 230 Nutrition of Domestic Animals or 

ANS 250 Applied Animal Nutrition 

Animal Science Elective 

Select 6 hours from the following: 
ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 
ANS 403 Swine Management 
ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management 
ANS 406 Sheep Management 
ANS 410 Equine Management 

Botany Concentration 

BIO 125 General Biology 

BO 200 Plant Life 

BO 360 Introduction to Ecology 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 

Horticultural Science Concentration 

BO 200 Plant Life 

HS201 Principles of Horticulture 

HS30I Plant Propagation 

HS 41 1 Nursery Management or 

HS 440 Greenhouse Management 

HS 42 1 Tree Fruit Production or 

HS 422 Small Fruit Production or 

HS 431 Vegetable Production 

HS 442 Floriculture II 

Horticultural Science Elective 



60 



Natural Resources Concentration 

BO 200 Plant Life 

SSC 185 Land and Life 

SSC Soil Science 

FOR 1 10 Introduction to Forestry or 

FOR 252 Intro, to Forest Science 

FW (ZO) 22 1 Conservation for Natural Res. 

FW (ZO) 353 Wildlife Management 

ARE 336 Intro to Resource and Envir. Economics 

BO 360 Introduction to Ecology 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 

Poultry Science Concentration 

BIO 125 General Biology 

PO 201 Poultry Science and Production 

PO 201 Poultry Science Seminar 

PO 301 Evaluation of Live Poultry or 



27 hrs. 


PO 351 Evaluation of Poultry Products 


2 


4 


PO 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 


3 


3 


PO 410 Prod and Mgmt of Game Birds 


3 


4 


PO 420 Turkey Production 


2 




PO 422 Incubation and Hatchery Mgmt 


2 


2-3 


PO 423 Broiler Production 


2 


3 
3 
3 


PO 430 Poultry Breeding 


3 


Zoology Concentration 


26 hrs. 


3 


BIO 125 General Biology 


4 


1 


BO 200 Plant Life 


4 




ZO 1 50 Animal Diversity 


4 


26 hrs. 


ZO 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 


3 


4 


ZO 250 Animal Anatomy 


4 


4 


ZO 353 Wildlife Management 


3 


1 


Zoology Elective 


3-4 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Agricultural and Extension Education 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 

Comm./Speech Elective' 

Math Elective' 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness^ 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 ANS 150 Intro, to Animal Science 

4 ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 

3 Agriculture Elective' 

3 History Elective^ 

3 Math Elective' 

I Physical Education Elective 
14 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

AEE 492 External Learning Exp. 

BAE 201 Shop Processes & Mgmt 

Chemistry Elective'' or 

PY211 College Physics I 

Humanities or Social Science Elective' 

Literature Elective' 



Credits 

3 
3 



Spring Semester 

AEE (ED) 226 Inst. Technology in Agriculture Education 

ARE 201 Intro, to ARE or 

EC 201 Economics I 

FOR 1 10 Intro, to Forestry or 

FOR 252 Intro, to Forest Science 

Philosophy, Religion Visual/Perform. Arts Elective'" 

Natural Science Elective' 



Credits 



2-3 
3 

3-4 
14-16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

AEE 323 Leadership Dev. in Agric 
AEE 311 Comm. Method & Media 
ARE 303 Farm Mgmt 
BAE 323 Water Mgmt or 
SSC 200 Soil Science 
Agricultural Specialty" 
Plant Science Elective'^ 



2 
3 
3 

3-4 

3 

3 

17-18 



Spring Semester 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 

Agricultural Elective' 

Agricultural Specialty" 

Humanities or Social Science Elective' 

Free Elective 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

COM 226 Intro, to Public Relations 

AEE (ED) 426 Meth. of Teaching Agric 

Agricultural Specialty" 

Agricultural Specialty" 

Free Elective 



Spring Semester 

AEE 423 Prac. in Agricultrue Ext/lndust. 
AEE 478 Ext. as Non-Form. Education 
AEE (ED) 490 Seminar in AEE 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 124* 



•Note. Students must have demonstrated foreign language proficiency at the FL_I02 level. 

'Select from approved communication/speech electives. 

^Select history (HI) courses from the history elective list. 

'Mathematical sciences elective list. One course must be a math course. 

"The first two PE credits do not count toward graduation. 

'Select from Group C electives in agriculture or agriculture and resource economics courses. 

'Select a Chemistry course from the approved natural sciences courses. 

61 



'Select from the approved list of humanities and social sciences courses. Must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

"Select from approved literature elcciives 

'Select from approved list of natural science eleclives. Two of the three science courses must be laboratory courses. 

'"Select from the approved list of philosophy, religion, and visual & performing arts courses 

"Requires a minimum of twelve (12) semester hours from one area of agriculture or from forestry These courses must be in addition to courses completed 

as natural science requirements or courses in the agricultural content area. 

"Select from courses in botany, crop science, forestry or horticulture. 

CIRRICILI M IN AGRICl LTl RAL AND EXTENSION EDl'CATION. COMMUNICATION CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B,S. in Agricultural and Eilension Education 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro Topics in ALS 

COM 1 10 Public Speaking 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 

History Elective' 

Math Elective' 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits Spring Semester 

I AEE (ED) 226 Instr Technology in Agric. Ed. 

3 ANS 150 Intro to Animal Science 

3 BIO 125 General Biology 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp and Reading 

3 Math Elective' 

I Physical Education Elective' 
14 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 201 Shop Processes & Mgmt 

AEE 492 External Learning in AEE 

Agricultural Specialty'*^""" 

Chemistry Elective' 

ARE 201 or EC 201 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 COM 201 Theories of Persuasive Comm 

3 FOR 1 10 Intro to Forestry or 

3 FOR 252 Intro to Forest Science 

4 SSC 200 Soil Science 

3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 

16 Literature Elective' 



2-3 

4 

3 

3 
16-17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

AEE 31 1 Comm Methods & Media 
COM 326 Public Relations App. 
Agricultural Elective' 
Agricultural Specialty' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective* 
Social Science Elective' 



ts Spring Semester 

3 AEE 323 Lead Dev. in Agriculture 

3 COM 226 Intro to Public Relations 

3 AEE 470 Agricultural Communications 

3 Agricultural Specialty' 

3 Plant Science Elective'" 

3 Philosophy. Religion. Visual/Perform Arts Elective" 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

AEE (ED) 426 Methods of Teach. Agriculture 

COM 3 1 6 Comm Techniques for PR 

COM 456 Organizational Comm 

Agricultural Specialty' 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Spring Semester 

AEE 423 Pract in Agriculture Ext/Industry 

AEE (ED) 490 Seminar in AEE 

Free Elective 



Credits 
8 
1 
3 
12 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 125' 



'Note: Students must have demonstrated foreign language proficiency at the FL_I02 level. 



'Select history (HI) courses from the history elective list 

'Mathematical sciences elective list. One course must be a math course. 

'Requires a minimum of 12 semester hours from one area of agriculture or from forestry These courses must be in addition to courses from the agricultural 

content area or courses used to satisfy natural science requirements. 

'Select a chemistry course from the approved natural sciences courses 

'Select from the approved list of humanities and social sciences courses. One course must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'Select from approved literature electives. 

'Select from agricultural and resource economics courses or Group C electives in agriculture. 

'Select from approved list of politics and government courses or sociology courses. 

'Select from courses in botany, crop science, forestry or horticulture 

""Select from the approved list of philosophy, religion, and visual & performing arts courses. 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS 

Nelson Hall, Room 232 
Phone: (919)515-3107 



www.ag-econ.ncsu.edu 



J. A. Brandt, Head 

C. L. Moore, Associate Head and Extension Leader 

A. W. Oltmans, Coordinator of Undergraduate Programs 

W. N. Thurman, Administrator of Economics Graduate Programs 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: M.K. Wohlgenant, Professors: J. A. Brandt G.A. Carlson, L.E. Danielson, J.E. Easley, E. A. Estes, B.K. Goodwin, T.J. 
Grennes, M.T. Holt, T. Johnson, C.L. Moore, CD. Safley, R.A. Schrimper, W.N. Thurman, M.L. Walden, M. K. Wohlgenant; Adjunct Professor: J.B. 
Hunt, Jr.; Professors Emeriti: R.C. Brooks, A.J. Coutu, D.G. Harwood Jr., D.M. Hoover, LA. Ihnen, R.A. King, H.L. Liner, T.E. Nichols Jr., D.F. Neuman. 
E.G. Pasour, Jr., G.R. Pugh, J. A. Seagraves, R.L. Simmons. J.G. Sutherland (USDA), W.D. Toussaint, W.L. Turner, C.R. Weathers, R.C. Wells, J.C. 
Williamson It.; Associate Professors: G.A. Benson, A.B. Brown, PL. Fackler, M.C. Marra, AW. Oltmans, M.A. Renkow, T. Vukina, G.A. Wossink, K.D. 
Zering: Associate Professors Emeriti: J.G. Allgood, R.S. Boals, H.C. Gilliam Jr., D.D. Robinson, P.S. Stone; Assistant Professors: A. Inoue, D.J. Phaneuf, 
N.E. Piggott, R.A. ^arA\ Assistant Professors Emeriti: J. C. Matthews Jr., E.M. Stallings; Lecturers: A.M. Beals Jr., J.S. Russ, H.A. Sampson, 111; Adjunct 
Instructors: R.R. Gelblum, J.H. Kirch, J.M. Kuszaj, EC. Murphy, M. Wohlgenant; Extension Specialists: T.A. Feitshans, G. van der Hoeven, L.S. Smutko, 
R.H. Usry. 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics serves agricultural, resource and related industries through its extension, research and teaching 
programs. Applying principles of economics and related disciplines, these programs develop understanding of contemporary economic and business 
problems and equip students with knowledge of business organization fundamentals and decision-making skills useful in the operation and management of 
business firms. 

The department offers undergraduate programs leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Business Management. A concentration in biological 
sciences business management is offered within the agricultural business management program. The department also offers concentrations within two 
campus-wide degree programs: a natural resources economics and management concentration leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Resources ( 
see natural resources curriculum) and an economic policy concentration leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Sciences ( see 
environmental sciences curriculum). 

The Agricultural Business Management Program prepares graduates for management, marketing, sales, finance and related careers. The program has 
sufficient flexibility to provide more extensive course work in basic and applied science and math for those students desiring to prepare for advanced 
graduate study as well. The concentration in biological sciences business management prepares graduates for management, marketing, and sales careers in 
fields such as biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, health care, environmental protection, food processing and finance dealing with biological issues. This 
concentration is designed to be an attractive option for students with a strong background and interest in science who seek alternatives to technical science 
careers. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The growing number of specialized business firms producing and marketing services and products in agriculture, resource and life science-related industries 
has created an increasing demand for graduates trained in agricultural an biological sciences business management, resource economics and management 
and environmental policy. Employment opportunities include careers with companies purchasing, processing and marketing food, fiber and related products; 
firms producing and marketing production inputs ( feed, equipment, chemicals, drugs, etc. ) and services; banks; other financial and credit agencies; 
cooperatives; natural resources management units and consulting firms; and natural resources and environmental educational and regulatory agencies. 

Many graduates pursue careers in research and education with various state and federal government agencies. These agencies include the Cooperative 
Extension Service, the Agricultural Research Service, the State Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Environmental and Natural Resources, 
the United States Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 
Degree earned: B. S. in Agricultural Business Management 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 105 Biology in Modem WoHd and 

BIO 106 Biology in Modem Worid or 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 

MA 107PrecalculusI 

Any lOO-level PE in Fimess & Wellness' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

ARE 201 Intro, to Agri. & Res. Economics 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 

MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math Applications 

COM 110, 112, \46or2\l 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 121 Computer Applications or 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers & Uses 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Ub 

EC 202 Economic Problems and Issues 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 

Physical Education Elective' 



Credits 

3 
3 
I 
3 



15 



Spring Semester 
ACC 210 Accounting I or 
ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 
PY 131 Conceptual Physics or 
PY211 College Physics 
Biological Science Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 
Free Elective 



63 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

AR£(EC) 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 

ARE 303 Fann Bus Mgmt or 

ARE 304 Agribusiness Mgmt 

ARE 306 Agricultural Law or 

ARE 309 Environ Law 

ARE 490 Career Seminar in ARE 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 

Technical Agricultural Elective' 



13 Spring Semester 

3 ARE 3 II Agricultural Markets or 

ARE 312 Agribusiness Marketing 
3 BUS (ST) 350 Economics & Bus. Statistics or 

ST 3 1 1 Introduction to Statistics 
3 EC 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics or 

I EC 304 Intro to Fin Markets Alnstitutions or 

3 EC 348 Intro to International Economics 

3 ENG 332 Comm for Business &Management 

16 Technical Agricultural Elective' 



Credits 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 321 Agric. Financial Mgmt. or 

BUS 320 Financial Mgmt. 

ARE ElecUve 

Department' or Technical Agric' Electives 

Technical Agric Electives' 

Free Elective 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

ARE 433 US Agricultural Policy 

BUS 330 Human Res. Mgmt. or 

BUS 335 Organizational Behavior or 

EC 431 Labor Economics 

Departmental' or Technical Agric' Electives 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Minimum Hours Required Tor Graduation: 120 

Note: A minimum grade of C is required in ENG 1 1 1 and ENG 1 12. A grade point average of 2.0 in all ARE, ACC, BUS, EC and ECG courses attempted, 

and foreign language proflciency at the FL_I02 level are required to be eligible for graduation. One course from the Science, Technology, and Society 

(STS) lists are required for graduation, elect from either Humanities and Social Scicncc^r Science and Technology Perspective lists. 

'Two semester hours of PE w ith at least one at Fimess & Wellness 1 00-level . Additional hours can be used as free electives. 

'Humanities/Social Sciences Electives include five courses from the following GER lists: History & Literature: 2; Philosophy, Religionor Visual & 

Performing Arts: I . Humanities/Social Sciences: I . Social Sciences: 1 . Also, One of these courses must be from the GER non-English speaking 

culture list One may be from Science. Technology and Society (STS) list. 

'FromGN 301. NTR 301. orSSC 200 or Group A list in CALS section of Catalog. May be used to fulfill STS requirement. 

'Elect from Group C list in CALS section of Catalog or Forestry courses. May be used to fulfill STS requirement. 

'are (except ARE 401 & ARE 403). ACC, BUS. EC or ECG courses, or other courses approved by Undergraduate Coordinator. May be used to fulfill 

STS requirement 

Cl'RRICl LIM IN AGRICl LTl RAL BISINESS .MANAGEMENT, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Agricultural Business Management 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro, to Topics in ALS 
BIO 125 General Biology or 
BIO 183 Introductory Biology II 
ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 
MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 
MA 131 Analytic Geom & Calculus A 
Any 1 00-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Spring Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 1 2 Comp & Reading 

MA 1 14 Intro to Finite Math or 

MA 231 Analytic Geom & Calculus B 

Physical Education Elective 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 121 Computer Applications in ALS or 

CSC 200 Intro to Computers & Uses 

CH 201 ChemisUy - A Quantitative Science and 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab or 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

ZO 1 50 Animal Diversity or 

ZO 160 Intro Cell & Dev Zoology 

COM no. 112. 146. or 211 



Credits Spring Semester 

ACC 220 Accounting II or 

3 ACC220Accoumingll 
BO 200 Plant Life or 

MB 351 General Microbiology attd 
MB 352 Microbiology Lab 

4 BUS (ST) 350 Economics & Bus. Statistics or 
ST 3 1 1 Intro to Statistics or 

4 ST 361 Intro Statistics for Engineers 

3 PV 131 Conceptual Physics or 

14 PY 211 College Physics I 

Social Science Elective''' 



Credits 



64 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE (EC) 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 

ARE 306 Agricultural Law or 

ARE 309 Environ. Law & Economics Policy 

ARE 490 Career Seminar in ARE 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN411 Prin. of Genetics 

HI 322 Rise of Modem Science or 

HI 341 Technology in History 

Restricted Elective (ARE)' 



iits Spring Semester 

3 ARE 311 Agricultural Markets or 

ARE 312 Agribusiness Marketing or 
3 BUS 360 Marketing Methods 

1 BO 360 Intro, to Ecology and 

BO 365 Ecology Lab or 
3-4 BO 400 Plant Diversity or 

ZO 250 Animal Anatomy and Phy. or 
3 ZO 450 Evolutionary Biology 

3 Philosophy, Religion or V & P Arts Elective^ 

16-17 History or Literature Elective' 

Restricted ElecUve (ARE or CALS)' ' 



3-4 
3 
3 
3 
15-16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 321 Agricultural Financial Mgmt. or 

BUS 320 Financial Mgmt. 

COM 201 Persuasion Theory 

EC 302 Intermediate Microeconomics or 

EC 304 Intro to Financial Mkts & Inst or 

EC 348 Intro to International Econ. 

Restricted Elective (ARE or CALS)" 



Spring Semester 

BUS (EC) 310 Managerial Economics 
ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr & Technology or 
ENG 332 Comm. for Bus. & Mgmt. or 
ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Research 
Restricted Elective (ARE or CALS)" 
Free Electives 



Credits 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 120 

Note: A minimum grade of C in ENG 1 1 1 and ENG 1 12, a grade point average of 2.000 in all ACC, ARE, BUS. EC and ECG courses attempted, and 

foreign language proficiency at the FL_102 level are required to be eligible for graduation. One course from the General Education Requirement (GER) 

lists for Science, Technology, and Society (STS) lists is required for graduation: select from Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective list or Science and 

Technology Perspective list. HI 322. HI 342. BO(ZO) 360/365, GN 301 or Restricted Elective courses can be used. 

'Two semester hours of PE with at least one at the Fitness & Wellness lOO-level. Additional hours can be used as free electives. 

'One Humanities and Social Science elective must be from the non-English speaking culture course list. 

'Restricted electives (ARE) include all ARE Courses (except ARE 401 and ARE 403) and 500-level ECG courses. 

'Restricted electives (CALS) include all undergraduate courses offered within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

'Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology, and Cultural Geography. 

MINOR IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics offers a minor in Agricultural Business Management. This minor provides students an oppoftunity 
to learn basic concepts useful in many careers in agricultural business. A total of 15 hours of coursework is required, including ARE 201, and four 
additional courses chosen from a list of selected courses in agricultural and resource economics and related business fields. Consult the Department for 
specific information. 

CURRICULA IN AGRONOMY 

D. A. Knauft, Head of the Department of Crop Science 
J. L. Havlin, Head of the Department of Soil Science 
C. D. Raper Jr., Director of Graduate Programs. Soil Science 
R. P. Patterson, Undergraduate Coordinator— Crop Science 
H. J. Kleiss, Undergraduate Coordinator— Soil Science 
R. C. Rufty, Director of Graduate Programs— Crop Science 

Agronomy is the development and practical application of plant and soil sciences to produce abundant, high quality food, feed, fiber and specialty crops in 
an environmentally sustainable manner. Agronomists serve a vital role in global agriculture and the maintenance of environmental quality. Students may 
earn a Bachelor of Science degree within the technology curriculum of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences with a major in Agronomy. The 
agronomy curriculum is administered jointly by the Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science. Crop Science relates primarily to the genetics, breeding, 
physiology and management of field crops and turf. Soil Science is oriented toward soil physics, chemistry, origin, microbiology, fertility and management. 
For further information and employment opportunities, see the departmental headings for Crop Science and Soil Science. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRONOMY, AGRONOMIC SCIENCES CONCENTRATION 

Degree earned: B.S. in Agronomy 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Inn-o. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 131 Calculus for Life and Mgmt. Science A 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

I BO 200 Plant Life 

4 CH 101 A Molecular Science 

3 CH 102 General ChemisU^ Lab 

3 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

1 MA 132 Comp. Math for Life & Mgmt. Science 

3 MA 23 1 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Science 

16 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



65 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 121 Comp AppI in Agric & Life Science or 

CSC 200 Intro lo Compulers & Their Uses or 

ST 3 1 1 Intro to Statistics 

CH 201 Chemlstr> - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistrv l^b 

COM 1 10 Public Speaking 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

Physical Education Elective' 



3 
3 
I 
3 
4 
I 
15 



Spring Semester 

ARE 201 Intro, to Agric Res Economics 

CH 221 Organic Chcmisto I 

CS 2 1 3 Crops: Adaptation & Production 

Humanities/Social Science Elective"' 

Writing/Speaking Elective' 



Credits 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

CS 414 Weed Science 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility &. Fertilizers 

SSC 342 Soil Fertility- Lab 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Spring Semester 

BO 42 1 Plant Physiology 

GN4II Prin of Genetics 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Credits 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BCH 45 1 Prin of Biochemistry 

CS 41 1 Environ Aspects of Crop Production 

CS 415 Agronomic Pest Mgmt Systems 

ENT 425 General Entomology or 

PP 3 1 5 Prin of Plant Pathology 

PY2II College Physics I 



4 
2 
3 

3-4 

4 

16-17 



Spring Semester 
CS 413 Plant Breeding 
CS(SSC) 490 Senior Seminar 
MB 351 General Microbiology 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 
Free Elective 



Credits 
2 
1 

4 
3 

3-4 
13-14 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 125* 



'Four semester hours of (PE) physical education (including any 100-level Fitness & Wellness) credit are required for graduation; the first two hours may be 
counted for fire elective credit If a student chooses not to count these first two hours as free elective, these hours will not count toward graduation and two 
additional hours of free electives must be completed 
' Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements arc 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. Two courses from the History and Literature Electives Lists. 

B. One course from the Philosophy. Religion, or Visual and Performing Arts Electives Lists. 

C. One course ftx)m the Psychology. Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology, or Cultural Geography Elective Lists. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) Electives List. 

E. One course among those elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements must focus on non-English speaking culture. 

F. It is suggested that one course elected lo fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and Society 
(Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) elective list If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this list must be 
taken as a Free Elective 

"The Writing and Speaking Elective requirement includes ( 1 ) course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives List. 
'Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level is required for graduation. 

CURRICliLtM IN AGRONOMY, AGRONOMIC Bl'SINESS CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in .\eronomy 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 102 Intro Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp & Rhetoric 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus 

Any 100-level PE in Fimess & Wellness' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 BO 200 Plant Life 

4 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

3 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp & Reading 

I MA 132 Comp Math for Life & Mgmt Science 

3 BAE 121 Comp. AppI in Agric & Life Science or 

15 CSC 200 Intro, to Computers and Their Uses or 

ST 311 Intro to Statistics 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



66 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. Res. Economics 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

COM 110 Public Speaking 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

Physical Education Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 
CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry 
CS 213 Crops; Adaptation & Production 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 
Writing/Speaking Elective' 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CS 414 Weed Science 

ENT 425 General Entomology or 

PP 3 1 5 Prin. of Plant Pathology 

PY 211 College of Phyics I 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility & Fertilizers 

SSC 342 Soil Fertility Lab 



Credits 



4 

3 

1 

15-16 



Spring Semester 

ANS(HS) 215 Basic Agricultural Genetics or 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

EC 202 Economic Problems & Issues 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 



Credits 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 303 Farm Mgmt. 

ARE 3 1 1 Agricultural Markets 

CS 41 1 Crop Ecology 

CS 415 Argonomic Pest Mgmt. Systems 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 



Spring Semester 

CS 462 Soil-Crop Mgmt. Systems 
CS (SSC) 490 Senior Seminar 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Electives 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 

6-7 
16-17 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 125^ 

'Two credit hours of PE (including any lOO-Ievel Fitness & Wellness) are required for graduation 
'The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. Two courses from the History and Literature Electives Lists. 

B. One course from the Philosophy, Religion, or Visual and Performing Arts Electives Lists. 

C. One course from the Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology, or Cultural Geography Elective Lists. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) Electives List. 

E. One course among those elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements must focus on non-English speaking culture. 

F. It is suggested that one course elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and Society 
(Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) elective list. If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this list must be 
taken as a Free Elective. 

'The Writing and Speaking Elective requirement includes one course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives 

List 

'Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level is required for graduation. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRONOMY, CROP PRODUCTION CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Agronomy 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 102 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

I BO 200 Plant Life 

4 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

3 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

1 tVlA 132 Comp. Math for Life & Mgmt. Science 

3 BAE 121 Comp. Appl. in Agric. & Life Science or 

15 CSC 200 Intro, to Computers and Their Uses or 

ST 3 11 Intro, to Statistics 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

COM 110 Public Speaking 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

Humanites/Soc.ScienceElective' 

Physical Education Elective' 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. Res. Economics 

CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry 

CS 213 Crops: Adaptation & Production 

PY 211 College Physics I 



Credits 



67 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Stmeiier 

CS 312 Grassland Mgml. 

CS 414 Weed Science 

ENT 425 General Eniomology or 

PP 315 Prin of Plant Palholog> 

SSC 341 Soil Fertilit> & Fertilizers 

SSC 342 Soil Fertilit> Lab 



3 
4 

3-4 

3 

1 

14-15 



Spring Semester 

ANS 2 1 5 (HS) Basic Agricultural Genetics 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

SSC 452 Soil Classirication 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Wnling/Speaking Elective' 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 303 Farm Mgmt 

CS 41 1 Crop Ecology 

CS 415 Argonomic Pest Mgmt Systems 

SSC 461 Physical Properilies of Plant Growth 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



CrtdiU 



Spring Semester 

CS413 Plant Breeding 

CS 462 Soil-Crop Mgmt. Systems 

CS (SSC) 490 Senior Seminar 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Free Electives 



Credits 
2 
3 
1 
3 

6-7 
15-16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduatioii: 125* 



'Two credits of PE (including any lOO-level Fitness &. Wellness) are required for graduation. 

'The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements arc 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. Two courses from the History and Literature Electives Lists 

B One course from the Philosophy. Religion, or Visual and Performing Arts Electives Lists. 

C. One course from the Psychology. Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology, or Cultural Geography Elective Lists. 

D Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) Electives List. 

E One course among those elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements must focus on non-English speaking culture 

F It is suggested that one course elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements also come from the Science. Technology, and Society 

(Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) elective list If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this list must be 

taken as a Free Elective 

^e Writing and Speaking Elective requirement includes ( I ) course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives List 

'Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level is required for graduation. 

CI RRICl LI M IN AGRONOMY. SOIL SCIENCE CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B^. in Agronomy 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 102 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp & Rhetoric 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 BO 200 Plant Life 

4 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

3 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp & Reading 

1 MA 132 Comp Math for Life & Mgmt. Science 

3 BAE 121 Comp, Appl. in Agric. & Life Science or 

15 CSC 200 Intro, to Computers and Their Uses or 

ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 



Fall Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantiuiivc Chemistry Lab 

COM 110 Public Speaking 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

MEA 101 Geology 1: Physical 

MEA 1 10 Geology I Lab 

Physical Education Elective' 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric Res. Economics 

CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry 

CS 2 1 3 Crops: Adaptation & Production 

Writing/Speaking Elecitve' 

Free Elective 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CS 414 Weed Science 

PY 211 College Physics I 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility & Fertilizers 

SSC 342 Soil Fertility Lab 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Spring Semester 

ANS 215 (HS) Basic Agricultural Genetics 
SSC 452 Soil Classification 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Elective 



Credits 



68 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE (SSC)323 Water Mgmt. 

BAE 324 Elementary Surveying 

CS411 Crop Ecology 

CS 415 Agronomic Pest Mgmt. Systems 

SSC 461 Soil Phys. Propert. of Plant Growth 



Spring Semester 

BO 421 Plant Physiology or 

CS 462 Soil-Crop Mgmt. Systems 

SSC (CS) 490 Senior Seminar 

SSC 361 Role Soils in Envir. Mgmt. 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 



Credits 



(4) 
3 
3 
3 

3 
14 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 126' 

'Two credits of PE (including any 100-level Fimess & Wellness) are required for graduation. 
^The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. Two courses from the History and Literature Electives Lists. 

B. One course from the Philosophy, Religion, or Visual and Performing Arts Electives Lists. 

C. One course from the Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology, or Cultural Geography Elective Lists. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) Electives List. 

E. One course among those elected to fiilfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements must focus on non-English speaking culture. 

F. It is suggested that one course elected to fiilfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and Society 
(Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) elective list. If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this list must be 
taken as a Free Elective. 

'The Writing and Speaking Elective requirement includes one course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives 

List 

'Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level is required for graduation. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRONOMY, TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Agronomy 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 102 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 



Credits Spring Semester 

I BO 200 Plant Life 

4 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

3 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 1 2 Comp. & Reading 

I MA 132 Comp. Math for Life & Mgmt. Science 

3 BAE 121 Comp. Appl. in Agric. & Life Science or 

15 CSC 200 Intro, to Computers and Their Uses or 

ST 3 1 1 Intro, to Statistics 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Credits 
4 
3 
1 
3 
1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantiutive Chemistry Lab 

COM 110 Public Speaking 

CS 200 Intro, to Turf Mgmt. 

CS 213 Crops: Adaptation & Production 

Physical Education Elective' 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
I 
16 



Spring Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. Res. Economics 
CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry 
SSC Soil Science 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Writing/Speaking Elecitve' 



Credits 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CS 414 Weed Science 

ENT 425 General Entomology or 

PP 315 Prin. of Plant Pathology 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility & Fertilizers 

SSC 342 Soil Fertility Lab 

Humanites/Soc. Science Elective' 



Credits 
4 

3-4 

3 

I 

3 

14-15 



Spring Semester 

ANS (HS) 215 Basic Agricultural Genetics or 
GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 
BO 421 Plant Physiology 
PY 21 1 College Physics I 
SSC 452 Soil ClassificaUon 



Credits 

3 
4 
4 
4 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CS 400 Turf Cultural Systems 

CS 41 1 Crop Ecology 

SSC 461 Soil Physical Prop, of Plant Growth 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

CS 4 1 5 Agronomic Pest Mgmt. Systems 

CS (SSC) 490 Senior Seminar 

HS 342 Landscape Horticulture or 

HS 471 Trees & Grounds 

Free Electives 



Credits 
3 



3-4 
7-8 
14-16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 124* 



69 



'Two credits of PE (including any 100-level Fitness & Wellness) are required for graduation. 
^The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. Two courses from the History and Literature Electives Lists. 

B. One course from the Philosophy, Religion, or Visual and Performing Arts Electives Lists. 

C. One course from the Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology, or Cultural Geography Elective Lists. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) Electives List. 

E. One course among those elected to fiilfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements must focus on non-English speaking culture. 

F. It is suggested that one course elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and Society 
(Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) elective list. If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this list must be 
taken as a Free Elective. 

'The Writing and Speaking Elective requirement includes (1) course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives List. 
'Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level is required for graduation. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Polk Hall, Room 123 
Phone: (919)515-2755 

K.L. Esbenshade, Head 

Alumni Distinguished Professors: J.C. Comwell, K.L. Esbenshade, W.L. Flowers; William Neal Reynolds Professor: E.J. Eisen; Professors: L.S. Bull, R.G. 
Crickenberger, R.L. McCraw, B.T. McDaniel, R.A. Mowrey Jr., R.M. Fetters, O.W. Robison, J.W. Spears, L.W. Whitlow; Adjunct Professor: S.D. 
Perreault; Professors Emeriti: A.V. Allen, R.F. Behlow, T.C. Blalock, D.G. Braund, K.R. Butcher, E.V. Caruolo, D.G. Davenport, R.W. Harvey, W.L. 
Johnson, E.E. Jones, JR. Jones, F.N. Knott, C.A. Lassiter, J.M. Leatherwood, J.G. Lecce, C.L. Markert, R.D. Mochrie, R.M. Myers, OS. Parsons, J.W. 
Patterson, AH. Rakes, H.A. Ramsey, F.D. Sargent, F.H. Smith, CM. Stanislaw, J.C. Wilk, G.H. Wise, JR. Woodard; Associate Professors: B.P. Alston- 
Mills, J.H. Eisemann, C.E. Farin, B.A. Hopkins, Hopkins, RE. Lichtenwalner, W.E.M. Morrow, J. Odie, M.H. Poore, M.T. See, S.P. Washburn; Visiting 
Associate Professor: G.G. Gomez; Adjunct Associate Professors:Ml . Coffey, E.C. Segerson; Associate Professors Emeriti: E.U. Dillard, J.J. McNeil; 
Assistant Professors: S.L. Ash, V. Fellner, R.J. Harrell, G.B. Huntington, JR. Kubiak, J.M. Luginbuhl, J.A. Moore, E. van Heugten, T.A. van Kempen, C.S. 
Whisnant, CM. Williams; Lecturer: M. Yoder; Extension Specialists: B.C. Allison, J.S. Clay, G.R. Griffin, DC. Miller, D.E. Pritchard; Extension Specialist 
Emeritus: J.H. Gregory, J.W. Parker, R.W. Swain; Associate Members of the Faculty: G.W. Almond (Food Animal and Equine Medicine, CVM), L.S. Bull 
(International Programs), G.A. Benson (Agricultural and Resource Economics); J.C Bums (USDA); J.C Comwell (CALS Academic Programs), R.G. 
Crickenberger (Agriculture and Natural Resources); W.M. Hagler (Plant Pathology, Poultry Science); D.K. Larick (Food Science); BR. Poulton 
(Curriculum & Instruction); M.D. Whitacre (Food Animal and Equine Medicine, CVM). 

Animal Science is a broad field centered on the biology, production, management, and care of domestic animals. Animals have, throughout history, provided 
man with a major source of food, fiber, pleasure and companionship. Undergraduate students study subjects related to various phases of animal science. 
Courses are offered in anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics, and management, and there are opportunities for the application of basic scientific training in 
the husbandry areas. Options for course selection by each student make it possible for those with varying backgrounds and wide-ranging interests to become 
involved in stimulating and rewarding experiences. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities for animal scientists are boundless and the areas of emphasis are diverse. Animal science graduates are qualified for positions in a wide 
variety of areas such as: livestock production, animal management, feed and animal health product companies, livestock marketing, food processing 
industries, feedlot managers, management consultants, state and federal departments of agriculture, breed associations, education, financial institutions, 
livestock publications, technical service managers, animal technicians, media specialists, agricultural extension service and public relations. Animal 
scientists can be found across the nation and around the world in all phases of production, research, sales, service, business and education. Many students in 
pre-veterinary medicine obtain degrees in animal science. Students may elect graduate study, after which they will find opportunities in teaching, research, 
and extension. See listing of graduate degrees offered. 

CURRICULA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in animal science may be obtained under either the science or industry curricula offered in the College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. The science curriculum (SAS) is designed for students with interest in advanced study in disciplines such as physiology, 
nufrition, and genetics. Many students in pre-veterinary medicine are enrolled in this curriculum pursuing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Animal Science. 
The industry (IAS) curriculum is for students interested in entry into the animal industry or allied businesses. It offers flexibility in complementing animal 
science with business, economics, and applied science course work. 

MINOR IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

A minor in Animal Science is open to all interested baccalaureate students. This minor is appropriate for (but not limited to) students majoring in 
Agricultural Business Management, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education, Agronomy, Food Science, Poultry Science and Zoology. Students 
completing a minor in Animal Science will become familiar with animal production and with its related industries. The minor requires a minimum of 15 
credit hours with a grade of C or better, including 8 hours in required courses and 7 hours in elective courses. The program is flexible in order that students 
may emphasize the discipline or species of their interest. 



70 



INDUSTRY CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Degree earned: B.S. in Animal Science 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics In ALS 

ANS 150 Intro, to Animal Science 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA lOTPrecalculusI 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

4 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

4 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

3 MA 114 Intro. Finite Math Appl. or 

3 MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

1 MA 131 Calculus for Life and Mgmt. Science A 

16 Free Elective 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
I 
3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ANS 205 Anatomy & Phys. of Domestic Animals 

ANS (HS) 2 1 5 Basic Agricultural Genetics 

ARE 201 Intro, to Agric. Res. Economics or 

EC 205 Fund, of Economics 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

Comm/Speech Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ANS 220 Repro., Lact. & Behav. of Dom. Anim. 

3 CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry 1 

3 ST 3 1 1 Intro, to Statistics or 

3 ST(BUS) 350 Econ. & Bus. Statistics 

1 ANS Applied Science & Tech. Elective ' 

1 History Elective ' 
16 



Credits 
4 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ANS 230 Nutrition & Growth of Dom. Animals 

PY 131 Conceptual Physics 

Economics or Bus. Elective* 

Free Electlves 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
6 
17 



Spring Semester 

Restricted Electlves' 

Economics or Bus. Elective* 

ANS Applied Science & Tech. Elective ' 

Literature Elective' 



Credits 
8 
3 
2 
3 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ANS Management Elective ' 
Humanities/Social Science. Electlves' 
Restricted Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ANS Discipline Elective'" 

9 ANS Mgmt. Elective' 

3 Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

15 Restricted Elective' 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 126 

'Two semester hours of PE credit are required for graduation. One of these courses must be a Fitness & Wellness 100-level. 

'Select COM 110, Public Speaking, or COM 112, Interpersonal Communication, or COM 146, Business and Professional Communication or COM 21 1 

Argumentation and Advocacy. 

'Course must be selected from the list of approved Animal Science Applied Science and Technology courses. Total of 5 credit hours is required from the 

following: 



ANS 105, Intro, to Companion Animals (3) 
ANS 1 10, Intro, to Equine Science (3) 
ANS 201, Techniques of Animal Care (2) 
ANS 202, Techniques of Horse Care (2) 
ANS 210, Microcomputers Animal Prod. (2) 



ANS 303, Prin. of Equine Evaluation (3) 
ANS (FS) 322, Muscle Foods & Eggs (3) 
ANS (FS) 324, Milk & Dairy Products (2) 
ANS (PO) 425, Feed Mill Mgmt. (3) 
VMF 420, Diseases of Farm Animals (3) 



'Course must be selected from the approved GER History Electlves List. 

'Economics or Business Elective 

A. One course in management or marketing selected from the following: 



ARE 303 Farm Management 

ARE 304 Agribusiness Management 

B. One course from the following: 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 
ARE 303 Farm Management 
ARE 304 Agribusiness Management 
ARE 306 Agricultural Law 
ARE 309 Environmental Law 
ARE 3 1 1 Agricultural Markets 
ARE 312 Agribusiness Marketing 



ARE 3 1 1 Agricultural Markets 
ARE 312 Agribusiness Marketing 



ARE 321 Agricultural Financial Management 

BUS 307 Bus. Law 

BUS 310 Managerial Economics 

BUS 320 Financial Management 

BUS 330 Human Resource Management 

BUS 360 Marketing Methods 



71 



'Restricted Electives must be chosen from Groups A,B or C as listed in the University Bulletin. 

Course must be selected from the approved GER Literature Electives List. 8 Students must select at least two animal management course from the 
following list: 



ANS 400, Companion Animal Mgmt (3) 
ANS 402, Beef Cattle Mgmt. (3) 
ANS 403 Swine Management (3) 



ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management (3) 
ANS 410 Equine Management (3) 



' These courses must be selected from the approved GER list for Humanities and Social Sciences as follows: 

Philosophy, Religion or Visual & Performing Arts (3) 

Psychology or Politics and Government or sociology or anthropology or cultural geography (3) 

Science, Technology & Society from a Humanities/Social Science Perspective (3) 

The final 3 credits may be from any courses in the aforementioned categories or economics or history or literature or humanities/social sciences additional 

list. 

At least one course in the Humanities and Social Sciences must focus on a non-English-speaking culture. 

'"Course must be selected from the list of approved Animal Science Discipline Courses. Total of 3 credit hours is required from the following: 



ANS 340, Selection of Domestic Animals (3) 
ANS 415, Comparative Nutrition (3) 
ANS (NTR) 419, Human Nutrition (3) 



ANS 452, Advanced Reprd. Physio. (3) 

ANS 453, Growth & Dev. of Domestic Animals (3) 

ANS 454, Lactation, Milk and Nutrition (3) 



SCIENCE CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 
Degree earned: B.S. in Animal Science 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

ANS 150 Infro. to Animal Science 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA I07PrecalculusI 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits Spring Semester 

I CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

4 CH 1 02 General Chemistry Lab 

4 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

3 MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

3 MA 131 Calculus for Life and Mgmt. Science A 

1 Free Elective 

16 Physical Education. Elective' 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 

3 
3 
3 
14 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ANS 205 Anatomy & Physio, of Dom. Animals 

ANS (HS) 215 Basic Agricultural Genetics 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ARE 201 Intro, to Ag & Resource Econ. or 

EC 205 Fund, of Econ. 

Comm./Speech Elective^ 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
1 

3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

ANS 220 Repro., Lact. & Behav. of Dom. Anim. 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

ST 311 Infro. to Statistics 

ANS Course' 

History Elective' 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ANS 230 Nurtitlon of Domestic Animals 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

MB 351 General Microbiology 

MB 352 General Microbiology Lab 

PY21I College Physics I 



Fall Semester 

ANS Discipline Course Elective ' 
Humanities/Social Science. Electives' 
Free Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
1 
4 
16 



Spring Semester 

Restricted Elective (Group A, B or C) ' 

GN 41 1 Prin. of Genetics 

PY 212 College Physics II 

ANS Course ' 

Literature Elective' 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

3 ANS Discipline Course Elective ' 

9 ANS Mgmt. Elective' 

3 Humanities/Social Science. Electives' 

15 Free Electives 



Credits 
4 
4 
4 
2 
3 
17 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
6 
IS 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 126 

'Two semester hours of PE credit are required for graduation. One of these courses must be a Fimess & Wellness lOO-level. 

' Select COM 1 10, Public Speaking, or COM 1 12, Interpersonal Communication, or COM 146, Business and Professional Communication, or COM 21 1 

Argumentation and Advocacy. 

' Course must be selected from the approved GER History Electives List. 

' Select any Animal Science (ANS) course. Total of 5 credits is required. 



72 



' Course must be selected from the approved GER Literature Electives List. 

'Course must be selected from the list of approved Animal Science Discipline courses. Total of 6 credits is required: 



ANS 340, Selection of Domestic Animals (3) 
ANS 415, Comparative Nutrition (3) 
ANS (NTR) 419, Human Nutrition (3) 



ANS 452, Advanced Reprd. Physio. (3) 

ANS 453, Growth & Dev. of Domestic Animals (3) 

ANS 454, Lactation, Milk and Nutrition (3) 



'These courses must be selected from the approved GER listing for Humanities and Social Sciences as follows: 

Philosophy, Religion, or Visual and Performing Arts (3 credits) 

Psychology or Politics and Government or Sociology or Anthropology or Cultural Geography (3 credits) 

Science, Technology, and Society from a Humanities and Social Science Perspective (3 credits) 

The final 3 credits may be from any courses in the aforementioned categories or Economics or History or Literature or Humanities/Social Sciences 

Additional List. 

At one course in the Humanities/Social Sciences must focus on a non- English speaking culture. 

' Students must select at least one animal management course from the following list: 

ANS400, 402, 403, 404, 410. 

'Students planning to apply to a college of veterinary medicine should take BCH 451 (Prin. of Biochemistry) to fill the A,B,C elective category. Many 

graduate schools also require biochemistry. 



www.cals.ncsu.edu^iochem/ 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY 

Polk Hall, Room 128 
Phone: (919)515-2581 

D.T. Brown, Head and Director of Graduate Programs 
J. A. Knopp, Undergraduate Coordinator 

William Neal Reynolds Professor:W.L. Miller; Professors: P.P. Agris, E.S. Maxwell, J.D. Otvos, EC. Sisler, PL. Wollenzien; Adjunct Professors: K. S. 
Korach, M. Luther, M. Milbum, EC. Theil; Professors Emeriti: F.B. Armstrong, H. R. Horton, J.S. Kahn, LS. Longmuir, E.C. Theil; Associate Professors: 
L.K. Hanley- Bowdoin, C.C. Hardin, C.L. Hemenway, J. A. Knopp; Assistant Professors: AC. Clark, C. Mattos; Visiting Assistant Professors: D.G. 
Presutti, H.S. Gracz; Associate Members of the Faculty: H.M. Hassan (Microbiology), R.R. SederofT (Forestry , Genetics), H.E. Swaisgood (Food Science), 
D.E. Sayers (Physics). 

The Biochemistry is the science which is concerned with the discovery and understanding of the chemical principles of life. It is a wide ranging field from 
the composition, biosynthesis, structure and frinction of biomolecules to the control and regulation of biochemical processes within organelles, cells, organs 
and organisms. Biochemical principles form the basis of most laboratory procedures within the life sciences. 

OPPORTIIMTIES 

The Biochemistry program provides B.S. graduates with the scientific background and skills required for employment in university, industrial, state, and 
federal research laboratories. The curriculum is especially suited to students preparing for graduate study in biochemistry, molecular biology, 
biotechnology, and genetics and for the health fields of medicine, veterinary science pharmacology and related fields. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

H. Robert Horton Award This award is given to the outstanding student in Biochemistry based on scholarly and research achievements as selected by the 
Biochemistry graduate students. 

HONORS IN BIOCHEMISTRY 

The honors in Biochemistry program is jointly administered within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences. It is designed for those students who wish to explore advanced courses and be rewarded for outstanding academic achievement. 

To be admitted to the honors program, a student must complete the three semester sequence of Calculus (MA 141, 241, 242) and the calculus based Physics 
sequence (PY 205 and 208). Exceptions can be made for transfer students. Students with a GPA of at least 3.5 are invited into the program in their Junior 
year. To complete the program, a student must take the two semester Physical Chemistry sequence (CH 431 and 433), at least three hours of research and 
six more hours of advanced or honors courses. Interested students should contact the Undergraduate Coordinator of Biochemistry for more detailed 
information. 

CURRICULUM 

The curriculum emphasizes the ftindamentals of biological and physical sciences, offering students both breadth of knowledge and depth of understanding. 
It is designed to provide students with broad experience in biological and chemical sciences and to encourage the development of experimental skills. One 
important aspect is the requirement of at least one semester experience in a Biochemical laboratory. Because of the breadth of the course requirements, 
many students can easily add a second major in Biological Sciences, Chemistry, and other science as well as add a minor in Genetics. 



CURRICULUM IIS BIOCHEMISTRY 
Degree earned: B.S. in Biochemistry 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 181 or 125 General Biology 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 

MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A or 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I' 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



4 
3 
1 
3 

4 
15-16 



Spring Semester 

BIO 183 or Botany/Zoology Elective^ 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

ENG 1 12 Comp.& Reading 

MA 231 Calculus for Life & Management Science or 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II' 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 

3-4 
14-15 



73 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III or 

ST 311 Intro, to Statistics' 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Science I or 

PY211 College Physics I' 

Biological Science Elective^ 

Physical Education Elective' 



Fall Semester 

BCH 451 Prin. of Biochemistry 
BCH 452 Intro. Biochemistry Lab 
GN411 Prin. of Genetics 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 
Free Elective' 



Credits 
4 



3-4 



4 
3-4 

1 
15-17 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 
CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 
PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sc. II or 
PY 212 College Physics II' 
Computer, Math or Statistics Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Physical Education Elective* 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

4 BCH 453 Metabolism & Molecular Biology 

2 ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Technology or 
4 ENG 333 Advanced Writing' 

3 MB 35 1 General Microbiology 

3 MB 352 General Microbiology Lab 

16 Cell Biology or Physiology Elective' 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective* 



Credits 
3 
1 

4 
3 
3 



Credits 
3 

3 
3 
1 
3-4 
3 
16-17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BCH 454 Advanced Biochemistry Lab or 

Research Elective' 

CH 331 Intro. Physical Chemistry or 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry 1'° 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective* 

Free Elective(s) 



Credits 

3-4 

3-4 
3 

3-6 
15-17 



Spring Semester 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II or 

Advised Elective 11'° 

Humanities/Social Sciences Electives' 

Lab Analysis Elective" 

Free Elective 



3 

6 

3-4 
0-3 
12-16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation' : 124 



'There are two sequences of math classes (for a total of 12 hours): 3-semester calculus sequence, MA 141,241,242 which is prerequisite to CH 431 and CH 

433, and is strongly recommended iot sluitnXs y/ho xi\an graduate studies in Biochemistry anA MA 131, MA 231, ST 311 plus an additional 3 hour advised 

math elective. 

^The preferred sequence is BIO 181, BIO 183 and one course from the following list; ZO 250, ZO 208, ZO 212, BO 250 or BO 213. Alternative sequences 

include: BIO 125, ZO 150 and BO 200 or BO 213; ZO 150 and ZO 250. Botany or Zoology elective to be selected from BO 200, BO 213, BO 250, ZO 

201,ZO205,orZO208. 

'There are two sequences of physics classes: the calculus-based physics sequence, PY 205 and PY 208, which is recommended for students who plan 

graduate studies in Biochemistryand PY 21 1 and PY 212. 

'Two PE credits are required for graduation, one of which must be at the lOO-level. 

'To be selected from GER list. Two courses from the GER History and Literature Electives Lists; one course from the GER Philosophy, Religion, or Visual 

& Performing Arts Electives Lists; one course from the GER Economics Electives List; one course from the GER Psychology, Politics & Government, 

Sociology, Anthropology, or Cultural Geography Electives Lists; one additional course selected from any Humanities or Social Sciences Electives; and one 

course that must focus on Science and Technology from a humanities/social perspective. 

*An advised elective course in computer science (CSC 200, BAE 121, etc.), in mathematics (with a calculus prerequisite) or in statistics. 

'To be selected from the GER Advanced Writing-Major Paper Requirement Options: ENG 331 or ENG 333. 

'Cell Biology/Physiology electives include BO 421 (4 cr), PO 405 (4 cr), ZO 421 (3 cr), and ZO(BO) 414 (3 cr). 

'Research electives may be selected from BCH 492 or BCH 493 or ALS 498H and ALS 499H. (Research only). 

"^e 2-semester Physical ChemisUy sequence, CH 43 1 and CH 433, is recommended for students who plan graduate studies in Biochemistry. 

"Lab Analysis electives include CH 3 1 5 (4 cr), CH 428 (3 cr), and FS 403 (3 cr). BCH 454 (4 cr) may also be selected as a Lab Analysis elective by students 

who take at least 3 credit hours of Research elective(s). 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

David S. Weaver Laboratories Room 100 
Phone: (919)515-2694 

D. B. Beasley, Head 

R. O. Evans, Jr., Department Extension Leader 
J. H. Young, Director of Graduate Programs 
C. G. Bowers, Jr.. Undergraduate Coordinator 

Distinguished University Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: R.W. S\^a%,%s,Professors: C.F. Abrams Jr., J.C. Barker, D.B. Beasley, R.W. 
Bottcher, C.J. Bowers Jr., F.J. Humenik, E.G. Humphries, W.H. Johnson, G.J. Kriz, W.F. McClure, R.P. Rohrbach, A.R. Rubin, R.S. Sowell, L.F. 
Sfrikeleather, P.W. Westerman, T.B. Whitaker (USDA), D.H. Willits, J.H. \o\inz„ Adjunct Professors: F.E. Barton II, L.M. Safley Jr., S.S. Schiffman, L.M. 
Sykes; Professors Emeriti: G.B. Blum Jr., H.D. Bowen, J.W. Dickens, L.B. Driggers, J.M. Fore, G.W. Giles, EL. Howell, F.M. Richardson, RE. Sneed, 
C.W. Suggs, R.W. Watkins, EH. Wiser; Associate Professors: G.R. Baughman, S.M. Blanchard, M.D. Boyette, R.O. Evans, Jr., R.L. Huffman, G.D. 
Jennings, J.E. Parsons; Visiting Associate Professors: G.T. Roberson, J. Spooner, Assistant Professors: J. Cheng, J.J. Classen, S.A. \id\e\Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: D.D. Archibald, R.L. Langley, S.K. Seymour; Senior Researcher: S.C. Mohapatra: Extension Specialists: E.J. Hewett, III, W.F. Hunt, D.E. Line, 



74 



R.L. McLymore, J.M. Rice, R.E. Sheffield, R.L. Sherman, Associate Members of the Faculty: C.R. Daubert (Food Science), BE. Farkas (Food Science), 
A.E. Hassan (Forestry), T.M. Losordo (Zoology), S.C. Roe (Companion Animal & Special Species Medicine), K.R. Swaitzel (Food Science). 

The department offers Bachelors of Science in Biological Engineering, and Agricultural and Environmental Technology. Biological engineering "brings 
engineering to life" and applies engineering to biological systems. Students analyze and develop solutions to unique problems of biological and agricultural 
systems. An area of concentration in the Biological Engineering Curriculum can be chosen whereby scientific and engineering principles are applied to 
problems in a particular area. The Biological and Agricultural Engineering department may be viewed on the World Wide Web at: 
http://www2.ncsu.edu^ae 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The Biological Engineering Curriculum provides opportunities for students to conceptualize, design, and develop systems for producing, processing, and 
packaging a high quality food supply, maintaining a high quality environment, and improving the quality of life for people and animals, will provide many 
opportunities for graduates of the biological engineering curriculum. Jobs can be in design, development, research, outreach, or sales in public institutions 
and in industry. Examples include food engineers for food processing companies, biological engineers for biomedical companies, design engineers for 
agricultural equipment companies, and environmental engineers for government environmental agencies, industry, or engineering consulting firms. This 
curriculum, accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and technology (ABET), also provides 
adequate training for post-graduate work leading to advanced degrees in a variety of engineering fields. 

The Agricultural and Environmental Technology Curriculum provides graduates opportunities in the technical analysis, application and evaluation of 
agricultural production systems and their associated environmental systems. The curriculum's flexibility enables students to specialize technologically in 
agriculture, the environment, or business management. Careers include technical jobs in production agriculture, environmental systems, agribusiness sales 
and service, and agricultural extension agents. 

CURRICULA 

The curriculum provides an educational program for students which uniquely prepares them for dealing with engineering problems in the biological and 
agricultural areas. Flexibility in the program allows the student to choose electives which may lead to concentrations in the areas of (1) biological 
engineering, (2) agricultural engineering,(3) biomedical engineering, (4) bioprocess engineering, (5) environmental engineering, (6), or an emphasis area 
designed by the student and his/her advisor. Emphasis is placed on basic science and engineering courses such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, 
mechanics, biology, soils, and thermodynamics which provide a sound background for the application of engineering to biological problems. 

The program is jointly administered by The College of Engineering and The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in order to assure quality of basic 
training in both engineering and the life sciences. Undergraduate fieshmen entering this curriculum should enroll in the College of Engineering undesignated 
program and indicate BEU as their curriculum choice. After successfully completing the Engineering undesignated requirements, the student will enter the 
Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department in the BE curriculum. For the Biological Engineering program, refer to the College of Engineering 
section of this catalog. 

The Agricultural and Environmental Technology curriculum is intended to provide an educational program for students which uniquely prepares them for 
applying science, technology and business principles to efficiently manage agricultural and environmental systems. Flexibility within the program allows 
students to attain depth in science business, or environmental areas related to agricultural systems. Graduates are prepared to apply mechanical and 
information technology to production, agricultural and environmental issues or to other industries interfacing with natural resources or agriculture. They 
provide a critical link in the agricultural and environmental spectrum by interacting directly with both the production personnel as well as the designers and 
implementers of technological systems. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 
Degree earned: B.S. in Agricultural and Environmental Technology 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 1 CH 101 Chemistry -A Molecular Science 3 

BAE 121 Computer Applications in ALS 3 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 1 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Comp. and Reading 3 

MA 131 Calc. for Life &Mgt. Science A 3 MA 231 Calc. for Life & Mgt. Science B 3 

Humanities or Literature (2A)' 3 Humanities or Literature (2A)' 3 

Any 100-level PE in Fimess & Wellness 1 GC 120 Found, of Graphics (2B)' 3 

14 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BIO 125 General Biology 4 SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 3 BAE 201 Shop Processes & Mgmt. 3 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 1 MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math 3 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 PY 212 College Physics II 4 

MA 232 Comp. Math for Life & Mgt. Science 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

ARE 201 Intro. Agri.Res.Econ.(2C)' 3 15 

16 



75 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE (SSC) 323 Water Mgmt. 

BAE (SSC) 324 Elementary Surveying 

Agric. and Res. Economics Elective' 

Communication Elective' 

Group A, B, and C Elective^ 

Soc. Science Elective (2D)' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 BAE 3 1 1 Agric. Mach. & Power Units 

1 BAE 333 Processing Agric. Products 

3 ST (BUS) 350 Economics & Bus. Statistics 

3 Group A, B, and C Elective' 

3 

3 

16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 343 Agric. Electrification 

BAE 344 Circuits & Controls 

BAE 432 Agric. & Environ. Safety & Health 

Group A, B, and C Elective' 

Group A, B, and C Elective' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective (2F)' 



Spring Semester 

BAE 332 Animal Facilities & Env. Mgmt. 
BAE 442 Sys. Applic. Agric. & Environ. Issues 
Agric. and Res. Economics Elective' 
Group A, B, and C Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective (2E)' 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 



Credits 



4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 

123 



'Twenty-one hours of Humanities & Social Sciences Electives are required as follows: 

A.Two courses from the History Electives List and/or the Literature Electives List. 

B.GC 120 meets the Philosophy Electives, Religion Electives, and Visual and Performing Arts Electives Lists. 

C. ARE 201 Intro, to Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

D.One course from the Psychology Electives, Politics and Government Electives, Sociology Electives, Anthropology Electives, and Cultural Geography 

Electives Lists 

E.One course from Science, Technology and Social Sciences (Humanities & Social Science Perspective) List. 

F. One course from any of the above Lists plus the Economics Electives List and the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) List. 

Note: Of the five courses (in addition to ARE 201and GC 120) elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences one must focus on a non-English 

speaking culture. 

'Group A,B and C Electives can emphasize agricultural, environmental or business areas and be effectively used for a minor. 

'Choose from ARE 303, ARE 304, ARE 306, ARE 309, ARE 31 1, ARE 312, ARE 321 and ARE(EC) 336. 

'Choose from COM 1 10, ENG 331, ENG 332, and ENG 333. 

Other requirements: 

- Foreign language proficiency at the FL_ 102 level is required for graduation. 

- A major written paper in the junior and senior years (in BAE 323 in Jr. year, and in BAE 442 in the Sr. year). 

MINOR IN AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 

This minor is offered to students interested in the application of engineering technology analysis in agricultural and environmental systems that utilize 
machinery, agricultural structures, food and feed processing, soil and water and waste management, electrical power and controls, and agricultural safety and 
health technology. This minor allows majors in other areas to understand engineering technology for equipment, materials, resources, processes and 
facilities utilized in their major area of study, and be knowledgeable in the application of technology for managing environmental issues, 
impacts and monitoring. 

Objectives: 

1. apply engineering and information technology to production agriculture and environmental systems 

2. gain basic knowledge and understanding of engineering technology utilized in machine systems, environmental systems, materials, processes and 
structures 

3. increase ability to efficiently manage technology in agriculture production, environmental systems, and safety and health. 

At least one course must be selected from BAE 323, 332, or 432 (* on list) for awareness of environmental issues. Students may select from the following: 



COURSE NUMBER 


COURSE TITLE 


CREDITS 


BAE 201 


Shop Processes and Mgmt. 




BAE 311 


Agricultural Machinery and Power Units 




•BAE (SSC) 323 


Water Management 




BAE (SSC) 324 


Elementary Surveying 




♦BAE 332 


Animal Facilities and Environmental Mgmt. 




BAE 333 


Processing Agricultural Products 




BAE 343 


Agricultural Electrification 




BAE 344 


Circuits and Controls 




•BAE 432 


Agricultural and Environmental Safety and Health 




BAE 442 


Systems Approach to Agricultural and Environmental Issues 




BAE (CE) 578 


Agricultural Waste Mgmt. 





Students seeking this minor must consult with the undergraduate coordinator of the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering on a plan of 
work and must submit and Application for Minor form to the coordinator at any time prior to the pre-regisfration deadline for the student's final semester. 



76 



CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Bostian Hall, Room 2717 

Robert Horton, Interim Coordinator 

Professors: C. F. Lytic (Zoology), B. M. Parker (Entomology); Associate Professors: R. L. Beckmann Jr. (Botany), M. Niedzlek-Feaver (Zoology), B.C. 
Haning (Plant Pathology), J. E. Mickle (Botany); Laboratory Supervisor: P. M. Aune (Botony); Laboratory Manager: T. B. Johansson (Biological 
Sciences); Teaching Technician: W. P. Crumpler (Microbiology). 

The Biological Sciences constitute a rapidly developing field offering many challenging and rewarding opportunities for well-trained students. The 
Biological Sciences Interdepartmental Program ofTers a B.S. degree in Biological Sciences for students seeking comprehensive training in biology and the 
supporting sciences. 

Many graduates of this program continue further studies in graduate schools in such diverse fields as botany, zoology, marine biology, physiology, genetics, 
biochemistry, biotechnology, pharmacology, and microbiology. Others attend professional schools in medicine, optometry, and veterinary medicine as well 
as other health-related fields. 

The Biological Sciences curriculum provides a modem, flexible undergraduate program to prepare students for rewarding careers in research and teaching as 
well as in business, industry, research institutes and governmental agencies. A wide range of career opportunities are available in technical sales, 
manufacturing and quality control, environmental management, and other positions with pharmaceutical companies, food manufacturers, medical 
laboratories, public utilities, and other industries. 

Biological Sciences majors may elect a general program of study or the Nutrition concentration option. A joint program with the Department of Mathematics 
and Science Education leads to a double major and a teaching certificate. 

MINOR IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

The minor in Biological Sciences is open to all interested baccalaureate students with the exception of Zoology and Botany majors, but is intended primarily 
to enhance the programs of students whose major field is outside the Biological Sciences area. Students pursuing a minor in Biological Sciences will become 
familiar with fundamental principles of biology and gain a broad-based perspective of the biological sciences. The minor requires a minimum of 17 credit 
hours. The minor program is flexible so that students may take courses in areas of individual interest. 

CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 
Degree earned: B.S. in Biological Sciences 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology or 

BIO 181 Intro, to Biology 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 

MA 131 Calculus for Life & Mgmt ScienceA or 

MA 141 Calculus I 



dits Spring Semester Credits 

1 BIO 1 83 Intro, to Biology or 

Advised Elective 4 

4 CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

3 ENG 112 Comp. and Reading 3 

1 MA 132 Comp. Math for Life & Mgmt. Science 1 
3 MA 231 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Science B or 

MA 241 Calculus II 3-4 

3-4 Any 100-level PE in Fimess & Wellness' I- 

15-16 16-17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 121 Computer Applications in ALS or 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers and Uses or 

MA 242 Calculus III or 

ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 

BO 200 Plant Life or 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 

Physical Education Elective' 



3-4 

4 
4 
3 
I 
15-16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENT 425 General Entomology or 

ZO 150 Animal Diversity or 

ZO 250 Animal Anatomy & Physiology 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 

Free Electives 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 360 Intro, to Ecology and 

BO 365 Ecology Lab or 

GN41I Prin. of Genetics" 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. and Science I or 

PY21I College Physics I 

Humanities/Social Science. Electives' 

Writing/Speaking Elective' 



'ts Spring Semester 

ALS 498 Honors Research Teach.' or 

BIO 492 External Learning Experience or 
4 BIO 493 Special Problems in Bio. Science 

BCH 45 1 Intro, to Biochem. 
4 GN 4 1 1 Prin. Genetics or 

6 ZO Evolution, Behavior and Ecology' 

3 GN 4 1 2 Elementary Genetics Lab 

17 PY 208 Physics for Engr. and Science II or 

PY 212 College Physics II 



Credits 



11 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 490 Senior Seminar 

Humanities/Social Science. Electives^ 

Physiology Elective' 

Restricted Electives^ 



Credits 
I 
9 

3-4 

4 

17-18 



Spring Semester 

MB 351 General Microbiology 

MB 3S2 Gen. Microbiology Lab 

Free Electives 

Restricted Electives' 



Credits 

3 
1 



0-3 
12-15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



128 



Foreign language proficiency at the FL_ 102 level is required for graduation. 



'Two semesters hours of physical education (PE) credit are required for graduation. This requirement includes one 100-level course in Fitness and Wellness. 
^The Humanities and Social Sciences requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A.Two courses from the History and Literature electives lists, (may be either 2 History courses, 2 literature courses, or 1 history and 1 literature course) 
B.One course from the Philosophy, Religion or Visual and Performing Arts Electives lists 

C.Two courses from two of the following electives lists: Psychology; Economics; Politics and Government; Sociology; Anthropology; and Cultural 
Geography .( courses must be selected from different lists.) 

D.One course from any of the above-named lists or from the Advanced Humanities and Social Sciences lists. 

E.One course from Science, Technology and Society: Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective List ( not Science and Technology Perspectives List). 
F.One of the courses elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirementmust focus on a non- 
English speaking culture. This course may come from the Foreign Language Elective List. 

Note: These lists of electives - The General Education Requirements - are available in the Biological Sciences office and on the World Wide Web at 
http://www2.nc9u.edu/ncsu/provost/info/academic_programs/ger/index.html 

'Students may elect BO 360 General Ecology (3 hrs. ) plus BO 365 Ecology Lab (1 hr,.) or ZO 260 Evolution, Behavior and Ecology (4 hrs.) All students 
are required to take GN 411 Principles of Genetics. 

*The Writing and Speaking Elective requirement includes one course from the Advanced Writing Electives list, the Communication/Speech Electives list, or 
the Foreign Languages Elective list. 

'Honors students electing ALS 498H typically follow this course with ALS 499H. 

'Students may elect BO 421 Plant Physiology (4 hrs.)^r ZO 421 Prin. of Physiology ( 3 hrs.)_oBO (ZO) 414 Cell Biology ( 3 hrs.), orBO 480 Introduction 
to Plant Biotechnology (3 hrs.) or PO 405 Avian Physiology (4 hrs.) Students selecting ZO 421, BO (ZO) 414 or BO 480 arae encouraged to enroll in either 
ZO 375 Developmental Anatomy and Histology Lab I, or ZO 480 Laboratory Techniques in Cellular Biology or BCH 452 Introductory Biochemistry 
Laboratory in order to gain laboratory experience. 
'Restricted Electives must be chosen from Groups A, B ,C or D in the CALS section of the Undergraduate Catalog. 



NUTRITION CONCENTRATION 

Degree earned: B.S. in Biological Sciences 

The Nutrition concentration follows the general curricular requirements for the biological sciences program, except that students must take four courses in 

nutrition: FS 400, NTR 415, NTR 490, and NTR 5 1 6. 

MINOR IN NUTRITION 

Schaub Hall, Room 281 
Phone: (919)515-2968 

The minor in Nutrition will provide knowledge of the principles of nutrition that are needed to formulate balanced diets and to evaluate information and 
policies concerning foods and dietary practices. Students may select courses to emphasize human or animal nutrition or a combination of these. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

Gardner Hall, Room 2214 
Phone: (919)515-2727 



www.caIs.ncsu.edu/botany 



E. Davies, Head 

CO. Van Dyke, Undergraduate Coordinator 

N.S. Allen, Director of Graduate Programs 

University Research Professor: W.F. Thompson; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: R.L. Beckmann, C.G. Van Dyke; Professors: N.S. 
Allen, U. Blum, W.F. Boss, R.S. Boston, J.M. Burkholder, W.S. Chilton, R.C. Fites, HE. Pattee (USDA), J.F. Thomas, C.G. Van Dyke, T.R.Wentworth; 
Professors Emeriti: C.E. Anderson, R.J. Downs, J.W. Hardin, WW. Heck (USDA), R.L. Mott, G.R.Noggle, E.D.Seneca, J.R.Troyer; Associate Professors: 
R.L.Beckmann, J.E.Mickle, D.Robertson, J.M.Stucky; Teaching Technician: D.S.Wright, Associate Members of the Faculty: H.V.Amerson (Forestry), 
K.O.Burkey (USDA), MM. Goodman (Crop Science, Statistics, Genetics), S.C. Huber (USDA), M.D. Purugganan (Genetics), T.W. Rufty Jr. (Crop 
Science), EC. Sisler (Biochemistry), E.A. Wheeler (Wood and Paper Science), R.W. Whetten (Forestry); Adjunct Associate Professor: C.S. Brown, O.K. 
Muday. 

The instructional program provides classroom, laboratory, and field experience in the major areas of plant science. Undergraduates majoring in botany are 
given a broad background in the humanities and physical sciences and are encouraged to participate in independent study in the senior year. Majors, as pre- 
professionals in the plant sciences, are prepared for advanced study in botany and other biological fields, as well as in the applied plant sciences such as 
horticulture, crop science, plant pathology, resource management and environmental biology. 



78 



OPPORTUNITIES 

The undergraduate degree is an excellent pre-professional degree in the plant sciences. Many majors continue with graduate studies; see list of graduate 
degrees. After obtaining a graduate degree, the undergraduate major will be qualified for teaching positions in community and junior colleges, colleges and 
universities, for research positions in federal and state government laboratories and in private industry. Research technician positions in many life science 
areas in governmental and industrial laboratories are also career possibilities. The field of biotechnology provides additional technical opportunities. Field 
botanists and naturalists And employment in state and national park systems and nature interpretation programs. 

CURRICULUM 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in botany is offered under the science curriculum of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. See the 
freshman year program listed. See also other basic requirements listed. The Bachelor of Science degree with double concentration-one in economics, 
English, history, philosophy or political science, and the other in botany-is available in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. For details, refer to 
the appropriate section under the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. 

CURRICULUM IN BOTANY 
Degree earned: B.S. in Botany 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BO 101 Orientation to Botany 

BIO 181 Introduction to Biology I 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Restricted Elective^ 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness^ 



Credits 
1 
I 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

BO 102 Introduction to Research 

BAE 121 Computer Applications in ALS or 

CSC 200 Intro, to Comp. & Use' 

BIO 183 Introduction to Biology II 

ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading 

MA 1 3 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 



Credits 
I 

3 
4 
3 
3 
14 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

BO 250 Plant Biology' 

English, Modem Language', or Comm. 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Restricted Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CH201Chemistry- A Quantitative Science 
I CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

4 ST 3 1 1 Intro, to Statistics 
3 BO Restricted Course 

3 Restricted Elecive' 

3 Free Elective 
17 



Credits 
3 
I 
3 
4 
3 

15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Research 

PY211 College Physics I 

Restricted Course' 

Free Elective 



Credits 

4 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

PY 212 College Physics II 

BO Restricted Course' 

Restricted Elective' 

Free Elective' 

Free Elective" 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

GN 411 Prin. of Genetics 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 

BO Restricted Course' 

BO Restricted Course' 

Restricted Elective' 



Credits 
4 
I 
3 
4 
4 
16 



Spring Semester 

BO 495 Special Topics in Botany 

BO Restricted Course' 

Restricted Course' 

Free Elective' 

Free Elective' 



Credits 
2 
3 
3 
3 
5 
16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128 

'At least one course must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'Must include one course from HI 321, HI 322, or HI 481; one additional course or equiv. in study of history &/or literature (see GER list); two courses or 

equivalent from different content areas in study of psychology, economics, politics & government, sociology, anthropology, & cultural geography (see 

appropriate list), it is recommended that PHI 340 be taken here or as a free elective; one course from Science, Technology, & Society (Humanities/Social 

Science Perspective) List. 

'BAE 121 (focus on IBM compatible systems), CSC 200 (focus on Macintosh systems). 

'All Physical Education may be taken as credit only. Two (2) hours of PE may be used as free electives. 

'Must select 18 hrs from BO 360/365, 400, 403, 413, 421, 414, or 480. A 2.000 GPA is required in all Botany courses. 

'Foreign language proficiency at the FL_ 102 level required for graduation. 

'Select 12 hours from MB 351, ZO 201. SSC 200 or MEA lOl/l 10. BCH 451/452, CH 223, PP 315, CH 315, ENT 425. 

'Any course fulfills this requirement; 500 level courses may be taken with permission of the instructor (Graduate credit may be obtained if student qualifies 

with GPA =/or 3.200 and course is not part of requirements to fulfill the B.S. degree). 



79 



DEPARTMENT OF CROP SCIENCE 

Williams Hall, Room 2205 
Phone: (919)515-2647 

H.T. Stalker, Interim Head 
J. F. Spears, Department Extension Leader 
R. P. Patterson, Undergraduate Coordinator 
R. C. Rufty, Director of Graduate Programs 

Distinguished University Professor: M. M. Goodman; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: R. P. Patterson; William Neal Reynolds Professors: 
M. M. Goodman, E. A. Wemsman; Philip Morris Professor: G. F. Peedin; Professors: J. R. Anderson, D. T. Bowman, A. H. Bruneau, J. C. Bums (USDA), 
J. W. Burton (USDA), B. E. Caldwell, T E. Carter Jr. (USDA), H. D. Coble, F. T. Corbin, E. J. Dunphy, E. L. Fiscus (USDA), D. S. Fisher (USDA), J. T. 
Green Jr., S. C. Huber (USDA), R. E. Jarrett, D. A. Knauft, H. M. Linlcer, R. C. Long, J. E. Miller (USDA), J. P. Mueller, J. P. Murphy, C. H. Peacock, R. C. 
Rufty, W. D. Smith, H. T. Stalker, J. B. Weber, W. W. Weeks, G. G. Wilkerson, R. F. Wilson (USDA), J. C. Wynne, A. C. York; Adjunct Professors: J. R. 
Evans, K. D. Getsinger, D. G. Oblinger, D. T. Patterson, J. A. Ryals, G. M. Werner, Professors Emeriti: R. R. Bennett, C. T. Blake, C. A. Brim, D. S. 
Chamblee, J. F. Chaplin, W. K. Collins, W. A. Cope, S. H. Dobson, D. A. Emery, W. T. Fike, D. U. Gerstel, W. B. Gilbert, W. C. Gregory, H. D. Gross, G. 
R. Gwynn, P. H. Harvey, S. N. Hawks, G. L. Jones, G. C. Klingman, J. A. Lee, W. H. Lewis, R. L. Lovvom, R. P. Moore, D. E. Moreland, A. Perry, L. L. 
Phillips, J. C. Rice, H. Seltman, G. A. Sullivan, D. L. Thompson, D. H. Timothy, J. A. Weybrew, A. D. Worsham; Associate Professors: D. C. Bowman, K. 
O. Burkey (USDA), D. A. Danehower, R. E. Dewey, T. G. Isleib, S. H. Kay, R. D. Keys, P. Kwanyuen (USDA), D. P. Livingston (USDA), P. H. Sisco 
(USDA), V. A. Sisson, J. F. Spears, A. K, Weissinger, R. Wells, J. Wilcot; Associate Professors Emeriti: R. L. Davis, W. G. Toomey; Assistant Professors: 
K. L. Edmisten, G. P. Fenner, R. W. Heiniger, D. Jordan, J. M. Luginbuhl, R. Qu, P. R. Weisz; Adjunct Assistant Professor: M. Fraser; Extension 
Specialists: D. W. Daniel, C. M. Sasscer; Crop Science Specialists: S. C. Bennett, C. E. Collins, G. E. Martin; Associate Members of Faculty: C. W. Stuber 
(Genetics), W. F. Thomson, C. T. Young (Food Science); Visiting Professor: T. W. Rufty Jr.. 

Crop Scientists seek to improve the productivity, profitability, and quality of our major food, feed, fiber, and specialty crops; enhance the quality of turf and 
vegetative cover, enhance our environment, and improve the nutfition and economic health of our world. The Crop Science four-year undergraduate program 
is offered within the Agronomy curriculum and is administered jointly by the Crop Science and Soil Science Departments. Students may earn a Bachelor of 
Science degree in the technology curriculum with a major in Agronomy. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Agronomy major graduates find employment as consultants, extension agents, farm managers, golf course superintendents, landscape specialists, research 
scientists, seed production specialists, sod production specialists, soil survey specialists, soil conservationists, technical sales representatives, and waste 
management specialists. Graduate work can lead to careers in plant breeding, biotechnology, crop physiology and chemistry, and crop management systems. 
The Agronomy Curriculum can also be found in this catalog under College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. (For Crop Science graduate programs, see the 
Graduate Catalog.) 

CURRICULA 

Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree in the technology curriculum with a major in Agronomy. The Agronomy option is administered jointly by 
the Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science. 

MINOR IN CROP SCIENCE 

Open to any undergraduate degree student interested in gaining knowledge of the development, productivity and sustainability of crop management systems, 
genetic improvement and pest management strategies, and interaction of crops with their physical and biotic environment.lt is intended to complement 
other curricula that are related to crop-environment and agroecological studies. An appreciation of agronomic approaches which lead to a more efficient use 
of crop production inputs and to a less invasive impact on the environment, is emphasized. It is not intended to prepare students for a professional career in 
Crop Science, and additional courses are recommended for students who plan graduate work in this discipline. 

CURRICULUM IN DAIRY SCIENCE 

(See Animal Science) 

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/ 

Gardner Hall, Room 2301 
Phone: (919)515-2746 

J. D. Harper, Head 

J. R. Meyer, Undergraduate Coordinator 

W. M. Brooks, Director of Graduate Programs 

P. S. Southern, Department Extension Leader 

Teaching, Research and Extension Faculty 

Philip Morris Professor: J.W. Van Duyn; William Neal Reynolds Professors: F.L. Gould, G.G. Kennedy; Blanton J. Whitmire Professor: C. Schal; 
Professors: J.T. Ambrose, C.S. Apperson, J.S. Bacheler, JR. Baker, JR. Bradley Jr., R.L. Brandenburg, W.M. Brooks, L.L. Deitz, F.P. Hain, J.D. Harper, R. 
J. Kuhr, JR. Meyer, B.M. Parker, R.M. Roe, K.A. Sorensen, PS. Southern, RE. Stinner, J.F. Walgenbach; Adjunct Professors: D.M. Jackson, P.M. Marsh, 
D.E. Sonenshine; Professors Emeriti: R.C. Axtell, W.V. Campbell, M.H. Farrier, K.L. Knight, H.B. Moore, Jr., H.H. Neunzig, R.L. Rabb, R.L. Robertson, 
C.F. Smith, C.G. Wright; Associate Professors: M.E. Barbercheck; Adjunct Associate Professors: D.A. Herbert, C. Nalepa; Associate Professor Emeritus: 
R.C. Hillmann; Assistant Professors: D.B. Orr, C.E. Sorenson, E.L. Vargo, D. W. Watson, B.M. Wiegmann; Adjunct Assistant Professors: DM. Thompson, 
M.D. Tomalski; Visiting Assistant Professors: D.W. Keever, M.G. Waldvogel; Extension Specialists: SB. Bambara. D.L. Stephan, S.M. Stringham, S.J. 
Toth, Jr., M.G. Waldvogel; Associate Members of the Department: Professors: R.B. Leidy (Toxicology), H.M. Linker (Crop Science); Assistant Professors: 
W.G. Buhler (Horticulture), D.J. Robison (Forestry), R. Rose (Toxicology). 

Undergraduate instruction in entomology provides introductory and advanced courses in the basic science of entomology and the management of beneficial 
and pest insects. 200- and 400-level courses fulfill General Education Requirements in Natural Sciences or Science and Technology and serve students 
majoring in biological sciences, agronomy, botany, horticultural science, agricultural education, crop science, and forestry. They also provide fundamentaJ 
training for graduate study in entomology (see the Graduate Catalog). 

80 



OPPORTUNITIES 

For graduates with advanced degrees in entomology, opportunities include research, teaching, and extension positions in colleges and universities; research, 
development, production, control, and sales positions in private industries; consultative positions in pest management; curatorial positions in museums; and 
research and regulatory positions with state and federal agencies. 

MINOR IN ENTOMOLOGY 

The Department of Entomology offers an undergraduate minor available to all baccalaureate degree students at North Carolina State University. The minor 
is especially appropriate for (but not limited to) students interested in biological or agricultural sciences, veterinary medicine, or other health sciences. A 
basic knowledge of insect biology may also be useful to students seeking careers in government, industry, or education. The minor consists of a minimum of 
15 credit hours, including one core course (ENT 425). The remaining 12 hours be selected from a group of restricted electives. 

CURRICULA IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

( Also see Interdisciplinary Programs or Physical Mathematical Sciences) 

Nelson Hall, Room 233E, Williams Hall, Room 2321, and North Gardner Hall, Room 3216 

A. W. Oltmans, Coordinator. Economic Policy Concentration, Nelson Hall, Room 233E 

H. J. KJeiss, Coordinator, Environmental Soil Science Concentration, Williams Hall, Room 2321 

S. C. Mozley, Coordinator. Ecology Concentration, Gardner Hall, Room 2104 

Environmental sciences in the broadest sense are concerned with the development of basic knowledge about the world's environments and the use of this 
knowledge to create new and more efficient ways to maintain or enhance the environment for society's benefit. Given the complexity of environmental 
processes and the many ways in which humans interact with natural environments, a multidisciplinary systems approach is essential for understanding 
changes in natural environments. Society's future prospects maintaining and improving our environment depends on advances in economics, other social 
science and humanities and the use of these advances to develop and maintain effective economic, political and social structures. 

Public concern about environmental issues and the resource costs for protecting our environment are increasing. Protecting and improving our environment 
involves knowledge and systematic problem-solving skills will be essential for environmental scientists. Ecologists and other environmental scientists must 
be conversant with economics, other social sciences, and humanities, while environmental economists and political scientists must be conversant with 
physical and biological sciences. The explosive growth of knowledge requires that all environmental scientists be competent in the use of mathematical 
models and statistics. North Carolina State University's environmental science degree program provides sound training in each of these areas. Successful 
completion of this diverse and challenging program requires a sound academic background and hard work. 

To accommodate the complexity and breadth of environmental sciences, the Bachelor of Science degree in environmental science is a campus-wide 
program involving two colleges and five departments that administer six concentrations. A common core of 89 hours provides a balanced foundation in 
communication, humanities social sciences, mathematics and the natural sciences. The core requirements include a freshman introductory environmental 
science course and a capstone course for seniors in which teams of students from the various concentrations work together on environmental problems from 
ecological, physical and economic perspectives. 

Three departments within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences offer environmental sciences concentration that allow students to specialize in areas 
within environmental science: Ecology, Economics Policy and Environmental Soil Science. For information on other concentrations, see Marine, Earth and 
Atmospheric Sciences and Statistics. 

CURRICULUM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, ECONOMIC POLICY CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Environmental Sciences 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environment 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Social Science Elective^ ' 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 CFR 134 Computers in Natural Resources 

I CSC 1 1 2 Intro, to Computing - FORTRAN or 

3 CSC 1 1 4 Intro, to Computing - C++ 

4 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 
3 ES 100 Intro, to Environ. Sci' 

IS MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

Any 100-level in PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits 
I 

3 
3 
3 
4 
I 
15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics or 

EC 201 Intro, to Economics I 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science and 

CH 102 Chemistry Lab 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

ST 301 Statistical Methods I 

Physical Education Elective' 



Spring Semester 

ARE (EC) 336 Intro. Res. & Environ. Economics 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science and 

CH 202 Chemistry Lab 

ST 302 Statistical Methods II 

Communication Elective' 

History or Literature Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
16 



81 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE (EC) 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 

BO 200 Plant Life or 

ZO 150 Intro, to Animal Kingdom 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Science I 

ST 430 Intro to Regression Analysis 

Histroy or Literature Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Technology or 
ENG 332 Comm. for Bus. & Mgmt or 

4 ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Research 
4 PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sciencell 

3 ST 431 Intro, to Exper. Design or 

3 ST 432 Intro, to Survey Sampling 

17 Natural Sciences Elective' 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE (EC) 436 Environ. Economics 

EC 410 Public Finance 

PS 320 U. S. Environ. Law & Politics or 

PS 336 Global Environ. Politics 

Natural Sciences Elective' 

Phil., Relig., Vis/Perf. Arts Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 

3 
4 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

EC 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics 
EC 400 Environ. Sciences Project Course' 
ST 445 Stat. Computing & Data Mgmt. 
Restricted Elective^ 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
12 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 120 



Note; a minimum grade of C in English 1 1 1 and ENG 1 12, a grade point average of 2.0 in all ACC, BUS, EC and ECG courses attempted, and foreign 

language proficiency at the FL_1 02 level are required to be eligible for graduation. ARE(EC) 336 fulfills the requirement for a Science, Technology and 

Society (Humanities and Social Science Perspective) elective. 

'Four credit hours of PE (including any 100-level PE) are required for graduation. 

'Select from Psychology, Politics & Government, Sociology, Anthropology, and Cultural Geography Electives lists. 

'One of these courses must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'New courses to be implemented. 

'Select from COM 1 1 0, COM 112, COM 1 46 or COM 211. 

'Select two of the following four courses and their co-requisite laboratories: BO 360/BO365; MEA 101; MEA 130/MEA 135; MEA 200/MEA 210. 

'Select from ARE 433, EC 435, ECG 5 1 5, ECG 533, ECG 540, or ECG 55 1. 

CURRICULUM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, SOIL SCIENCE CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Environmental Sciences 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environment 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 

MEA 110 Geology I Lab 

Any 100-level in PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

1 CH 1 1 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

3 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

4 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading' 

3 ES 100 Intro, to Environ. Science 

I MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

I Physical Education Elective' 
17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics or 

EC 201 Intro, to Economics I 

BO 200 Plant Life 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

Physical Education Elective' 



Spring Semester 

SSC 341 Intro, to Statistics 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. and Science I 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

History/ Literature Elective' 

Physical Education Elective' 



Credits 
3 
4 
4 
3 
1 
IS 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 360 Intro, to Ecology 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 

MEA 585 Hydrogeology or 

Advised Elective 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Science II 

Comm./Speech Elective'' 



Credits 
3 
1 



Spring Semester 

ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Technology or 

ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Research 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interp. & Photogram. or 

NR 300 Natural Resource Measurement or 

MEA Intro, to Geologic Materials 

MB 35 1 Microbiology 

SSC 361 Role of Soils in Environ. Mgmt. 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 



3-4 
4 
3 
4 
17-18 



82 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE (EC) 336 Env. Economics 

BAE (SSC) 323 Water Mgmt or 

FOR 401 Watershed and Welands Hydrology 

BAE (CE) 578 Agricultural Waste Mgmt. or 

CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry or 

FOR (MDS) 584 Pract. of Envi. Impact Assess. 

SSC 461 Soil Physical Properties & Plant Grth. 

History/Literature Elective' 



3-4 

3 

3 

15-17 



Spring Semester 

BAE 471 Land Res. Env. Engr. or 

SSC 562 Env. Applications of Soil Science 

ES 400 Environ. Sciences Project' or 

MEA 400 Earth Systems Modeling or 

NR 400 Natural Resource Management 

PS 320 U.S. Environ. Politics or 

PS 336 Global Environ. Politics 

Phil., Relig., Vis/Perf. Arts Elective' 

Social Science Elective 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 127 

'Grade of C or better required in ENG 1 1 1 and ENG 112. 

^Two credit hours of PE (including any 100-level Fitness & Wellness) are required for graduation. 

'The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. Two courses from the History and Literature Electives Lists. 

B. One course from the Philosophy, Religion, or Visual and Performing Arts Electives Lists. 

C. One course from the Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology, or Cultural Geography Elective Lists. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) Electives List. 

E. One course among those elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and 
Society (Humanities and Social Science Perspective) elective list If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course 
from this list must be taken as a Free Elective. 

*The Writing and Speaking Elective requirement Includes one course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives 

List. 

Note: Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level is required for graduation. 

PROGRAM IN FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES 

Turner House, 1 10 Brooks Avenue 

R. L. Noble, Undergraduate Coordinator 

The Departments of Zoology and Forestry jointly administer the program in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences. Undergraduate education emphasizes 
ecological principles and their application to research problems and natural resource management needs. Majors are well prepared for graduate work and 
entry-level professional positions. 

CURRICULUM IN FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES, CONCENTRATION IN FISHERIES SCIENCE 
Degree earned: B.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences 

Note: This is suggested order of courses. As long as prerequisites are observed, and specific semester restrictions are observed (see footnotes), courses 
may be taken in other semesters. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology or 

ZO 150 Animal Diversity 

MA 131 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Sci. A 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science and 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

4 COM 1 1 Publ ic Speaking 

3 ENG 1 1 2 Comp. & Reading 

3 ZO 150 Animal Diversity or 

3 ZO 1 60 Cell & Development' 

1 Physical Education Elective 
15 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 

4 
1 
15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry 

FW (FOR,ZO) 221 Conserv. Natural Resources 

PY 131 Conceptual Physics or 

PY211 College Physics I 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 ARE 201 Intro. Agric. Res. Economics or 

3 EC 205 Fundamentals of Econ. 
BO 200 Plant Life 

4 ZO 260 Evol., Behav. & Ecol. or 
3 BO 360 Intro, to Ecology and 
14 BO 365 Ecology Lab 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 



83 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Quantitative Science Elective' 
FW(ZO) 420 Fisheries Science 
W(ZO) 423 Intro. Fish. Sci. Lab. 
PS 201 Intro, to American Govt. 
ST 311 Intro, to Statistics. 
Advised Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 

Advised Elective' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 

Restricted Elective* 

Zoology Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SUMMER TRAINING PROGRAM 



FW (FOR) 310 Fisheries & Wildlife Inventory & Mgmt 



Fall Semester 

ENG 333 Comm. for Sci. & Research 
FW (ZO) 353 Wildlife Mgmt. 
Z0 419 Limnology 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 
Physical Science Elective* 



SENIOR YEAR 


Credits 


Spring Semester 


3 


FW (ZO) 430 Fish. Wildlife Admin. 


3 


Advised Elective' 


4 


Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 


3 


Z0 441 Biology of Fishes 


4 


ZO 442 Biology of Fishes Lab 


17 





Credits 
3 
5 
3 
3 
1 
15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 



128 



General Note: Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_ 102 level is required for graduation. 

'Two semesters of physical education (PE) are required for graduation, including one 100-level course in Fitness & Wellness. PE courses can be taken on 
an s/u basis. 

'Among the 1 5 hours of elective Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS), the student must take one history ,_onditerature, one course in philosophy, religion 
or visual/performing arts, and two additional courses from any approved HSS lists. One of these five courses must come from the approved list of courses on 
Non-English Speaking Cultures. 

'Take ZO 150 if BIO 125 was taken previously; take ZO 160 if ZO 150 was taken previously. 
'Choose from CSC 200, MA 2 14 or MA 23 1 

'Total of 1 1 credits of advised electives applicable to academic and career goals are to be chosen in consultation with your advisor. Must be 200 level or 
higher. See list of approved courses below. 

'Choose from FW(FOR) 404, FW(FOR) 485, FW(ZO) 515, FW(ZO) 553, FW(ZO) 586 or BO 403. 
'Choose from ZO 212, ZO 410 or ZO 402 and ZO 403. 
'Choose from soil science, marine/earth/atmospheric sciences, or from advanced courses in physics, chemistry, mathematics or computer science. 



Advised Electives, Fisheries Concenfration (SFF) 

BAE(SSC) 323 Water Management 3(2-2)F 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 4(3-3)F 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 4(2 -4)S 

BO(MB) 574 Phycology 3(1-4)S Alt. yrs 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation 3(2-3)F 

FOR 401 Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management 4(3-3)F 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Policy and Mgmt. 3(3-0)F 

FOR(MDS) 584 Environmental Impact Assessment 4(0-8)F Alt. yrs. 

FW(FOR) 404 Forest Wildlife Management 3(3-0)S 

FW (FOR)485 Natural Resources Advocacy 3(2-3)S 

FW(ZO) 515 Fish Physiology 3(2-3)F Alt. yrs. 

FW(ZO) 553 Principles of Wildlife Science 3(2-3)F 

FW(ZO) 586 Aquaculture I 3(3-0)F 



FW(ZO) 587 Aquaculture I Lab 1(0-3)F Alt. yrs. 

MB 351 General Microbiology 4(3-3 )F,S 

MEA(ZO) 220 Marine Biology 3(3-0)S 

MEA(ZO) 520 Principles of Biological Oceanography 3(3-0)S 

NTR(ANS.FS) 301 Infro.Modem Nutrition 3(3-0)F,S 

NTR(ANS,PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition 3(3-0)F 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4(3-3)F,S 

ZO 212 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 4(4-0)S 

ZO 3 1 5 General Parasitology 3(2-3)S 

ZO 402 Invertebrate Zoology 2(2-0)S Alt. yrs. 

ZO 410 Animal Behavior 3(3-0)F 

ZO 460 Aquatic Natural History Lab 2(0-6)S 

ZO 593 Aquatic Ecology Seminar 1-3, F,S 



•BAE 121Computer Applications in ALS 3(1-4)F,S 

*CSC 200 Intro, to Computers 3(2-2)F,S 

*For students who frilfilled quantitative requirement with a non-computer course. 



CURRICULUM IN FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES, CONCENTRATION IN WILDLIFE SCIENCE 

Degree earned: B.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences 

Note: This is a suggested order of courses. As long as prerequisites are observed, and specific semester restrictions are observed (see footnotes), courses 
may be taken in other semesters. 



84 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology or 

ZO 150 Animal Diversity 

MA 131 Calculus for Life & Management Science A 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 



Credits 
1 



Spring Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science and 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

COM 110 Public Speaking 

ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 

ZO 150 Animal Diversity or 

ZO 160 Cell & Development' 

Physical Education Elective 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry 

FW (FOR,ZO) 221 Conserv. Natural Resources 

PY 131 Conceptual Physics or 

PY 211 College Physics I 

Humanities/Social Science Elective" 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 ARE 201 Intro. Agric. Res. Economics or 

3 EC 205 Fundamentals of Economics 
BO 200 Plant Life 

4 ZO 260 Evol., Behav. & Ecol. or 
3 BO 360 Intro, to Ecology and 
14 BO 365 Ecology Lab 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Quantitative Science Eleaive' 
FW (ZO) 353 Wildlife Mgmt. 
PS 20 1 Intro, to American Govt. 
ST 3 1 1 Intro, to Statistics. 
Advised Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

FW (FOR) 404 Forest Wildlife Mgmt. 
GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 
Advised Elective' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective" 
Zoology Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SUMMER TRAINING PROGRAM 



FW (FOR) 310 Fisheries & Wildlife Inventory & Mgmt. 



Fall Semester 

ENG 333 Comm. for Sci. & Research 
FW (ZO) 420 Fisheries Science 
Advised Elective' 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Electives" 
Restricted Elective' 



SENIOR YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 






BO 403 Systematic 


Botany 




FW (ZO) 430 Fish. 


Wildlife Admin. 




Advised Elective' 






Humanities/Soc.Sci 


. Elective" 




Physical Science Elective' 


IS 







Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 
17 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



127 



General Note: Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_ 102 level is required for graduation. 

'Two semesters of physical education (PE) are required for graduation, including one 100-level course in Fitness & Wellness. PE courses can be taken on an 

s/u basis. 

"Among the 15 hours of elective Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS), you must take one history, one literature, one course in philosophy, religion or 

visual/performing arts, and two additional courses from any approved HSS lists. One of these five courses must come from the approved list of courses on 

non-English Speaking Cultures. 

'Take ZO 150 if BIO 125 was taken previously; take ZO 160 if ZO 150 was taken previously. 

'Choose from BAE 121, CSC 200, FOR(WPS) 273, MA 214 or MA 231 

'Total of 12 credits of advised electives applicable to academic and career goals are to be chosen in consultation with your advisor. Must be 200 level or 

higher. See list of approved courses below. 

'Choose from ZO 212, ZO 410 or ZO 402 and ZO 403. 

'Choose from FW(FOR) 485, FW(ZO) 553, ZO 419 or ZO 441 . 

'Choose from soil science, marine/earth/atmospheric sciences, or from advanced courses in physics, chemistry, mathematics or computer science. 



8S 



Advised Electives, Wildlife Sciences Concentration (SFW) 

FOR 212 Dendrology 4(2-4)F 

FOR 252 Forest Science 3(2-3)S 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation 3(2-3)F 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Policy and Management 3(3-0)F 

FOR 584 Environmental Impact Assessment 4(0-8)F 

FW 485 Natural Resources Advocacy 3(2-3)S 

FW(ZO) 554 Wildlife Field Studies 3(2-3)S Alt. yrs. 

FW(FOR) 594 Seminar in Wildlife Management 1(1-0)S Alt. yrs. 

MB 351 General Microbiology 4(3-3)F,S 

NTR(ANS,FS) 301 Intro.Modem Nutrition 3(3-0)F,S 

PO 410 Production and Mgmt. Game Birds in Confinement 3(2-3)S 

PRT 442 Recreation and Park Interpretive Services 3(2-3)F 



PS 307 Intro.Criminal Law in the United States 3(3-0)F,S 

PS 31 1 Criminal Justice Policy Process 3(3-0)F,S 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4(3-3)F,S 

ZO 212 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 4(4-0)S 

ZO 303 Vertebrate Zoology 4(3-3)F,S 

ZO 402 Invertebrate Zoology 2(2-0)S 

ZO410 Animal Behavior 3(3-0)F 

ZO 419 Limnology 4(3-3)F 

ZO 441 Biology of Fishes 3(3-0)F 

ZO 442 Biology of Fishes Lab 1(0-3)F 

ZO 501 Ornithology 3(2-3)S Alt. yrs. 

ZO 544 Mammalogy 4(3-3)F 



•BAE 121 Computer Application in ALS 3(1-4)F,S 

•CSC 200 Intro, to Computers 3(2-2)F,S 

•For students who fulfilled quantitative requirement with a non-computer course. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOOD SCIENCE 

Schaub Hall, Room 100 
Phone: (919)515-2951 

K. R. Swartzel, Head 

D. R. Ward, Associate Department Head and Department Extension Leader 

P. M. Foegeding, Undergraduate Teaching Coordinator 

D. K. Larick, Graduate Administrator 

William Neal Reynolds Professors: T. R. Klaenhammer, H. E. Swaisgood, K. R. Swartzel; Professors: D. E. Carroll Jr., G. L. Catignani Jr., H. P. Fleming 
(USDA), E. A. Foegeding, D. D. Hamann, A. P. Hansen, T. C. Lanier,D.K. Larick, R. F. McFeeters (USDA), J. L. Oblinger, D. H. Pilkington, J. E. Rushing, 
T. H. Sanders (USDA), B. W. Sheldon, S. J. Schwartz, L. G. Turner, W. M. Walter Jr. (USDA), C. T. Young, Adjunct Professors: J. P. Adams, N. B. Webb, 
Professors Emerti: L. W. Aurand, H. R. Ball, T. A. Bell Jr., T. N. Blumer, R.E. Carawan, J. A. Christian, E. S. Cofer, H. B. Craig, M. E. Gregory, M. W. 
Hoover, I. D. Jones, V. A. Jones, N. C. Miller Jr., A. E. Purcell, W. M. Roberts, M. L. Speck, F. R. Tarver Jr., F. B. Thomas, F. G. Warren; Associate 
Professors: J. C. Allen, L. C. Boyd, P.A. Curtis, D. K. Larick; Assistant Professors: B. K. Farkas, D. P. Green, L. Jaykus, Associate Members of Faculty: B. 
K. Garland 

The Department of Food Science provides undergraduate and graduate programs for the application and integration of chemistry, biology, and engineering to 
the development, processing, packaging, quality control, distribution and utilization of safe and nutritious foods. The Food Science B.S. is compatible with 
pre-professional school curricula; many students elect to double major in Food Science with Biochemistry, Chemical Engineering, Poultry Science or other 
curricula. Minors in a variety of areas are also encouraged. The department maintains modem, fully-equipped laboratories for teaching and research in the 
disciplines of food microbiology, food chemistry /biochemistry, food engineering, and nutrition; and the product areas of dairy, fruit, meats, poultry, seafood 
and vegetable products. Departmental programs address food safety, value-added food processing, environmental impact of food processing, and nutritional 
health. Food Science includes the most current information related to biotechnology, engineering approaches and computer applications as they relate to 
providing safe foods with minimal impact on the environment. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Increasing consumer concern regarding food safety and demands for greater varieties of nutritious and convenient foods of uniformly high quality create 
many varied career opportunities in the food and allied industries. Career opportunities in food industries include management, research and development, 
process supervision, quality control, procurement, distribution, and sales and merchandising. Positions include sales and services in allied industries, 
consulting and trade association activities, and promotional and educational services. Food Science graduates hold teaching, research and extension positions 
with colleges and universities. Governmental agencies employ food scientists whose work is directed toward research, regulatory control and the 
development of food standards. 

The food industry provides both merit and financial need scholarships to encourage students preparing for careers in Food Science. Phi Tau Sigma invites 
outstanding seniors to membership, and all students are encouraged to participate in the Food Science Club, a student branch of the Institute of Food 
Technologists. 

CURRICULA 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Food Science is offered through curricula with a science emphasis or a technology emphasis. The science 
program is designed for students with interest in graduate school or for those desiring more rigorous science courses for technical careers in the food 
industry. Students more interested in business opportunities for technically trained individuals find the technology program permits greater flexibility in 
complementing Food Science coursework with business, agricultural commodity and computer science courses. 

MINOR IN FOOD SCIENCE 

The minor in Food Science is designed to provide important food science principles and concepts to students seeking to improve their imderstanding of food 
and food processing and especially to those seeking employment as chemists, microbiologists, engineers, nutritionists, business specialists, or technical 
writers in the food or pharmaceutical industry. One introductory course (FS 201) is required, and 12 additional hours at the 300 or 400 level may be selected 
to complement a variety of majors. 



86 



SCIENCE CURRICULUM IN FOOD SCIENCE 

Degree earned: B.S. in Food Science 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 107 Precalculus I 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Any 100-level in PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Is Spring Semester Credits 

I CH lOI Chemistry - A Molecular Science 3 

4 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 1 

3 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 3 

3 FS 201 Food Science & the Consumer 3 

3 MA 131 Calculus for Life and Mgmt. Science A 3 

I Physical Education Elective 1 

15 14 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fait Semester Credits 

CH 22 1 Organic Chemistry I 4 

FS 290 Preparing for Careers in Food Science 1 

MA 23 1 Calculus for Life and Management Science 3 

MA 132 Comp. Math for Life and Mgmt. Science 1 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 3 

16 



Spring Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry I! 

FS 23 1 Food Engineering 

PY 212 College Physics 11 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits 
4 
4 
4 
3 
15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 201 - Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 

ST 3 1 1 Intro, to Statistics 

Communication Elective' 

Food Science Elective'' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 BCH 45 1 Prin. of Biochemistry 

1 FS 400 Prin. of Human Nutrition 

3 FS 403 Food Analysis 

3 MB 351 General Microbiology 

3 MB 352 General Microbiology Lab 

4 Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
16 



Credits 
4 
3 
4 
3 
1 
3 
18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology 
FS (MB) 406 Food Microbiology Lab 
FS 421 Food Preservation 
Humanities/Social Science. Electives' 
Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
6 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

FS 475 Prob. & Design in Food Science 
Food Science Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Electives' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
6 
IS 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 126' 



'Two credit hours of PE (including any 100-level Fitness & Wellness course) are required for graduation.. 

'These courses must be selected from the approved GER listing for Humanities and Social Sciences as follows: 

6 credits in history and/or literature, 3 credits from philosophy, religion or visual and performing arts, 6 credits from two different areas in psychology, 

economics, politics and government, sociology, anthropology or cultural geography, 3 credits of science technology and society from a humanities and 

social science perspective. The final 3 credits may be from any courses in the aforementioned categories. At least 1 course in the Humanities and Social 

Sciences must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'Course must be selected from the approved GER Communication Electives List. 

'Students must have demonstrated foreign language proficiency at the Fl 102 level. 

'Students wishing to apply to the College of Veterinary Medicine at N.C. State should take GN 41 1 and one course in animal nutrition (ANS 230, ANS 250, 

FS(ANS,NTR) 30 1 or NTR (ANS) 415). Students should be aware that some medical schools require vertebrate zoology (ZO303/304) or anatomy (ZO 

370/375 and 371/376); genetics and parasitology are recommended. 

'a total of 35 credits of Food Science are required. 



TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM IN FOOD SCIENCE 

Degree earned: B.S. in Food Science 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp & Rhetoric 
MA 107 Precalculus I 
Communication Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

3 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

3 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 1 2 Comp. & Reading 

3 MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math. Applic. or 

15 MA 131 Calculus for Life and Mgmt. Science A 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness* 

Free Elective' 



1 

3 
1 
3 

3-4 

3 
15-16 



87 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

FS 201 Food Science & the Consumer 

FS 290 Preparing for Careers in Food Science 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

MA 231 Calculus for Life and Mgmt. Sciences B 

MA 132 Comp. Math for Life and Mgmt. Science 

PY211 College Physics I 



Credits 

4 
3 
1 

3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

FS 231 Food Engineering 

FS 322 Muscle Foods & Eggs or 

FS 324 Milk & Dairy Products 



4 
3 
1 
4 

2-3 
14-15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry or 

Free Elective' 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 

Restricted Elective' 

Physical Education Elecitve' 



Credits 

3-4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
13-14 



Spring Semester 

FS 403 Food Analysis 

Food Science Elective' 

MB 351 General Microbiology 

MB 352General Microbiology Lab 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 

Restricted Elective' 



Credits 
4 

3-4 
3 
1 
3 
3 
17-18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology 
FS (MB) 406 Food Microbiology Lab 
FS 421 Food Preservation 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 
Restricted Elective' 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
6 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

FS 416 Quality Control Food Products 

FS 475 Problems and Design in Food Science 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 

Free Elective' 



Credits 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 123' 



'Course must be selected from the approved GER Communication Electives List. 

^These courses must be selected from the approved GER listing for Humanities and Social Sciences as follows: 

6 credits in history and/or literature, 3 credits from philosophy, religion or visual and performing arts, 6 credits from two different areas in psychology, 

economics, politics and government, sociology, anthropology or cultural geography, 3 credits of science technology and society from a humanities and 

social science perspective. The final three credits may be from any courses in the aforementioned categories. At least 1 course in the Humanities and Social 

Sciences must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'Nine credits of Business or Economics must be included or the student must complete a minor in any field of their choosing. If the Business/Economics 

option is elected, EC 201 or ARE 201 is required. Six additional credits of Business and Economics electives should be selected from the following: ARE 

306, ARE 311, ARE 312, ARE 423, ARE 433, BUS 305, BUS 307, BUS 308, BUS 320, BUS 330, BUS 332, BUS 346, BUS 360, BUS 420, BUS 462, BUS 

464, BUS 465, EC 202, EC(ARE) 301, EC 302, EC(BUS) 310, EC(ARE) 336, EC(ARE) 401, EC(BUS) 404, EC 431, EC(ARE) 436, EC 448, EC(BUS) 

449. If a minor is chosen, restricted electives and free electives may be used to fulfill the minor requirements. Most minors require 1 5 to 21 credits. 

■"Two credit hours of PE (including any 100-level Fimess & Wellness course) are required for graduation. 

'a total of 33 credits of Food Science are required. 

'Students must have demonstrated foreign language proficiency at the Fl 102 level. 



DEPARTMENT OF GENETICS 

Gardner Hall, Room 3513 
Phone: (919)515-2292 



www.cals.ncsu.edu/genetics/ 



S. E. Curtis, Head and Director of Graduate Programs 

W. H. McKenzie, Undergraduate Teaching Coordinator and Undergraduate Minor Administrator 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: T.H. Emigh, W.H. McKenzie; William Neal Reynolds Professors: W.R. Atchley, T.F.C. Mackay; 
Distinguished University Professor: J.G. Scandalios; Professors: S.E. Curtis, W.E. Kloos, HE. Schaffer, S.L. Spiker; Adjunct Professor: M.D. Chilton; 
Professors Emeriti: CH. Bostian, WD. Hanson, C.S. Levings, T.J. Mann, D.F. Matzinger, R.H. Moll, C.W. Stuber, AC. Triantaphyllou; Associate 
Professors: M.T. Andrews, M.A. Conkling, J.W. Mahaffey; Assistant Professors: E.S. Buckler (USDA), G.C. Gibson, J.C. Swaffield. M.D. Purugganan; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: E.J. Eisen, B.T. McDaniel, O.W. Robison (Animal Science); L. Hanley-Bowdoin (Biochemistry); R.S. Boston, W.F. 
Thompson (Botany); E.A. Wemsman (Crop Science); M.M. Goodman (Crop Science, Statistics, Botany); R.R. Sederoff (Forestry; Biochemistry); S.A. 
Lommel, CH. Opperman (Plant Pathology); B.S. Weir, J.L. Thome, SB. Zeng (Statistics). 

The Department of Genetics offers courses at the advanced undergraduate and graduate levels. Undergraduate students interested in genetics are encouraged 
to pursue a genetics minor (see below) in conjunction with a major in one of the basic biological or agricultural sciences. An undergraduate major in genetics 
is not available. The graduate program is designed to train scientists for research and teaching careers in genetics and molecular biology. Please refer to the 
Graduate Catalog for further information concerning the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in genetics and the Master of Genetics degree. 

MINOR IN GENETICS 

The Department of Genetics offers an undergraduate minor in genetics to provide students with strong preparation in the principles of genetics as well as 
preparation in ancillary fields such as statistics, biochemistry and microbiology. This minor is appropriate for (but not limited to) students with majors in 
agronomy, animal science, biochemistry, biological sciences, botany, crop science, environmental sciences, fisheries and wildlife sciences, food science, 

88 



forestry, horticultural science, medical technology, microbiology, poultry science, and zoology. The genetics minor requires 18 credit hours - 15 specified 
and 3 elective. A grade of C or better is required for all courses to fulfill the genetics minor requirements. 

DEPARTMENT HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

Kilgore Hall, Room 114 
Phone: (919)515-3131 



T.J. Monaco, Head 

B.H. Lane, Undergraduate Coordinator 

S. Warren, Director of Graduate Programs 



e-mail: Bryce_Lane@ncsu.edu 
e-mail: Stu WarTen@ncsu.edu 



Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: B.H. Lane; Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: D.M. Pharr; Professors: D.A. Bailey, J.R. 
Ballington Jr., T.E. Bilderback, S.M. Blankenship, FA. Blazich, A.A. De Hertogh, PR. Fantz, W.C. Fonteno, R.G. Gardner, L.E. Hinesley, W.E. Hooker, 
R.E. Lyons, T.J. Monaco, D.W. Monks, P.V. Nelson, MM. Peet, KB. Perry, DM. Pharr, E.B. Poling, M.A. Powell Jr., D.C. Sanders, C.R. Unrath, S.L. 
Warren, T.C. Wehner, D.J. Werner, L.G. Wilson, E. Young; Adjunct Professors: WW. Collins, R.L. Sawyer, PS. Zoner; Professors Emeriti: WE. 
Ballinger, A.A. Banadyga, J.F. Brooks Jr., F.D. Cochran, H.M. Covington, J.H. Harris, F.L. Haynes Jr.. W.R. Henderson, G.R. Hughes, J.M. Jenkins, T.R. 
Konsler, R.A. Larson, J.W. Love, CM. Mainland, C.H. Miller, D.T. Pope, W.A. Skroch, J.H. Wilson, Jr.; Associate Professors: J.D. Burton, S.D. Clouse, 
J.M. Davis, J.C. Neal, M.L. Parker, T.G. Ranney, JR. Schultheis; Adjunct Associate Professor: F.C. Wise (Westvaco Corp.); Associate Professor Emeritus: 
T.F. Cannon; Assistant Professors: N.G. Creamer, G.E. Fernandez, A.R. Okigbo, B.E. Whipker, G.C. Yencho; Research Assistant Professor: J.D. 
Williamson; Adjunct Assistant Professor: C.E. Niedziela; Lecturer: B.H. Lane, M.E. Traer; Researcher: J.A. Huber, K.V. Pecota, S.D. Rooks; Extension 
Specialists: L. Bass, RE. Bir; Extension Associates: K.R. Baldwin, E.B. Dish, ED. Evans, W.E. Mitchem; Associate Members of the Faculty: D.E. Carroll 
Jr. (Food Science), G.E. Hoyt (Soil Science), R.J. Volk (Soil Science), F.H. Yelverton (Crop Science). 

Horticulture is a dynamic segment of agriculture. The development, growth, distribution, and utilization of fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamental plants 
plus the arts of floral design and landscaping enrich our lives with nutritious foods and more attractive surroundings. North Carolina's varied climatic 
conditions favor the production of a wide variety of horticultural crops on a commercial scale, as well as the development of parks and gardens. The 
population and amount of industry in the state are increasing, and with them the use of ornamental plants. Designers skilled in residential and commercial 
landscaping, interior plantscaping, and plant maintenance are in high demand. All this in turn has created a growth in interest in horticulture education. 

Undergraduate programs in horticultural science offer a broad based education in physical and biological sciences and a sound cultural background. Students 
can concentrate in areas of fruit and vegetable science, floriculture, woody ornamental plant science, landscape horticulture, or pursue a general approach 
which encompasses all the specialties. They are prepared for graduate study or for diverse professional service. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Horticulture graduates fill positions in production, processing, sales and service. Among these are county extension agents; vocational agricultural teachers; 
landscapers and landscape contractors; farm operators; orchard, nursery, greenhouse and garden center managers; research, production and promotional 
specialists with commercial seed, floral, fertilizer, chemical and food companies; inspectors and quality control technologists; USDA specialists and leaders 
in other phases of agricultural and industrial developments. The student may also prepare for a career in research, teaching, or extension in horticulture. 

CURRICULA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in horticultural science can be earned in either science or technology. Under the science curriculum, 
specialized education is offered in fruit and vegetable crops, floriculture, and ornamental horticulture. Under the technology curriculum, education is offered 
in landscape horticulture or in a general approach which includes all the commodity areas. 

MINOR IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

The academic minor in Horticultural Science is offered to students who desire a strong foundation in the principles of horticultural science. Students may 
choose to enhance their own major by selecting courses in a specialized area of horticulture such as fruits and vegetables, ornamentals, floriculture, or 
landscape horticulture, or they may pursue a more general approach to the entire field of study. Sixteen or seventeen credit hours are required for the minor, 
depending on courses selected. 

SCIENCE CURRICULUM IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE, FLORICULTURE CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Horticultural Science 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA l07PrecalculusI 

PE lOX' Health & Physical Fitness^ 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

I CH 1 01 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

4 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

3 HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 

I MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

3 MA 1 3 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 

15 Physical Education Elective^ 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 200 Plant Life 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

HS 290 Perspectives in Horticultural Science 

PY211 College Physics I 

Free Elective 

Physical Education Elective^ 



Credits 
4 
3 
I 
1 
4 
3 
I 
17 



Spring Semester 
CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 
HS 212 Ornamental Plants II 
SSC 200 Soil Science 
PY 212 College Physics II 
Physical Education Elective^ 



Credits 



89 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

ENT 425 General Entomology 

HS 301 Plant Propagation 

HS 440 Greenhouse Mgmt. 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 BO 421 Plant Physiology 

3 PP 3 1 5 Prin. of Plant Pathology or 

4 PP 318 Forest Pathology' 

3 Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

3 Writing/Speaking Elective'' 

17 Free Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

GN41I Prin. of Genetics 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 

HS441 Floriculture I 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Free Elective 



Credits 

4 

1 

3 

6 

2 

16 



Spring Semester 
BCH 451 Prin. of Biochemistry 
HS 442 Floriculture II 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Elective 



Credits 

4 

3 

6 

3 

16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128' 



'Students may choose from PE 101-107. 

^Four semester hours of physical education (PE) are required for graduation; the first two hours of PE taken may be counted for free elective. If a student 

chooses not to count these first two hours as free elective, these hours will not count toward graduation and two additional hours of free elective must be 

completed. 

'The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. One course from History Electives List and one course from Literature Electives List. 

B. One course from Philosophy Electives, Religion Electives, and Visual and Performing Arts Electives List. 

C. One course from the Economics Elective List and one course from the following Elective Lists: Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, 
Anthropology, and Cultural Geography. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) List. 

E. One of the courses among those elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

F. It is suggested that one of the courses elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and 
Society (Humanities and Social Science Perspective) List. If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this List must be 
taken as a Free Elective. 

^e Writing and Speaking Elective Requirement includes one course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Commun./Speech Electives List. 
'PP 315 and PP 318 offered Fall and Spring semester, respectively. Only one course required. 'Language proficiency at FL_I02 level is required for 
graduation. 

SCIENCE CURRICULUM IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE, FRUITS AND VEGETABLE CONCENTRATION 

Degree earned: B.S. in Horticultural Science 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Infro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA lOVPrecalculusI 

PE I OX' Health & Physical Fitness^ 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

I CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

I CH 1 02 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 1 2 Composition & Reading 

3 HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 

I MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

3 MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 

15 Physical Education Elective^ 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 200 Plant Life 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

HS 290 Perspectives in Horiicultural Science 

PY21I College Physics I 

Free Elective 

Physical Education Elective^ 



Credits 
4 
3 
I 
I 
4 
3 
I 
17 



Spring Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

PY 212 College Physics II 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Physical Education Elective^ 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 
ENT 425 General Entomology 
HS 431 Vegetable Production 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 BO 42 1 Plant Physiology 

3 PP3l5Prin. of Plant Pathology or 

4 PP 3 1 8 Forest Pathology' 

3 Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

3 Writing/Speaking Elective^ 

17 Free Elective 



90 



Fall Semester 

GN411 Prin. of Genetics 

ON 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 

HS 421 Physiology of Tree Fruits 

Departmental Elective' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



SENIOR YEAR 


Credits 
4 
1 
3 
3 
6 
17 


Spring Semester 
BCH451 Prin. of Biochemistry 
HS 422 Small Fruit Production 
HS 462 Postharvest Physiology 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Elective 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128' 

'Students may choose from PE 101-107. 

'Four semester hours of physical education (PE) are required for graduation; the first two hours of PE taken may be counted for free elective. If a student 

chooses not to count these first two hours as free elective, these hours will not count toward graduation and two additional hours of free elective must be 

completed. 

'The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. One course from History Electives List and one course from Literature Electives List. 

B. One course from Philosophy Electives, Religion Electives, and Visual and Performing Arts Electives List. 

C. One course from the Economics Elective List and one course from the following Elective Lists: Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, 
Anthropology, and Cultural Geography. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) List. 

E. One of the courses among those elected to fiilfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

F. It is suggested that one of the courses elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and 
Society (Humanities and Social Science Perspective) List. If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this List must be 
taken as a Free Elective. 

"The Writing and Speaking Elective Requirement includes one course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives 

List 

'Students may choose one from the following list of courses to fulfill the Department Elective Requirement (see THG, footnote 7). 

'PP 3 1 5 and PP 3 1 8 offered Fall and Spring semester, respectively. Only one course required. 

language proficiency at FL_102 level is required for graduation. 

TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE, GENERAL HORTICULTURE CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Horticultural Science 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 181 Introduction to Biology I 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 

HS201 Principles of Horticultural Science 

MA 107PrecalculusI 

Physical Education Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 BIO 1 83 Introduction to Biology II 

4 ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 

3 HS 290 Perspectives in Hort. Science 

3 MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math Applic. or 

3 MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

1 MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 

15 Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Writing/Speaking Elective' 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

Departmental Elective* 

Foundation Elective'' 

Foundation Elective' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ANS/HS 2 1 5 Basic Agricultural Genetics 

I CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

3 CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

3 SSC 200 Soil Science 

3-4 Foundation Elective' 

3 Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
16-17 



Credits 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Foundation Elective 
Departmental Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 
Plant Protection Elective' 
Free Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 

3-4 

3 

16-17 



Spring Semester 
BO 421 Plant Physiology 
ARE/BUS Elective l' 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Plant Protection Elective' 
Specialization Elective' 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 

3-4 
16-17 



91 



Fall Semester 
ARE/BUS Elective II' 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 
Specialization Elective' 
Specialization Elective' 
Free Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 


Credits 


Spring Semester 


3 


Departmental Elective' 


3 


Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 


3 


Specialization Elective' 


3-4 


Physical Education Elective' 


3 


Free Elective 


15-16 





Credits 
3-4 
3 

3-4 

1 

3 

13-15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128' 

'Two courses, one credit hour each, in physical education are required. This requirement includes one Fitness & Wellness course. 
^The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. One course from History Electives List and one course from Literature Electives List. 

B. One course from Philosophy Electives, Religion Electives, and Visual and Performing Arts Electives List. 

C. One course from the Economics Elective List and one course from the following Elective Lists: Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, 
Anthropology, and Cultural Geography. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) List. 

E. One of the courses among those elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

F. One of the courses among those elected to fiilfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements must come from the Science, Technology, and Society 
(Humanities and Social Science Perspective) List. 

'The Writing and Speaking Elective Requirement includes one course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives 

List 

'Students must choose a minimum of 13 hours from the Foundation Electives column, 6 hours from the Plant Protection Electives column, 12 hours from the 

Specialization Electives column, and an additional 12 hours of Departmental Electives. The 12 hours of Departmental electives can be selected form any 

course in any column below not already taken as a Foundation, Plant Protection, or Specialization requirement. Departmental Electives can also include HS 

295, HS 495, or any 500-level HS course as well as up to 6 hours (combined) of HS 492, External Learning Experience and HS 493, Internal Learning 

Experience. All students are strongly encouraged to participate in a learning experience as part of their undergraduate coursework. 



Foundation Electives 
(13 hours minimum) 

CH 220 Intr. to Organic Chemistry (4,F/S/SS) 

BO/ZO 360 Ecology (3, F/SS) 

BO/ZO 365 Ecology Lab (1, F/SS) 

HS 21 1 Ornamental Plants I (3, F) 

HS 212 Ornamental Plants II (3, S) 

HS 301 Plant Propagation (4, F) 

SSC34I Soil Fertility (3, F) 

SSC 342 Soil Fertility Lab (I, F) 

SSC 461 Soil Physics (3, F) 

PY 21 1 College Physics I (4, F/S) 

PY 212 College Physics II (4, F/S) 



Plant Protection Electives 
(6 hours minimum) 

CS 414 Weed Science (3, F) 
CS 415 Agron. Pest Mgt. Sys.(3, F) 
ENT 425 General Entomology (3,F) 
PP 315 Plant Pathology (4, F) 
PP 318 Forest Pathology (3, S) 
Departmental Electives 
(12 hours minimum) 



Specialization Electives 
(12 hours minimum) 

CS 200 Turf Management (4, F) 
HS 342 Landscape Horticulture (3, F/S) 
HS 371 Interior Plantscapes (3, S[alt, odd]) 
HS 41 1 Nursery Management (3,F) 
HS 421 Tree Fruit (3, S[alt, odd]) 
HS 422 Small Fruit (3, S[alt, even)) 
HS 431 Vegetable Production (4, F) 
HS 440 Greenhouse Management (3, F) 
HS 442 Prod, of Floricultural Crops (3, S) 
HS 462 Post Harvest Physiology (3, S) 
HS 471 Tree and Grounds Mgmt. (4, S) 



'Students are required to take a minimum of 9 hours of coursework in Economics and Business; one course in economic principles (see item C under 

footnote 2 above), one course in management or marketing (ARE/BUS Elective I), and one course from a set of business and economic courses (ARE/BUS 

Elective II). Students may choose from the following lists. 

'PP 3 1 5 and PP 3 1 8 offered Fall and Spring semester, respectively. Only one course required. 

'students may choose one from the following list of courses to fulfill the Department Elective Requirement: 



ARE/BUS Elective I List (Select 1) 

ARE 303 Farm Management (3, F/S) 
ARE 304 Agribusiness Management (3, S) 
ARE 3 1 1 Agribusiness Markets (3, F/S) 
ARE 3 12 Agribusiness Marketing (3, S) 



ARE/BUS Elective II List (Select 1) 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting (3, F/S) 

ARE 303 Farm Business Management (3, F/S) 

ARE 304 Agribusiness Management (3, S) 

ARE 306 Agricultural Law (3, F/S) 

ARE 309 Environmental Law and Economic Policy (3, F) 

ARE 3 1 1 Agricultural Markets (3, F/S) 

ARE 3 12 Agribusiness Marketing (3, S) 

ARE 321 Agricultural Financial Management (3, F/S) 

BUS 307 Business Law I (3, F/S) 

BUS 320 Financial Management (3, F/S/SS) 

BUS 330 Human Resource Management (3, F/S) 

BUS 360 Marketing Methods (3, F/S) 



'Language proficiency at FL_102 is required for graduation. 



92 



TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE, LANDSCAPE HORTICULTURE CONCENTRATION 

Degree earned: B.S. in Horticultural Science 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 181 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA l07Precalculusl 

Any lOO-level in PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 



Credits Spring Semester 

I BIO 183 

4 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

3 LAR 234 Intro, to Environ. Design 

3 MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math Applic. or 

1 MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

3 MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 

IS Physical Education Elective^ 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective' 



3 

3 

17-18 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

HS 21 1 Ornamental Plants I or 

HS 290 Perspectives in Horticultural Science 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Physical Education Elective' 



Is Spring Semester 

3 BO 360 Intro, to Ecology 

I BO 365 Ecology Lab 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

I CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

6 HS 2 1 2 Ornamental Plants II 

1 HS 342 Landscape Horticulture 

15 Physical Education Elective' 



Credits 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

LAR 430 Site Planning 

PY 131 Conceptual Physics 

SSC 200 Soil Science' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Writing/Speaking Elective* 



Credits 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
17 



Spring Semester 

HS 400 Resident. Landscaping 

LAR 457 Lndscp Const Materials Meth & Doc 

PP 315 Prin. of Plant Pathology or 

PP 318 Forest Pathology' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Fall Semester 

ENT 425 General Entomology 

HS41I Nursery Mgmt. 

LAR 400 Landscape Arch. Studio 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

3 BO 42 1 Plant Physiology 

3 HS416Prin.Om. Plant Design 

6 HS 471 Tree & Grounds Maintenance 

3 Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

15 Free Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
4 
3 

3-4 
17-18 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128' 

'Students may choose from any PE 100 level course in Fitness & Wellness. 

'Four semester hours of physical education (PE) are required for graduation; the first two hours of PE taken may be counted for free elective. If a student 

chooses not to count these first two hours as free elective, these hours will not count toward graduation and two additional hours of free elective must be 

completed. 

'The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. One course from History Electives List and one course from Literature Electives List. 

B. One course from Philosophy Electives, Religion Electives, and Visual and Performing Arts Electives List. 

C. One course from the Economics Elective List and one course from the following Elective Lists: Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, 
Anthropology, and Cultural Geography. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) List. 

E. One of the courses among those elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

F. It is suggested that one of the courses elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and 
Society (Humanities and Social Science Perspective) List. If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course fit>m this List must be 
taken as a Free Elective. 

*The Writing and Speaking Elective Requirement includes one course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives 

List. 

'PP 315 and PP 318 offered Fall and Spring semester, respectively. Only one course required. 

'Language proficiency at FL_102 is required for graduation. 



93 



SCIENCE CURRICULUM IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE, ORNAMENTALS CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Horticultural Science 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 107PrecalculusI 

PE lOX' Health & Physical Fitness^ 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

I CH 1 1 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

I CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

3 HS 201 Prin. of Horticulture 

1 MA 121 ElemenU of Calculus or 

3 MA 131 Calculus for Life & Mgmt Sci. 

15 Physical Education Elective' 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 200 Plant Life 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 127 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

HS 21 1 Ornamental Plants I 

HS 290 Perspectives in Hort. Science 

PY211 College Physics 1 

Physical Education Elective' 



Credits 
4 
3 
1 
3 
1 
4 
1 
17 



Spring Semester 
CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 
HS 212 Ornamental Plants II 
FY 212 College Physics II 
SSC 200 Soil Science 
Physical Education Elective' 



Credits 
4 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 
ENT 425 General Entomology 
HS 301 Plant Propagation 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 BO 42 1 Plant Physiology 

3 PP 31 5 Prin. of Plant Pathology or 

4 PP 3 1 8 Forest Pathology' 

3 Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

3 Writing/Speaking Elective'' 

17 Free Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

GN411 Prin. of Genetics 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 

HS411 Nursery Mgmt. 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Free Elective 



Credits 
4 
1 
3 
6 
2 
16 



Spring Semester 

BCH 451 Prin. of Biochemistry 

HS 471 Tree and Grounds Maintenance 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

Free Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
6 
2 
16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128' 



'Students may choose from any PE 100 level course in Fitness & Wellness. 

'Four semester hours of physical education (PE) are required for graduation; the first two hours of PE taken may be counted for free elective. If a student 

chooses not to count these first two hours as free elective, these hours will not count toward graduation and two additional hours of free elective must be 

completed. 

'The Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements are 21 hours of courses as follows: 

A. One course from History Electives List and one course from Literature Electives List. 

B. One course from Philosophy Electives, Religion Electives, and Visual and Performing Arts Electives List. 

C. One course from the Economics Elective List and one course from the following Elective Lists: Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, 
Anthropology, and Cultural Geography. 

D. Two courses from any of the above lists or the Humanities and Social Sciences (Additional) List. 

E. One of the courses among those elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

F. It is suggested that one of the courses elected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and 
Society (Humanities and Social Science Perspective) List. If not taken as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this List must be 
taken as a Free Elective. 

■'The Writing and Speaking Elective Requirement includes one course from the Advanced Writing Electives List or the Communication/Speech Electives 

List. 

'PP 3 1 5 and PP 3 1 8 offered Fall and Spring semester, respectively. Only one course required. 

'Language proficiency at FL_102 level is required for graduation. 



94 



DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY 

Gardner Hall, Room 4515 
Phone: (919)515-2391 



www.nibio.ncsu.edu/niicro 



H. M. Hassan, Head 

G. H. Luginbuhl, Undergraduate Coordinator 

S.M. Laster, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: P.E. Bishop (USDA), W.J. Dobrogosz, H.M. Hassan, G.H. Luginbuhl, J.M. Mackenzie, L. W. VaiVsJ'rofessors Emerili: G.H. Elkan, J.J. Perry; 
Adjunct Professors: I.A. Casas. R.E. Kanich, T. Melton, S.R. To\e, Associate Professors: S.M. Laster, E.S. Miller, LT.D. Petty; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: K.T. Kleeman, J.M. Ligon; Assistant Professor: J. W. Brown, MR. Hyman, S.J. Libby; Adjunct Assistant Professors:VJ M. Casey, W.S. Dallas, 
S.H. Shore; Teaching Technician: W.P. Grumpier, V.M. Knowlton; Lab Supervisor: T.J. Schneeweis; Associate Members of the Faculty: D.T. Brown 
(Biochemistry), F.J. Fuller (Veterinary Medicine), T.R. Klaenhammer (Food Science), WE. Kloos (Genetics), P.E. Omdorff (Veterinary Medicine), B. 
Sherry (Veterinary Medicine), J.C.H. Shih (Poultry Science). R.G. Upchurch (Plant Pathology). 

The microbiology program provides basic preparation in microbiology, virology and immunology for professional microbiologists and students in otlier 
sciences and an awareness of the microbial world as it relates to our daily lives for non-science majors. 

Microbiology is concerned with the growth and development, physiology, classification, ecology, genetics and other aspects of the life processes of an array 
of microscopic, generally single-celled, organisms and viruses. These organisms frequently serve as model systems for elucidation of fundamental processes 
that are common to all living cells. Most of the major discoveries that have produced the spectacular advances in biology and genomic science during the 
past decade have resulted fix)m studies of microbial systems. Future developments in biotechnology, production of food and fiiel, and human and animal 
health will rely heavily on understanding microbial processes. 

OPPORTinNITIES 

Microbiologists are employed in university, governmental and industrial research laboratories, diagnostic, environmental and quality control laboratories, 
teaching, and technical sales and service positions. 

CURRICULA 

The microbiology cuiriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science degree and is designed to provide the student with a strong foundation in mathematics, 
chemistry, and physics, and skills in oral and written communication. The student will also gain broad general knowledge of molecular and cellular biology 
as well as a foundation in the basic areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology. Graduates of this curriculum will be prepared for work in research 
laboratories and production facilities or for fiirther study in graduate or professional schools. 

MINOR IN MICROBIOLOGY 

The Department of Microbiology offers an undergraduate minor available to all baccalaureate degree students at North Carolina State University who are not 
majoring in microbiology. The minor is especially appropriate for (but not limited to) students majoring in the biological or agricultural sciences, physical 
sciences or science education. The minor requires 15 semester hours including 8 hours of required courses and 7 hours from a group of restricted electives. 
Any prerequisite courses are in addition to these courses. A grade of C or better is required for all courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements. 



CURRICULUM IN MICROBIOLOGY 
Degree earned: B.S. in Microbiology 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 131Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Science A 

BIO ISl Intro, to Biology I 



Credits 
1 
3 
I 
3 
3 
4 
15 



Spring Semester 

BIO 183 Intro, to Biology II 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 231 Calculus for Life & Science Mgmt. B 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
1 
IS 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

PY211 General Physics 1 

ST 31 1 Intro, to Statistics 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 

Free Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

4 CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

3 PY 212 General Physics II 

3 MB 351 General Microbiology 

3 MB 352 General Microbiology Lab 

17 Humanities/Social Science Elective 
Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
4 
3 
1 
3 
1 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

GN411 Prin of Genetics 

MB 41 1 Medical Microbiology 

MB 412 Medical Microbiology Lab 

Communication Elective^ 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 

Free Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
I 
3 
3 
3 
17 



Spring Semester 
BO(ZO) 414 Cell Biology 
BCH 451 Elem. Biochemistry 
MB 409 Microbial Diversity 
Humanities/Social Science Elective 
Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
16 



95 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BCH 452 Biochem. Lab 

MB 490 Senior Seminar in Micro. 

MB 414 Metabolic Regulation 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective 

Microbiology Elective 

Free Elective 



Credits 
2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Spring Semester 

ENG 333 Comm.Science & Resch. 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective 

Microbiology Elective 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation' 127 



'These courses must be selected from the approved GER listing for Humanities and Social Sciences as follows: 6 credits in history and/or literature, 3 credits 
from philosophy, religion or visual and performing arts, 6 credits from two different areas in psychology, economics, politics and government, sociology, 
anthropology or cultural geography, 3 credits of science, technology and society from a humanities and social science perspective. The final 3 credits may be 
from any courses in the aforementioned categories. At least one course in the Humanities and Social Sciences must focus on a non-English spealcing culture. 
^Course must be selected from the approved GER Communication/Speech Electives List. 
'Students must have demonstrated foreign language proficiency at the FL_I02 level. 

CURRICULA IN NATURAL RESOURCES 

A. W. Oltmans, Undergraduate Coordinator. Agricultural and Resource Economics, Nelson Hall, Room 233E 
H. J. Kleiss, Undergraduate Coordinator, Soil Science, Williams Hall, Room 2321 

Wise use of all our natural resources (soil, water, air, minerals, flora, fauna and people) for the benefit of current and future members of society is the goal of 
natural resource management. This important challenge recognizes the interdependence of people with their environment and requires an integrated, multi- 
disciplinary approach to solving society's resource problems. Population growth, rising incomes, life style changes and urbanization lead to more intensive 
use of all natural resources. These trends present challenges to resource managers who must be trained in the basic principles of several disciplines in order 
to develop and apply sound management strategies to our resource problems. Natural resource professionals must understand resources and the social 
systems governing their use. They must be able to work in teams to analyze potential effects of resource use and to design ways to make efficient use of 
natural and environmental resources for current and future generations. 

To accommodate the breadth and complexity of natural resource management, the Bachelor of Science degree in natural resources is a campus-wide 
program involving three colleges and four departments that administer seven concentrations. A common core of 84 hours of course work provides a 
balanced foundation in communication, humanities, social sciences, mathematics and the natural sciences. The core course requirements include a freshman 
orientation course and a senior level applications course that natural resource majors in all concentrations must complete. Within the College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences, three concentrations are available: Economics and Management, Soil Resources and Soil and Water Systems. For information on other 
concentrations see Forestry and Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

CURRICULUM IN NATURAL RESOURCES ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Natural Resources 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CFR 1 34 Computers in Natural Resources 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 131 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Science A 

NR 100 Intro, to Natural Resources 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science and 

1 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

4 MA 23 1 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Science B 

2 PS 201 Intro, to American Govt, or 
1 PS 202 State & Local Govt. 

15 Physical Education Elective^ 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 



Full Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics or 

EC 201 Intro, to Economics I 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science and 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

PY2II College Physic I or 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Science I 

Communication Elective' 



Spring Semester 

ARE(EC) 336 Intro. Res & Env. Economics* 

BO 200 Plant Life or 

ZO 150 Intro, to Animal Kingdom 

MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math. Appl. 

ME A 101 Geology I: Physical 

ME A 110 Geology I Lab 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE(EC)30I Intermediate Microeconomics 

ARE 303 Farm Bus. Mgmt or 

BUS(EC) 310 Managerial Economics 

BO 360 Infro. to Ecology* 

BO 365 Ecology Lab* 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

ST(BUS) 350 Economics & Bus. Statisfics 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ACC 220 Accounting II or 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 

3 ENG 332 Comm. for Bus. & Mgmt or 

3 ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Research 
I History or Literature Elective' 

4 Phil., Relig., Vis/Perf. Arts Elective' 
3 Restricted Elective' 

17 



Credits 



96 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 306 Agricultural Law or 

ARE 309 Environ. Law & Economic Policy 

ARE 321 Agric. Financial Mgmt or 

BUS 320 Financial Mgmt. 

ARE (EC) 436 Environ. Economics 

History or Literature Elective' 

Restricted Elective' 



Credits 



Spring 

BUS 455 Quant. Methods in Mgmt or 

EC 45 1 Intro, to Econometrics 

EC 410 Public Finance 

NR 400 Natural Resource Mgmt 

Restricted Elective' 

Social Science Elective'' 



Credits 

3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 120 

Note; A minimum grade of C in ENG 1 1 1 and ENG 1 12, a grade point average of 2.0 in all ACC, BUS, EC and ECG courses attempted, and foreign 

language proficiency at the FL_102 level are required to be eligible for graduation. 

'MA 141 and MA 241 may be taken in lieu of MA 131andMA23I. 

^Four credit hours of PE (including any 100-level PE) are required for graduation. 

'Select from COM 1 1 0, COM 112, COM 1 46 or COM 211. 

^Science, Technology, and Society courses: ARE(EC) 336 from Humanities/Social Sciences Perspective and BO 360/365 form Science/Perspective. 

'One of these courses must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'Restricted Electives include: BAE(SSC) 323, BO 421, CS 41 1, FOR 252, FOR 401, FW(ZO) 353, FW(FOR) 404, FW(ZO)420, MEA 130, MEA 135, MEA 

140, MEA(ZO) 220, MEA 300, MEA 311, MEA 313, NR 300, SSC 361, SSC 370, SSC 461, ZO 441 or ZO 442. 

'Select from Psychology, Politics & Government, Sociology, Anthropology, and Cultural Geography Electives lists. 

CURRICULUM IN NATURAL RESOURCES, SOIL RESOURCES CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Natural Resources 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Senwster 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CFR 134 Computers in Natural Resources 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A^ 

I><R 100 Intro, to Natural Resources 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

4 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

1 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading' 

3 MA 132 Comp. Math for Life & Mgmt. Science 

3 MA 23 1 Analytic Geom. & Calc. B^ 

2 PS 201 Intro, to American Govt, or 
1 PS 202 State & Local Govt. 

15 History /Literature Elective' 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics or 

EC 201 Intro. to Economics 1 

BO 200 Plant Life 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

MEA 101 Geology LPhysical 

MEA 110 Geology I Lab 



Spring Semester 
PY211 College Physics I 
SSC 200 Soil Science 
ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 
Comm./Speech Elective' 
Physical Education Elective' 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
1 
15 



15 

JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE (EC) 336 Intro, to Res. & Envi. Econ. 

BO 360 Intro, to Ecology 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interp. & Photogram 

MB 351 General Microbiology or 

MEA 410 Intro to Geological Materials 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility & Fertilizers 

SSC 342 Soil Fertility Lab 



Spring Semester 

CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry 

NR 300 Natural Resource Measurements 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 

History/Literature Elective' 



Credits 
4 
4 
4 
3 
15 



97 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE (SSC) 323 Water Mgmt. 

BAE (SSC) 324 Elementary Surveying 

BAE 471 Land Resources Engr. or 

FOR 401 Watershed & Wetlands Hydrol. or 

SSC 562 Environ. Applic. of Soil Science 

CS 200 Intro, to Turfgrass Mgmt. or 

CS 312 Grassland Mgmt. 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech or 

ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Res. 

SSC 461 Soil Phys. Prop. & Plant Growth 



3 

3 

16-17 



Spring Semester 

NR 400 Natural Resource Mgmt 

SSC 361 Role of Soils in Envir. Mgmt. 

Phil, Relig, Vis/Perf. Arts Elective' 

Social Science Elective* 

Free Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 



127/128 



'Grade of C or better required for ENG 1 1 1 and ENG 1 12. 

^MA 141 and MA 241 may be taken in lieu of MA 131 and MA 231. 

'Two hours of PE (including any 100-level Fitness & Wellness) are required for graduation. 

'One of these courses must come from a list of courses that focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'Select from COM 1 1 0, COM 112, COM 1 46 or COM 211. 

'Select from Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology and Cultural Geography electives lists. 

Notes:Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level is required for graduation. It is suggested that one course elected to lulfill the Humanities and 

Social Sciences requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and Society (Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) elective list. If not taken 

as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this list must be taken as a Free Elective. 

CURRICULUM IN NATURAL RESOURCES, SOIL AND WATER SYSTEMS 
Degree earned: B.S. in Natural Resources 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CFR 134 Computers in Natural Resources 

ENG HI Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A^ 

NR 100 Intro, to Natural Resources 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

4 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

1 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading' 

3 MA 1 32 Comp. Math for Life & Mgmt. Science 

3 MA 23 1 Analytic Geom. & Calc. B^ 

2 PS 201 Intro, to American Govt, or 
1 PS 202 State & Local Govt. 

15 History/Literature Elective' 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 360 Intro, to Ecology 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics or 

EC 201 Intro, to Economics I 

BO 200 Plant Life 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantative Chemistry Lab 

Physical Education Elective' 



Spring Semester 
ME A 101 Geology I: Physical 
ME A 110 Geology I Lab 
PY211 College Physics I 
ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 
Comm./Speech Elective' 



Credits 
3 
1 
4 
3 
3 
14 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE(EC) 336 Intro, to Res. & Environ. Econ. 

BAE (SSC) 323 Water Mgmt. 

BAE (SSC) 324 Elementary Surveying 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

Z0 419 Limnology 

History /Literature Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Technology or 

3 ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Research 
1 MEA 200 Intro, to Oceanography 

4 NR 300 Natural Resource Measurements 
4 SSC 361 Role of Soils in Environ. Mgmt. 
3 SSC 452 Soil Classification 

18 



98 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

FOR 401 Watershed & Wetlands Hydrology or ARE 309 Environ. Law Economic Policy or 

MEA 585 Hydrogeology or FOR 472 Renewable Res. Policy and Mgmt. 3 

Advised Elective 3 BAE 471 Land Resources Environ. Engr. or 

SSC 461 Soil Physical Properties & Plant Grth. 3 SSC 562 Environ. Applications of Soil Science 3 

Phil.. Relig.. Vis/Perf.Arts Elective' 3 NR 400 Natural Resource Mgmt 4 

Restricted Elective' 3-4 ZO 460 Aquatic Natural History Lab 2 

16-17 Social Science Elective' 3 

15 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 127/128 

'Grade of C or better required for ENG HI and ENG 1 12. 

^MA 141 and MA 241 may be taken in lieu of MA 131 and MA 231. 

'Two hours of PE (including any 100-level Fitness & Wellness) are required for graduation. 

'One of these courses must come from a list of courses that focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'Select from COM 1 1 0, COM 112, COM 1 46 or COM 211. 

'Select from Psychology, Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology and Cultural Geography electives lists. 

Notes:Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level is required for graduation. It is suggested that one course elected to fulfill the Humanities and 

Social Sciences requirements also come from the Science, Technology, and Society (Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) elective list. If not taken 

as a Humanities and Social Sciences Elective, then a course from this list must be taken as a Free Elective. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT PATHOLOGY www cals ncsu edu/plantpath 

Gardner Hall, Room 2518 
Phone; (919)515-2735 

O. W. Baraett, Head 

T. A. Melton, Extension Leader 

L. F. Grand, Teaching Coordinator 

D. M. Benson, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: J. E. Bailey, O. W. Bamett Jr., D. M. Benson, R. I. Bruck, C. L. Campbell, M. E. Daub, J. M. Davis, L. F. Grand, A. S. Heagle (USDA), J.S. 
Huang, S. Leath (USDA), S.A. Lommel, T.A. Melton, J. W. Moyer, G. A. Payne, J.B. Ristaino, D. F. Ritchie, H. D. Shew, P. B. Shoemaker, T. B. Sutton; 
Professors Emeriti: ]. L. Apple, C. W. Averre, III, R. Aycock, K.R. Barker, D.F. Bateman, M.K. Beute, G. V. Gooding Jr., R.K. Jones, A. Kelman 
(University Distinguished Scholar), C.E. Main, R. D. Milholland, N. T. Powell, R.A. Reinert (USDA), J. P. Ross, J. N. Sasser, H. W. Spurr Jr. (USDA), D. 
L. Strider,, H. H. Triantaphyllou, J. C. Wells, N. N. Winstead; Associate Professors: D. Byrd, M. L. Carson (USDA), EL. Davis, B. C. Haning, J.A. 
Kolmer, P. B. Lindgren, C. H. Opperman, R. G. Upchurch (USDA); Assistant Professors: M. A. Cubeta, G. Holmes, F. J. Louws, H. Wetzel; Adunct & 
Associate Members of the Faculty: M. A. Conkling (Genetics), D. Cookmeyer (US Army), E. B. Cowling (Forestry), C.B. Davey (Forestry), W. M. Hagler 
Jr. (Animal Science, Poultry Science), G. Hellman (R.J. Reynolds), C. L. Hemenway (Biochemistry), C.S. Hodges (USES), J.L. Imbriani (NCDA), D.T. 
Kaplin (USDA, FL), M.D. Law (Novarlis), R. C. Rufty (Crop Science), S. Spencer (NCDA), V. Subbiah (R.J. Reynolds), C. G. VanDyke (Botany); Senior 
Researcher: B.B. Shrew; Researhers: S.R. Koenning, Z. Pesic-Van Esbroeck; Research/Extension Specialist: WO. Cline. 

Undergraduate instruction in plant pathology is designed to provide introductory and advanced courses on the nature and control of plant diseases to students 
majoring in crop science, horticultural science, agricultural education and forestry. It also provides fundamental training necessary for graduate study in 
plant pathology. 

OPPORTirNITIES 

Employment in research, extension and teaching is available to graduates with advanced degrees in plant pathology. Research openings are with the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, state experiment stations, industry and private consulting. The rapid development of agricultural chemicals, biotechnology and 
other methods for disease control offers numerous opportunities. 

DEPARTMENT OF POULTRY SCIENCE 

Scott Hall, Room 203 
Phone: (919)515-2626 

G. B. Havenstein, Head 
F. T. Jones, Department Extension Leader 
S. L. Pardue, Undergraduate Coordinator 
T. D. Slopes, Director of Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: C. R. Parkhurst; Professors: J. T. Brake, T. A. Carter, V. L. Christensen, W. J. Croom, F. W. Edens, J. D. 
Garlich, W. M. Hagler Jr , G. B. Havenstein, F. T. Jones, J. F. Ort, S.L. Pardue. M. A. Qureshi, B.W. Sheldon, J. C. H. Shih, T. D. Slopes; M. J. Wineland; 
Adjunct Professors: M. R. Bakst, D. Balnave, W. L. Bryden, R. R. Dietert K. K. Krueger, K. A. Schat; Professors Emeriti: W. G. Andrews, R. E. Cook, E. 
W. Glazener, P. B. Hamilton, J. R. Harris, C. H. Hill. G. A. Martin, W. C. Mills Jr., T. B. Morris; Associate Professors: K. E. Anderson, G. S. Davis, P. R. 
Ferket, J.L. Grimes, J. N. Petitte; Adjunct Associate Professors: W. E. Brown, C. A. Ricks, J. L. Tyczkowski; C. E. Whitfill; Assistant Professors: D. K. 
Carver, J. L. Grimes, C. M. Williams; Adjunct Assistant Professor: R. P. Gildersleeve; Associate Members of Faculty: R. W. Bottcher (Biological and 
Agricultural Engineering), P. A. Curtis (Food Science), B. W. Sheldon (Food Science), D. P. Wages (College of Veterinary Medicine). 

The Department of Poultry Science provides instruction in the principles of vertically integrated poultry production and in such related fields as nutrition, 
physiology, genetics, immunology, toxicology, biotechnology, and general poultry management. Through teaching, research, and extension, the department 

99 



serves students, poultry producers, and allied industries. Poultry production has increased rapidly during the last several decades and ranks first in North 
Carolina as a source of agricultural income. North Carolina ranks third nationally in the production of poultry products; the climatic and economic 
conditions in the state provide a sound base for continued expansion. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The change from small farm operations to large commercial poultry enterprises has created more specialized positions than there are available poultry 
graduates. Production-oriented positions and off-the-farm operations in activities such as processing and distribution offer new job opportunities. The allied 
industries -- feed, equipment, financing, pharmaceutical and other supplies -- need more employees trained in poultry science. Graduates hold positions as 
managers and field representatives for businesses identified with or serving the poultry industry. Graduates are also employed in communication and public 
relations and as teachers and extension and research specialists. Some graduates have their own poultry businesses. 

CURRICULA 

Students desiring the Bachelor of Science with a major in poultry science may choose either the science or technology curriculum offered by the Department 
of Poultry Science. (See the Graduate Catalog). One may obtain a double major in certain other curricula through careftil use of electives and/or summer 
school attendance. The student should consult the undergraduate advisers in the department(s) concerned. Currently, the pre-veterinary science student may 
utilize all requirements toward a Bachelor of Science degree in the science option. See the freshman year and basic requirements for College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences. 

The science curriculum is for the student interested in the basic biological and physical sciences. The student is better prepared for advanced study in various 
disciplines such as genetics, nutrition, physiology, and pathology. Several pre-veterinary students are currently enrolled in this curriculum and are seeking a 
Bachelor of Science degree in poultry science. (See Pre-Professional Program in Veterinary Medicine). 

The technology curriculum in poultry science is designed to prepare students for direct entry into the poultry industry upon graduation; allows a greater 
selection of courses in business and economics; and offers a student both basic and applied knowledge in poultry production which can be used directly in a 
poultry operation upon graduation. 



SCIENCE CURRICULUM IN POULTRY SCIENCE 
Degree earned: B.S. in Poultry Science 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 107 PreCalculus Algebra & Trig. I 

Any 100-level PE in Fimess & Wellness' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 CH 101 General Chemistry I 

4 CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

3 COM 1 1 Public Speaking 

3 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

1 MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

3 MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 

IS Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics 

BAE 121 Computer Applic. in ALS or 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers & Uses 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

PO 201 Poultry Science & Prod. 

PO 290 Poultry Seminar 

Physical Education Elective 



Spring Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

ST 3 1 1 Intro, to Statistics 

Group A Elective' 

Humanities/Social Science. Electives^ 



Credits 
4 
3 
4 
6 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 
CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 
PO (ANS.FS) 322 Muscle Foods & Eggs 
PO (ANS,NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition' 
PY 131 Conceptual Physics or 
PY2I1 College Physics I 
Humanities/Social Science. Electives^ 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Research 
GN411 Prin. of Genetics 
ACC/ARE/BUS/EC Elective* 
Humanities/Social Science. Electives^ 
Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MB 351 General Microbiology 
MB 352 General Microbiology Lab 
PO 405 Avian Physiology 
Humanities/Social Science. Electives^ 
Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
4 
3 
4 
15 



Spring Semester 
PO 430 Poultry Breeding 
VMF 401 Poultry Diseases 
Group A Elective' 
Free Electives 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
6 
16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



100 



'Two semester hours of Physical Education (PE) credit are required for graduation. 

' a) At least one HSS course must focus on a non-English speaking culture. In addition, one course must be from the Science, Technology, and Society HSS 

Electives list. 

b) Two courses from History Electives and Literature Electives list. 

c) One course in the study of philosophy, religion, or the visual and performing arts 

d) Two courses from the HSS Electives list. 

e) One course in the study of psychology, politics and government, sociology, anthropology, or cultural geography. 
'One course from the Group A Electives listed in the CALS section of the NC State Undergraduate Bulletin. 

■"One course in the study of accounting, agricultural and resource economics, business management, or economics. 
'Foreign language proficiency at the FL_I02 level will be required for graduation. 



TECHNOLOG\ CURRICULUM IN POULTRY SCIENCE 
Degree earned: B.S. in Poultry Science 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG ! 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA l07PreCalculusI 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 CH 101 General Chemistry I 

4 CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

3 COM 110 Public Speaking 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

I MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

3 MA 1 3 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 

15 Free Elective 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics 
CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry or 
CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 
PO 201 Poultry Science & Prod. 
PO 290 Poultry Seminar 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective^ 
Physical Education Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 BAE 121 Computer Applications in ALS or 

3 CSC 200 Infro. to Computers & Uses 
1 CH 201 General Chemistry II 

4 CH 202 General Chemistry II Lab 
I ARE/EC Elective' 

3 Poultry Elective' 

I Free Elective 

16 Physical Education Elective 



3 
3 
1 
3 
2 

3^ 

1 

16-17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN4II Prin. of Genetics 

PO (ANS,FS) 322 Muscle Foods & Eggs 

PO (ANS,NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition' 

ACC/ARE/BUS/EC Elective' 

Humanities/Social Science. Electives^ 



Credits 

3-4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15-16 



Spring Semester 

ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Research 

PO 430 Poultry Breeding 

Group A,B,C Electives' 

Humanities/Social Science. Electives^ 

Free Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MB 35 1 General Microbiology 

MB 352 General Microbiology Lab 

PO 405 Avian Physiology 

Humanities/Social Science. Electives' 

Poultry Elective' 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
I 

4 
3 
2 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

PO 425 Feed Mill Mgmt./Form. 

VMF 40 1 Poultry Diseases 

Group A Elective' 

Poultry Elective'' 

Free Elective 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



128 



'Two semester hours of Physical Education (PE) credit are required for graduation. 

' a) At least one HSS course must focus on a non-English speaking culture. In addition, one course must be from the Science, Technology, and Society HSS 

Electives list. 

b) Two courses from History Electives and Literature Electives list. 

c) One course in the study of philosophy, religion, or the visual and performing arts. 

d) One course in the study of psychology, politics and government, sociology, anthropology, or cultural geography. 

'One course from the following: ARE 210, ARE(EC) 301, ARE 311, ARE(EC) 336, ARE 433, ARE 436, EC 202, EC 302, or EC 372. 

'Select 3 courses from the following: PO 301, PO 420, PO 422, or PO 423. 

'One course in the study of agricultural and resource economics, business management, accounting, or economics. 

'Courses from the A, B, C, Electives listed in the NC State Undergraduate Bulletin. 

'One course from the Group A Electives listed in the NC State Undergraduate Bulletin. 

'Foreign language proficiency at the FL_I02 level is required for graduation. 



101 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY http://sasw chass ncsu.edu/s&a/s&ahmpg.htm 

1911 Building, Room 301 
Phone: (919)515-3180 

W. B. Clifford, Head 

E. M. Woodrum, Associate Head 

R. S. Ellovich, Undergraduate Administralor 

J.C. Leiter, Director of Graduate Programs 

S.C. Lilley, Department Extension Leader 

Professors: V. M. Aldige, W. B. Clifford, L. R. Delia Fave, T. J. Hoban, J. C. Leiter, R. L. Moxley, L. B. Otto, B. J. Risman, M. D. Schulman, D. T. 
Tomaskovic-Devey, R. C. Wimberley, E. M. Woodrum, M. T. Zingraff; Professors Emeriti: J. N. Collins, E. M. Crawford, V. E. Hamilton, T. N. Hobgood 
Jr., C. P. Marsh, M. E. Voland, J. N. Young; Associate Professors: M. P. Atkinson, R. F. Czaja, S. K. Garber, T. N. Greenstein, S. C. Lilley, P. L. McCall, 
L Rovner, A. L. Schiller, M. L. Schwalbe, ME. Thomas, M. S. Thompson, R. J. Thomson, K. M. Troost, M. L. Walek, J. M. Wallace, C. R. Zimmer; 
Associate Professors Emeriti: R. C. Brisson, A. C. Davis, G. S. Nickerson, J. C. Peck, P. P. Thompson; Adjunct Associate Professor: J.F. Thigpen (East 
Carolina University); Assistant Professors: R. S. Ellovich, R.L. Engen W. R. Smith; Assistant Professors Emeriti: C. G. Dawson, T. M. Hyman; Associate 
Members of the Faculty: R. D. Mustian (Department of Agricultural and Extension Education), M. M. Sawhney (CHASS Dean's Office), MA. Zahn 
(CHASS Dean's Office). 

This Department teaches students the principles and techniques for understanding human group behavior. More specifically the department seeks to educate 
students in understanding communities and organizations and the people who live and work within them, to qualify exceptional students at the undergraduate 
and graduate level for sociological research, teaching, and extension careers and to solve problems in human group relations. Applied sociology is good 
training for a wide variety of careers. It is usefiil for any job which involves work with people, organizations or communities. It is also good preparation for 
professional organizations or communities and for professional careers in local government, personnel relations, law, the clergy, business and management. 

CURRICULA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in applied sociology is offered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. In addition to topics in 
agricultural and community sociology, majors in this department have the option of concentrating in criminal justice. 



CURRICULUM IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY 
Degree earned: B.S. in Applied Sociology 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 105 Biology in Modem World or 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA I07PreCalculusl 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

SOC 202 Prin. of Sociology 



Spring Semester 

CH 100 Chemistry & Society or 

CH 101 General Chemistry I and 

CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 

SOC 241 Soc. of Agric. & Rural Society 

Free Elective 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers or 

Computer Science Elective 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Behavior 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 

ST 311 Intro, to SUtics 

English, Comm. or Foreign Lang. Elective' 

Physical Education Elective' 



Fall Semester 

SOC 300 Social Research Methods 

SOC 3 1 1 Community Relationships 

History Elective' 

Restricted SOC Elective (300+)' 

Free Elective 



Fall Semester 

SOC 351 Population and Planning 
SOC 410 Soc. of Organization 
Humanities/Social Science. Electives^ 
Free Elective 



Spring Semester 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology'^ 



3 ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics or 




3 EC 201 Intro, to Economics I 


3 


3 PS 201 Intro, to American Govt, or 




3 PS 202 State & Local Govt. 


3 


3 PY 131 Conceptual Physics 


4 


I Literature Elective'' 


3 


16 


16 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


4 ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 


3 


3 SOC 400 Theories of Social Structure or 




3 SOC 40 1 Theories of Social Interaction 


3 


3 Mathematical or Natural Science Elective' 


3 


3 Phil, Relig, Vis/Perf. Arts' 


3 


16 Free Elective 


3 




15 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 SOC 492 or 493 Field Work in Appl. Soc. 


3 


3 Elective (A,B,C, or Hum. & Social Science)' 


7 


6 Restricted SOC Elective (400+)'" 


3 


3 Science, Technology & Soc. Elective" 


3 


15 


16 


Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 125 



102 



Note: Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level is required to be eligible for graduation. 

'Two semester hours of Physical Education (PE) credit are required for graduation. 

^This course must be selected from the Humanities and Social Sciences List of the NC State General Education Lists of Electives. 

'This course must be selected from either the English List, the Communication List or the Foreign Language List included in the NC State General 

Education Lists of Electives. 

■"This course must be selected from the Humanities Literature List of the NC State General Education Lists of Electives. 

'This course must be selected from the History List of the NC State General Education Lists of Electives. 

'Any 300 level Sociology course other than a required course will fulfill this requirement. 

'This elective course must be selected from either the Mathematical Sciences List or either of the Natural Sciences List included in the NC State General 

Education Lists of Electives. 

"This elective course must be selected from either the Philosophy List, the Religion List or the Visual and Performing Arts List of the NC State General 

Education Lists of Electives. 

'This course may be chosen from the CALS category A, B, C, list shown in the Catalog or the Humanities and Social Sciences List in the NC State General 

Education Lists of Electives. 

'"Any 400 level Sociology course other than a required course will fiilfill this requirement. 

"This elective course must be selected from one of the Perspectives Lists within the Science Technology and Society Lists of the NC State General 

Education Lists of Electives. 

"ant 252 meets the non-English speaking culture requirement. 

CURRICULUM IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY, CRIMINAL JUSTICE CONCENTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Applied Sociology 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

BIO 105 Biology in Modem World or 

BIO 125 General Biology 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 107PreCalculusl 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

SOC 202 Prin. of Sociology 



Spring Semester 

CH 100 Chemistry & Society or 

CH 101 General Chemistry I and 

CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A 

PS 201 Intro, to American Govt. 

SOC 241 Soc. of Agric. & Rural Society 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers or 

Computer Science Elective 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Behavior 

SOC 306 Criminology 

ST 3 1 1 Intro, to Statics 

English, Comm. or Foreign Lang. Elective^ 

Physical Education Elective' 



Spring Semester 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology" 

ARE 201 Intro. Agric. & Res. Economics or 

EC 201 Intro, to Economics I 

PS 31 1 Criminal Justice Policy Process 

PY 131 Conceptual Physics 

Literature Elective' 



Credits 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 

SOC 300 Social Research Methods 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 

History Elective' 

Philo., Relig., Vis/Perf. Arts Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 SOC 400 Theories of Social Structure or 

4 SOC 401 Theories of Social Interaction 
3 Criminal Justice (SOC) Elective' 

3 Mathematical or Natural Science Elective' 

3 Restricted Sociology Elective (300+)* 

16 Free Elective 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

SOC 351 Population and Planning 
Criminal Justice (PS) Elective' 
Criminal Justice (SOC) Elective*" 
Humanities/Social Science. Electives" 
Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

SOC 413 Criminal Justice Fieldwork 
Criminal Justice (SOC) Elective'' 
Humanities/Social Science. Electives'" 
Restricted SOC Elective (400+)" 
Science, Technology & Soc. Elective'^ 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 125 



Note: Foreign Language proficiency at the FL 102 level is required to be eligible for graduation. 

'Two semester hours of Physical Education (PE) credit are required for graduation. 

"This course must be selected from either the English List, the Communication List or the Foreign Language List included in the NC State General 

Education Lists of Electives. 

'This course must be selected from the Literature List of the NC State General Education Lists of Electives. 

'This course must be selected from the History List of the NC State General Education Lists of Electives. 

'This course must be selected from either the Philosophy List, the Religion List or the Visual and Performing Arts List of the NC State General Education 

Lists of Electives. 

103 



'This course must be selected from the Sociology-Criminal Justice Course List which includes SOC 425, SOC 427, SOC 428, SOC 429, SOC 430, SOC 515, 

SOC516. 

'This course must be selected from either the Mathematical Sciences List or either of the Natural Sciences Lists included in the NC State General Education 

Lists of Electives. 

'Any 300 level Sociology course other than a required course will fiilfill this requirement. 

'This course must be selected from the Political Science-Criminal Justice Course List which includes PS 306, PS 307, PS 415, PS 445, PS 506, PS 517. 

'"This course must be selected from the Humanities and Social Sciences List of the NC State General Education Lists of Electives. 

"Any 400 level Sociology course other than a required course will fulfill this requirement. 

'^This elective course must be selected form one of the Perspectives Lists within the Science Technology and Society Lists of the NC State General 

Education Lists of Electives. 

"ant 252 meets the non-English speaking culture requirement. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOIL SCIENCE www soil.ncsu.edu 

Williams Hall, Room 2234 
Phone: (919)515-2655 

J. L. Havlin, Head 

C. D. Raper Jr., Director of Graduate Programs 

S. C. Hodges, Department Extension Leader 

H. J. Kleiss, Undergraduate Program Coordinator 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: S. W. Buol; William Neal Reynolds Professors: S. W. Buol, J. W. Gilliam; Professors: A. Amoozegar, S. W. 
Broome, D. K. Cassel, F. R. Cox, S. C. Hodges, M. T. Hoover, G. D. Hoyt, D. W. Israel (USDA), L. D. King, H. J. Kleiss, G. S. Miner, C. D. Raper Jr., M. 
J. Vepraskas, R. J. Volk, M.G. Wagger, A. G. Wollum, J. P. Zublena;/<c^Mnc/ Professors: P. G. Hunt, R. J. McCracken; /'ro/e^ori Emeriti: J. V. Baird, W. 
V. Bartholomew, M. G. Cook, G. A. Cummings, R. W. Cummings, J. W. Fitts, W. A. Jackson, E. J. Kamprath, C. B. McCants, J. A. Phillips, P. A. Sanchez, 
S. B. Weed; Associate Professors: R. A. McLaughlin, R. L. Mikkelsen, G. C. Naderman, T. J. Smylhjdjunct Associate Professor: M. R. Jucker,Associate 
Professors Emeriti: J. P. Lilly, R. E. McCollum, J. E. She\ton, Assistant Professors: D. A. Crouse, C. R. Crozier, D. L. Hesterberg, D. L. Lindbo, D. 
Osmond, J. Rideout; Adjunct Assistant Professors: C. A. Ditzler, B. D. Hudson, B. F. McQuaid, Assistant Professor Emeritus: C. K. Martin; Senior 
Researcher: W. P. Kobaige, Associate Members of the Faculty: H. L. Allen, L. T. Henry, R. Lea (Forestry); S. R. Shafer (Plant Pathology); R. W. Skaggs 
(Biological and Agricultural Engineering); G.F. Peedin, J.B. Weber (Crop Science). 

The Department of Soil Science trains students in fundamentals of soils, develops an understanding and appreciation of soils as a resource, and presents 
principles of soil management and utilization for both farm and non-agricultural purposes. Soils constitute one of the largest capital investments in farming, 
and proper soil management is essential for efficient production. Future world food needs will require people conversant in soil resources and use of 
fertilizers. Soil properties are important consideration in urban-suburban planning and development. Also, knowledge of soil and its interaction with 
potential pollutants is essential in maintaining environmental quality. Therefore, the demand for people trained in soils by private consultants, agribusiness, 
research, service planning-development, education and conservation-related agencies should continue to be great. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Soil science graduates fill positions of leadership and service in land resource planning, conservation, natural resource management and agriculture. Among 
these are opportunities as farm operators and managers, county agricultural extension agents and employees of other public advisory agencies. Natural 
Resources Conservation Service and other conservation-related agencies concerned with soil resources. Graduates also serve as technical representatives and 
salesmen in fertilizer companies and in other agribusiness activities. Many opportunities exist for private consulting soil scientists who serve a variety of 
clientele needs. Environmental concerns usually require soil science expertise, especially in land-based waste management. Provision is made for students 
wishing a more thorough training in biological sciences, chemistry, mathematics and physics leading to graduate study. (See the Graduate Catalog for a 
listing of graduate degrees ) Students with an advanced degree have wide opportunities in teaching, research, service and extension with state, federal and 
private educational and research institutions and agencies. 

CURRICULA 

The Bachelor of Science degree may be obtained with major in agronomy, natural resources or environmental sciences. The agronomy program is 
administered jointly with the Crop Science Department. A soil science concentration is available in the agronomy curriculum. Two soils concentrations are 
available in the natural resources curriculum, soil resources and soil and water resource systems. An environmental soil science concentration is available in 
the environmental sciences curriculum. (The agronomy, natural resources, and environmental sciences curricula are shown earlier under College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences.) 

MINOR IN SOIL SCIENCE 

The academic minor in soil science is offered to students desiring a strong knowledge of the principles of soil science to complement their major. It is 
intended to sfrengthen the understanding of basic physical and chemical soil properties that would be relevant to a student's particular land management 
interest. These interests may include but are not limited to conservation, forestry, geology, landscape architecture, horticulture, biological and agricultural 
engineering, agricultural business management, or agricultural education. Fourteen hours of required courses and three hours of electives are necessary to 
complete the minor. 

DEPARTMENT OF TOXICOLOGY www.cals.ncsu.edu/toxicology/index.htm 

Method Unit IV 
Phone: (919)515-2274 

G.W. Winston, Head 

G.A. LeBlanc, Director of Graduate Programs 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: E. Hodgson; Professosr: R.B. Leidy, R.C. Smart; Adjunct Professors: J.A. Goldstein, R.J. Langenbach, R.O. McClellan, 
R.M. Philpot, R.J. Preston; Professor Emeritus: T. J. Sheets; Associate Professors: G.A. LeBlanc, D. Shea; Adjunct Associate Professors: A. E. Chalmers, 
N. Chemoff, K. M. Crofton, T. E. Eling, H. B. Matthews, L. Recio; Assistant Professors: S. Branch, W.G. Cope; Visiting Assistant Professor: R.L. Rose; 
Research Assistant Professor: S. A. Meyer; Agromedicine Information Specialist: J.F. Storm; Associate Members of the Faculty: K. B. Adier (Veterinary 
Medicine), A. L. Aronson (Veterinary Medicine), C. F. Brownie (Veterinary Medicine), J. M. Cullen (Veterinary Medicine), W. J. Fleming (Zoology), H. M. 

104 



Hassan (Biochemistry. Food Science, Microbiology). W. W. Heck (Botany), J.M. Horowitz (Veterinary Medicine), R. J. Ruhr (Entomology). M. Law 
(Veterinary Medicine). R. J. Linderman (Chemistry), W. H. McKenzie (Genetics), N. A. Monteiro-Riviere (Veterinary Medicine), M. A. (Jureshi 
(Microbiology, Poultry Science), J. E. Riviere (Veterinary Medicine), C. L. Robinette (Veterinary Medicine), R. M. Roe (Entomology), I.W. Smoak 
(Veterinary Medicine), M. Stoskopf (Veterinary Medicine). 

The Department of Toxicology offers courses of study leading to the Master of Toxicology, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The 
Department of Toxicology trains qualified individuals to conduct basic and applied scientific research on the mechanisms of chemically induced toxicity, to 
advance toxicology as a science and to communicate concepts of toxicology. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY www.calsncsuedu zoology 

D. Clark Labs. Room 1 1 5 
Phone: (919)515-2741 

T.L. Grove. Head 

J.F. Gilliam, Undergraduate Coordinator 
B.J. Copeland, Director of Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: G.T. Barthalmus, J.F. Roberts; Professors: B.L. Black, P.T. Bromley, B.J. Copeland, P.D. Doerr, J.F. 
Gilliam. W.C. Grant, R.M. Grossfeld. T.L. Grove, H.F. Heatwole, T.M. Losordo, C.F. Lytle, J M. Miller, R.L. Noble, J.A. Rice, C.V. Sullivan. H.A. 
Underwood. J.G. Vandenbergh; Adjunct Professors: FA. Cross. LB. Crowder, D.E. Hoss, G.R. Huntsman, PH. Kelley, G.W. Thayer, JR. Walters; 
Professors Emeriti: P.C. Bradbury, W.W. Hassler, M.T. Huish, G.C. Miller, T.L. Quay, J.F. Roberts, D.E. Smith; Associate Professors: R.H. Anholt, J.A. 
Collazo (USDI), J.E. Hightower (USDI), J.M. Hinshaw, R.G. Hodson, S.C. Mozley, M. Niedzlek-Feaver, R.A. Powell, T.R. Simons (USDI); Adjunct 
Associate Professors: W.J. Fleming, C.S. Manooch, R.M. Shelley, H.W. van der Veer; Assistant Professors: R.J. Borski, H.V. Daniels, J.R. Godwin, N.M. 
Haddad. PS. Kas\&, Adjunct Assistant Professors: B. Bennett, A.B. Bogan, S.V. Chiavetta, R.J. Kavlock, R.W. Laney, MR. Meador, W.E. Palmer, W.C. 
Stames; Adjunct Instructors: A.L. Braswell, R.B. Hamilton; Associate Members of the Faculty: E.J. Jones (Extension Forest Resources), R.A. Lancia (Forest 
Resources), K.H. Pollock, T.G. Wolcott (Engineering and Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences). 

The Department of Zoology provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in specialized biological sciences areas. Undergraduates study all levels of 
biological organization from the molecular to the community. Zoology majors are well prepared for graduate work in zoology and related fields of sciences. 
(See the Graduate Catalog for a listing of graduate degrees.) Participation in supervised programs of research is strongly encouraged. A strong science 
background is provided for students planning to enter dentistry, medicine, optometry, veterinary medicine and allied health sciences, such as medical 
technology, physical therapy and physician assistant. Ecology, including wildlife, fisheries, behavioral ecology and marine biology, is a strong area. 
Cellular and molecular biology, including reproductive endocrinology and neurobiology, also are emphasized. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Bachelor of Science graduates in zoology have many career options. Graduates are well prepared for employment in various government agencies or private 
industries Graduates may continue their education with studies leading to advanced degrees in many areas of biological sciences such as zoology, cell 
biology, wildlife and fisheries science, marine science and biomedical subdisciplines. Many also choose to seek degrees in medicine, dentistry, veterinary 
medicine and other health-related areas. 

CURRICULA 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in zoology or fisheries and wildlife sciences is offered under the science curriculum of the College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. Within these majors a student may specialize depending upon interest and ability. 

The zoology curriculum (SZO) prepares students for graduate school, medical, dental or optometry school (SZO/SDM), and for veterinary schools 
(SZO/SPV). Certain professional schools have specific requirements which differ slightly from the zoology curriculum. Students should consult catalogs of 
specific professional schools to ensure completion of any special requirements. 

Other curricula include the fisheries (SFF) and wildlife (SFW) sciences program and the environmental science program in ecology (ESC)and the medical 
technology program (SZM). Students are advised by faculty in their special areas of interest. 

MINOR IN ZOOLOGY 

A minor in zoology is available to all baccalaureate students at NC State University, except majors in other curricula within the Zoology Department 
(Biological Sciences, Fisheries and Wildlife Science, Medical Technology, and Environmental Science— Ecology Concentration [ESC]). This minor will be 
useftil to students applying to professional schools such as medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and other health sciences. Basic knowledge in animal 
biology may also be useful to students seeking careers in government, industry, or education. The minor consists of a minimum of 1 5- 1 6 credit hours, 
including three- or four-credit zoology course (including courses cross-listed with zoology) at the 300- or 400-level. 

• Grade of C or better is required. 

CURRICULUM IN ZOOLOGY 
Degree earned: B.S. in Zoology 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ZO 150 Animal Diversity' 

MA l07PreCalculusI 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

ALS 103 Intro. Topics in ALS 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 ZO 160 Intro, to Cell and Dvlpmntl Zoology' 

3 CH 101 Chemistry- A Molecular Science 

3 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

1 MA 131 Calculus for Life and Mgmt. Science A 

1 Physical Education Elective' 
15 



Credits 
4 
3 



105 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ZO 250 Animal Anatomy and Physiology' 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

CSC 200 Intro. Computer & Uses 

Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 

COM Elective^ 



Spring Semester 

ZO 260 Evolution, Behavior and Ecology' 
CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 
Restricted Elective* 
Humanities/Social Science. Electives' 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
6 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Zoology Elective' 

CH 201 - Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 - Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

PY2I1 College Physics I 

English Elective' 



Credits 
4 
3 
1 
4 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

Zoology Elective' 

PY 212 College Physics II 

GN 41 1 Prin. of Genetics 

Restricted Elective'' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective? 



Credits 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Zoology Electives' 
Restricted Elective* 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Elective* 



Credits 
6 
4 
3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 
Zoology Elective' 
Restricted Elective* 
Humanities/Social Science. Elective' 
Free Electives* 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
6 
15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



127 



'Choose from ENG 333 Communication for Science and Research (preferred) or English Literature or ENG 33 1 or ENG 332. 

^Choose one course from COM 1 10 Public Speaking, COM 1 12 Interpersonal Communication, COM 146 Business and Professional Communication or 
COM 21 1 Argumentation and Advocacy. 

'Among 21 credits of Humanities & Soc. Science (HSS), the student must take one history ; ond iterature; one course in philosophy, religion or 
visual/performing arts ; two courses from psychology, politics, economics (recommended), government, sociology, anthropology or cultural geography^ne 
course from the Science, Technology and Society List - from the Humanities/Social Science Perspective; one additional course from any approved HSS lists. 
One of these seven courses must focus on a non-English Speaking Culture. Important Note: The list of approved HSS courses is updated periodicallyfor 
the most current list check GER web page: www2.ncsu.edu/ncsu/provost/info/academic_programs/ger/index.html 

*Your choice of 13 hours from courses listed in the Undergraduate Catalog. College of Agriculture & Life Sciences Group A (Physical and Biological 
Science). Recommended are any zoology, fisheries and wildlife, botany, microbiology, biochemistry, mathematics, and statistics courses. Up to 3 hours of 
ZO 492 or ZO 493 or ZO 624 or ALS 498 or ALS 499 can be used toward the 1 3 hours. MA 132(1 credit) is specifically recommended. Select these on the 
basisof your interests and career goals. Preveterinary second majors (SPV) must take ST 31 1, MB 351, BCH451 and one course in nutrition (ANS230or 
ANS 415). Preoptometry second majors (SDM) must take MB 351. A second calculus (e.g. MA 231) is required by some medical schools. 
'ZO 150, ZO 160. ZO 250, ZO 260 (grade"C" minimum) are required. Either ZO ISOorZO 160 may be taken first. ZO 260 may be taken after receiving 
"C" or better in ZO 150 and ZO 250 can be taken after receiving a "C" or better in both ZO 150 and ZO 160. 

'Total departmental electives must equal at least 16 credit hours. Choose from any zoology courses at the 300-level or higher, including cross-listed courses 
from other departments and up to 3 hours of ZO 492 or ZO 493 or ZO 624. MEA/ZO 220 can also be used to meet this 16-hour requirement. 
Total departmental electives must equal at least 16 credit hours. Choose from any zoology courses at the 300-level or higher, including cross-listed courses 
from other departments and up to 3 hours of ZO 492 or ZO 493 or ZO 634 or ALS 498 or ALS 499. ZO 2 1 2 cannot be used to meet these 1 6 hours of 
departmental electives, but can be used as a Restricted Elective (Footnote 4, above). 

'These electives must not be remedial, nor taken at an elementary level after you have taken comparable course work at an advanced level nor should they 
contain substantial amounts of material or themes presented in a previous course. 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE 

Patterson Hail, Room 100 

D. F. Bateman, Dean. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

J. C. Wynne, Associate Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and Director, 
N.C.Agricultural Research Service G. J. Kriz, Associate Director, N.C. Agricultural Research Service 

E. Young, Assistant Director, N.C. Agricultural Research Service 

S. A. Lommel. Assistant Director, N.C. Agricultural Research Service 

W. K. Collins. Coordinator, Tobacco Programs. N.C.Agricultural Research Service 

J. H. Britt, Assistant Director, N.C.Agricultural Research Service, Associate Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine 

J. B. Jett, Assistant Director, N.C.Agricultural Research Service and Associate Dean, College of Forest Resources 

H. Shaw, Assistant Director. N.C.Agricultural Research Service, and Dean, School of Human Environmental Sciences, University of N.C. at Greensboro 

The North Carolina Agricultural Research Service is the agricultural, life sciences, forestry, and home economics research agency of the State of North 
Carolina. It is funded principally by appropriations from the North Carolina General Assembly, federal formula fiinds, grants and contracts. 



106 



The N.C. Agricultural Research Service provides the following public services: 

• conducts research on the development and maintenance of an effective agricultural and forestry industry in North Carolina, including 
economically sound sources of supplies and equipment needed in agriculture and forestry and market outlets for the products of agriculture and 
forestry; 

• improves rural homes, rural life and rural environment; 

• maintains a reliable supply of agricultural and forestry products for the consuming public. This requires research to solve current problems and 
research to provide a foundation of scientific knowledge in the biological, physical and social sciences. The N.C. Agricultural Research Service 
faculty brings well-trained personnel to the university whose teaching in many specialized fields of agriculture, biology and the social sciences 
assures the maintenance of curricula of high standards. It contributes to the advanced training of students who are destined to become the leaders, 
teachers and investigators necessary in the maintenance of a viable agriculture and forestry industry. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The N.C. Agricultural Research Service publishes bulletins and scientific papers on research conducted by the staff. Copies of bulletins may be obtained 
from the Department of Agricultural Communications and scientific papers from authors. 

SERVICES 

The faculty of the N.C. Agricultural Research Service conduct original and other research bearing directly on and contributing to the establishment and 
maintenance of permanent and effective agricultural and forestry industries in North Carolina. This research includes field and laboratory experimentation in 
the biological, physical, social, and environmental sciences. Primary emphasis is given to the production, processing, distribution, and consumption of the 
many agricultural and forestry commodities produced throughout the state. Also, major attention is given to research programs aimed at improving the 
quality of life of both rural and urban peoples. 

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE 

Ricks Hall, Room 104 

D. F. Bateman. Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
B. E. Caldwell, Interim Director, Cooperative Extension Service 
R. E. Phillips, Associate Director, Cooperative Extension Service 
M. A. Corbin, Assistant Director Home Economics 

R. G. Crickenberger, Interim Assistant Director, ANR - CRD 
M. A. Davis, Interim Assistant Director, 4-H and Youth 

E. M. Prosise, Interim Assistant Director County Operations 

R. W. Shearon, Assistant Director Program Staff and Organizational Development 

The Cooperative Extension Service of North Carolina State University is a cooperative undertaking among the United States Department of Agriculture, the 
State of North Carolina, the 100 counties in the state and the Cherokee Indian Reservation. Its work is supported by federal funds made available under the 
Smith-Lever Act of I9I4, as amended by state and county appropriations, and by grants and contracts. 

The federal and state appropriations are used to maintain an administrative and specialist staff and to pay a portion of the salary and the travel expenses of 
the county extension agents. Under this cooperative arrangement, the Cooperative Extension Service serves as the "educational arm" of the United States 
Department of Agriculture and as the "field faculty" of North Carolina State University in the areas of agriculture and natural resources, family living, 4-H 
and youth, and community and rural development. 

The primary purpose of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service is to provide the people of the state with the latest and best informafion— 
particularly that which is related to agriculture and natural resources, home economics and youth, and rural development-and help them to interpret and use 
this information in building a more prosperous and satisfying life. 

This program has sufficient flexibility to permit special attention to the problems, needs and interests of the people in each county. County Advisory 
Councils are utilized to determine and prioritize the county educational program content. Assistance is given to individuals, families, communities, 
agricultural and seafood processing and marketing firms, other businesses and certain organizations. This includes work with adults and youth in both the 
city and rural areas. 

In carrying out this educational program, a variety of methods and techniques are employed: method and result demonstrations; meetings; visits to farms, 
homes and businesses; organized groups of men, women and youth; tours; leaflets, pamphlets and other printed materials and mass media. 
The basic sources of information to be taught through this educational program are the findings and recommendations resulting from research conducted by 
the Agricultural Research Service in this and other states and by the United States Department of Agriculture. 

AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 

Panerson Hall. Room 107 

D. F. Bateman, Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

J. L. Oblinger, -4«oc/a/e Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and Director, Academic Programs 

J.C. Comwell, Director and Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs 

The Agricultural Institute is a two-year academic program which awards the Associate in Applied Science Degree upon successful completion of at least one 
of eight curricula. The Agricultural Institute provides education and training in food, pest control, agriculture, horticulture, turfgrass management and 
agribusiness. It is part of the academic programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at North Carolina State University. Provision for the 
Agricultural Institute was made by the 1959 North Carolina General Assembly and instruction began in the Fall, I960. The objective of the Agricultural 
Institute is to provide technical training for those desiring a comprehensive education in the food and agricultural sciences, agribusiness and related areas. 

The instructional programs of the Agricultural Institute are organized and conducted as part of the overall academic program in the College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences. The Agricultural Institute is an addition to, and not a substitute for, the college's regular degree-granting program. The Agricultural 
Institute uses the same facilities (classrooms, laboratories, farms) as the four-year program. The facilities are used extensively for both teaching and 
observing the application of technology in agriculture and other closely related areas. 

107 



The faculty of the four-year program are responsible for organizing and teaching courses offered by the Agricultural Institute. Emphasis is placed on 
practical knowledge and training, with many courses requiring laboratories using hands-on experience. The Agricultural Institute offers majors in eight 
areas: Agribusiness Management; Agricultural Pest Control; Field Crops Technology; Food Processing, Distribution and Service; General Agriculture; 
Livestock Management and Technology; Ornamentals and Landscape Technology; and Turfgrass Management 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Rapid technical advancement has been important in changing agriculture from a small production industry to the nation's largest industry. Closely associated 
with production agriculture are those areas related to recreation and beautification such as turfgrass management, landscaping and ornamental plants. 
Increased production and consumer demand for convenience-type foods have stimulated the food processing industry, in turn increasing food distribution 
requirements. 

Today's complex agriculture requires a large work force. This work force must have some technical training and be able to deal with a vast array of problems 
and opportunities. Graduates of the Agricultural Institute have the education and training that is in demand by the food and agricultural industries and that 
permit them to assume responsible positions in the agriculture and allied fields. Some career examples include farm and herd managers, golf course 
superintendents, nursery managers, pest control specialists, quality control technicians, food service supervisors, sales and service of agricultural equipment 
and products, food inspectors, lawn care specialists and others. More job opportunities than graduates make salaries attractive and competitive. 
The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences maintains a Career Services Office to assist graduates in addressing resume construction, interviewing 
strategies, successflil job search techniques, location of summer internships, and job market trends. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Any individual who has received a diploma from an accredited high school or has passed the high school equivalency examination administered by the 
Department of Community Colleges is eligible for admission consideration. Each application will be reviewed and evaluated by the Director of the 
Agricultural Institute. 

For additional information write: Director, Agricultural Institute, Box 7642, 107 Patterson Hall, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7642, 
Telephone (919) 515-3248. The Worid Wide Web site is located at: hnp://www2. ncsu.edu/ncsu/cals/agi. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Graduates of the Agricultural Institute are awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree. The eight programs of study are Agribusiness Management; 
Agricultural Pest Control; Field Crops Technology; Ornamentals and Landscape Technology; Food Processing, Distribution, and Service; General 
Agriculture; Livestock Management and Technology (general livestock option, poultry option, and swine option); Turfgrass Management. 



108 



200 Brooks Hall Phone: (919)515-8310 

NCSU Box 7701 Fax: (919)515-7330 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7701 Inlernet E-mail: sodwebpage@ncsu.edu 

Visit the School of Design al: hllp:// www.design.ncsu.edu 



Marvin J. Malecha, Dean 

John Tector, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and Academic Affairs 

Martha Scotford, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, Research, Outreach and Extension 

William K. Bayley, Director, Multi-Media Laboratory 

Caroline Carlton, Librarian, Design Library 

Chris Jordan, Director, Facilities and Materials Laboratory 

Marva Motley, Director of Student Affairs 

Now in its fifth decade, the School of Design at North Carolina State University has concerned itself from the beginning with preparing designers who, in 
the broadest sense, shape the world. Design education is more than an attempt to teach a set of technical skills. The environment-including the spaces in 
which people live and work, the products they consume, and the messages they receive-have a powerful impact on how humans function as a society. Good 
design, therefore, requires attention and sensitivity to social, economic, political, cultural, and behavioral issues. The aim of all design curricula in the School 
of Design is to develop the designer's perception, knowledge, skills, and problem-solving abilities. 

The School of Design admits students through a selective process that ensures a highly motivated and heterogeneous design community. The entering 
student body consistently ranks at the top of academic achievement in the university and the School's graduation rates are the highest in the institution. While 
providing undergraduate and graduate study in multiple disciplines and encouraging individual plans of study, the School functions as a unified, interactive 
education center, dedicated to preparing designers capable of shaping the environment to various scales, but always in response to society's needs. 

DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS - The First Year Experience 

All students entering the School of Design are admitted directly into Design Fundamentals and only enter the specific major after the second semester of that 
common experience. The first year experience consists of a common two semester studio course sequence. Each semester studio earns 6 credit hours and 
meets 9 hours per week. The work outside the class is 

substantial and is largely carried out in the same communal studio space with students working both independently and in collaboration to solve the 
problems posed in the class. Most class time is spent in either hands-on work, discussion, demonstration, critique, or field trips. Emphasis is on interaction, 
independence, self-discipline, and self motivation. 

The first semester studio (DF 101) focuses on the basic vocabulary and skills common to all designers in all disciplines. This includes the basics of 
composition, an awareness of the impact of design on culture and the environment, and mastery of basic hand skills with materials and tools. Design process 
is discussed and practiced so that students learn the value of generating alternative solutions before refining and producing them. Weekly "orientation" 
lectures provide pertinent topical information and expose students to a variety of faculty and ideas in the School. 

The second semester studio (DF 102) focuses on the application of the basic information learned in the first semester to problems that are typical of the 
professions represented by current school curricula-architecture, landscape architecture, graphic design, industrial design (including textile design) and art 
and design (including the fine arts of painting, drawing, sculpture, illustration, photography, printmaking and the fiber arts). Projects involve working at a 
variety of scales-from small hand-held objects to outdoor installations. This second semester is designed to give students basic exposure to the essential 
concerns of each discipline, as well as to assist them in making a choice for later study. 

In both semesters, the fundamentals experience emphasizes learning to use the design process, establishing disciplined working habits, talking about the 
work to others (communication with the language learned in the class), and working in collaboration with others, thus forming the foundation of all 
subsequent design work in the School and in the design professions. 

CURRICULA AND DEGREES 

The School of Design offers undergraduate instruction leading to the four-year Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture, Bachelor of Art and 
Design, Bachelor of Industrial Design, and Bachelor of Graphic Design, as well as five-year degree programs leading to the Bachelor of Architecture and the 
Bachelor of Landscape Architecture. The General Education component of each curriculum consists of courses in mathematical and natural sciences, writing 
and speaking, foreign language, humanities and social sciences, physical education, science/technology/society, and communication and information 
technology. In addition to six-credit design studios where students apply their expanding knowledge and skills to theoretical and practical design problems, 
majors in the School of Design take support courses dealing with design knowledge and skills, such as communication and presentation, human behavior, 
environment, history, philosophy, physical elements and systems, methods and management. 

After a common Design Fundamentals program in the first year, students select a disciplinary major. The curriculum path is flexible, affording students the 
opportunity to concentrate in one area while making contact with the other design disciplines. In addition to their faculty mentors, students are exposed to a 
broad range of design professionals through guest lectures, juries, projects and workshops. Graduate studies are designed for students who want to build on 
undergraduate education and professional experience, as well as for those who come from non-design backgrounds and want to pursue advanced design 
degrees. The school offers graduate study in the Master of Architecture, Master of Graphic Design, Master of Industrial Design, and Master of Landscape 
Architecture programs. (Please refer to the NC State University Graduate Catalog for curriculum information on Master's programs in the School of Design.) 

Da VINCI SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

This joint program between the School of Design and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences allows students to earn two undergraduate degrees 
within five or six years: a bachelor's degree in one of the five undergraduate disciplines in the School of Design and a B.A. or B.S. degree in the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences. 

The primary purpose of the double degree is to provide students with a strong liberal education as a complement to their professional interests in design. For 
example, students majoring in Graphic Design, with a second degree that focuses on writing, may improve their opportunities for employment in 

109 



communications. A student in Architecture with a second degree in history may improve opportunities for focused graduate study in architectural history, 
preservation, or urban planning. Study of foreign language may improve students' opportunities for international design practice. 

DaVinci Scholars will earn their first degree in design with no adjustment in their design requirements. They will elect a second major from any of those 
available in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, including a Multidisciplinary Studies major (admission to the MDS program requires a statement 
of intent and proposed interdepartmental curriculum that must be approved by the MDS Degree Committee.) Most students will complete their second 
degree within one additional year of study or two summer sessions plus one additional semester. 

Students will be designated as DaVinci Scholars only during their first year of enrollment in the School of Design. To qualify for the DaVinci Scholars 
Program students must: 

• present a minimum Dean's List GPA at the end of their first semester of study in the School of Design 

• declare interest in the DaVinci Scholars Program in writing to the Associate Dean of the School of 
Design within their first year of study in the School of Design 

• be selected by a review panel composed of three faculty in the School of Design and three faculty in the College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences and chaired by the Associate Dean in the School of Design 

For more information, please contact the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and Academic Affairs, School of Design, 200B Brooks Hall, Box 7701, 
NCSU, Raleigh, NC 27695-770 1 ; (9 1 9) 5 1 5-83 1 6. 

MINOR IN DESIGN STUDIES (Non-Design Majors) 

This minors' objectives are to provide a general orientation to the practice and theory of design for students whose primary study and employment will be in 
other disciplines, to clarify the role design plays in society, and to create informed consumers who are able to make intelligent decisions about 
communication, products and environments in work and in their personal lives. 

Any undergraduate student in the university who is not majoring in a design discipline would benefit from this program. Any student seeking this minor 
should contact the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies in the School of Design for an application and assignment of a minor advisor. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE www design ncsuedu 

Brooks Hall 

Phone: (919)515-8350 

F.A. Rifki, Head 

J. P. Rand, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: P. Batchelor, G. Bizios, R. Bums, R. Clark, M. Malecha, W. Place, J. P. Rand, H. Sanoff, P. Tesar; Associate Professors: F. Harmon, F. Rifki, J. 
Tector; Assistant Professors: J. Amundson, W. Redfield, Professor Emeritus: i. Reuer, Associate Professor Emeritus: D. W. Barnes; Visiting Professor 
Emeritus: E.F. Harris, Visiting Professors: C. Bishir, N. Bums, R. Cannon, S. Cannon, E. Cassily, D. Dixon, K. Hobgood, T.C. Howard, J. Lee, J. Mann, 
W. H. McKinnon, G. Mibelli, S. Schuster, D. Stallings, E. Weinstein. 

In a world of changing conditions - social-, cultural, economic and technologlcal-the central task of the architect remains to give meaningful form to the 
physical environment. These rapid changes, however, force today's architects to not only concem themselves with traditional design issues like shelter, 
appropriateness, comfort and beauty but also to address emerging concerns like environmental conservation, rapidly expanding urban centers and towns, 
adaptive use and preservation of older buildings, providing built environments in a global market, and new means of producing architecture. The aesthetic 
revolution of the past few decades has also freed architects from the rigidity of earlier theory allowing greater diversity and expressiveness in architectural 
design. 

The Department of Architecture has addressed the diversity of roles and responsibilities through its faculty and its curricula. Its distinguished faculty 
embraces a broad definition of the practice of architecture and is, therefore, free of a singular, dogmatic, or stylistic bias. This diversity is evident in their 
experience, area of interest, national origins, and educational backgrounds. The curriculum is designed to provide opportunities for students to encounter 
faculty in both classes and informal activities. The architecture curriculum balances professional studies with a broad general education. University 
requirements in mathematics, English, natural sciences and humanities are integrated with architectural design studios and a rich selection of design support 
courses. The design studio-a working laboratory in which the student under the guidance of a professor leams how to design buildings-is central to the 
curriculum. 

The undergraduate Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture is a pre-professional degree that stresses the education of the individual and serves as 
the foundation for advanced, professional study in the discipline. The first year is spent on design fundamentals in studio common to all students in the 
School of Design. In the following years students receive a broad introduction to architectural design, theory, history, technology, and design processes 
while exploring educational opportunities within the university. 

Following the pre-professional program students may continue their studies in either of two professional programs: the one-year, post-graduate Bachelor of 
Architecture or two-year Master of Architecture program (see the Graduate Catalog for information on the latter program). Entry into both of these programs 
is competitive. To be accepted students must demonstrate potential for professional accomplishment capability in design, and satisfy a specific set of 
professionally-oriented undergraduate requirements. Many students spend one or more years gaining professional experience in architecture firms or related 
fields before pursuing the advanced degrees. Educational enrichment is an important characteristic of the architectural program. The School of Design 
regularly presents public lectures by leading professionals and exhibitions of design and art work. Electives are available in related disciplines-painting, 
sculpture, photography, landscape architecture, industrial design, and graphic design. Also available are field trips to buildings in urban centers of 
architectural interest and a variety of foreign study programs. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates with the pre-professional Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture degree pursue careers in architectural offices, building constmction, 
development, and public agencies. North Carolina and many other states have restricted professional licensing in architecture to holders of accredited 
professional degrees such as the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture. This educational requirement must be followed by three years of 
professional internship and completion of a comprehensive examination to qualify for professional certification as an architect. 

110 



CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE 

Degree earned: Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 141 History of Design I 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

Mathematical Sciences Elective 

Fitness & Wellness Elective 



Credits 
3 
6 
3 
3 
I 
16 



Spring Semester 

ARC 142 History of Design II (listCS, required) 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio 

ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 

Mathematical Sciences Elective 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
6 
3 
3 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 201 Architectural Design Studio: Environment 

ARC 2 1 1 Natural Systems & Architecture 

ARC 252 Design Methods in Architecture 

Natural Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
4 
16 



Spring Semester 

ARC 202: Architectural Design: Form 

ARC 232 Structures & Materials 

ARC 261 The Discipline of Architecture 

Natural Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
4 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 33 1 Architectural Structures I 

ARC 400 Architectural Design^ 

Humanities Elective (list C.1-C.5) 

Writing/Speaking Elective (list B) 

Social Sciences Elective (Env/Behav group) 



Credits 
3 
6 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Spring Semester 

ARC 302 Architectural Design: Technology 

ARC 332 Architectural Structures II 

ARC 441 History of Contemp. Architecture' 

Social Sciences Elective (list D) 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 400 Architectural Design^ 

ARC 432 Architectural Construction Systems' 

Adv. Humanities/Social Science (list E) 

Natural Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

ARC 402 Architectural Design: Integration 
ARC 414 Environmental Control Systems 
Science/Technology/Society Elective 
Humanities/Social Sciences 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 127 

'Courses to choose from are limited to: ANT 261; SOC 203, 220, 261; MDS 201,303. 

^One of the two ARC 400 Architecture Studios may be substituted with another 400 level, 6 credit hour, design studio in another discipline in the school. No 

more than one studio may be taken in any semester. 

'a major paper satisfying the G.E.R is required in this course. 

* Foreign language proficiency at 101/102 levels are required for graduation but do not count toward the degree requirements. 

* At least one of the elective courses must focus on a non-English speaking culture identified by asterisks in elective lists. 

* The sequence of elective courses is illustrative only and not mandatory. Students may schedule elective courses in any order which supports their 
educational objectives. 

CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE - Fifth Year Professional Program 
Degree earned: Bachelor of Architecture 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 141 History of Design I 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

Math Elective (list A.I) 

Fitness & Wellness Elective 



Credits 
3 
6 
3 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

ARC 142 History of Design II (list C5, required) 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Rhetoric 

Mathematical Sciences Elective 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
6 
3 
3 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 201 Architectural Design Studio: Environment 

ARC 211 Natural Systems & Architecture 

ARC 252 Design Methods in Architecture 

Natural Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
4 
16 



Spring Semester 

ARC 202: Architectural Design: Form 

ARC 232 Structures & Materials 

ARC 261 The Discipline of Architecture 

Natural Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
4 
16 



111 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 33 1 Architectural Structures 1 
ARC 400 Architectural Design Studio^ 
Social Sciences Elective 
Writing/Speaking Elective 
Env/Behav Social Sciences Elective 



Spring Semester 

ARC 302 Architectural Design: Technology 

ARC 332 Architectural Structures II 

ARC 441 History of Contemporary Architecture' 

Adv. Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARC 400 Architectural Design^ 

ARC 432 Architectural Construction Systems' 

Adv. Humanities/Social Sciences 

Natural Science Elective (list A. 1 or A.3) 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

ARC 402 Architectural Design: Integration 
ARC 414 Environ. Control Systems 
Science/Technology/Society Elective 
Humanities/Social Sciences 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 127 

At the completion of four year study (127 credit hours) the Bachelor of Environment Design in Architecture is granted. An application to the Fifth Year is 
required. If accepted to the program students will follow this course of study: 



Fall Semester 

ARC 501 Professional Architecture Studio I 

ARC 581 Final Project Preparation 

Architecture Elective 

Architecture Elective 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

ARC 502 Professional Architecture Studio II 

ARC 561 Practice of Architecture 

Architecture Elective 

Architecture Elective 



'One of the two ARC 400 Architecture Studios may be substituted with another 400 level, 6 credit hour, design studio in another discipline in the school. No 

more than one studio may be taken in any semester. 

^ A major paper satisfying the G.E.R is required in this course. 

* Foreign language proficiency at 101/102 levels are required for graduation but do not count toward the degree requirements. 

* At least one of the elective courses must focus on a non-English speaking culture identified by asterisks in elective lists. 

* The sequence of elective courses is illustrative only and not mandatory. Students may schedule elective courses in any order which supports their 
educational objectives. 



http://www.design.ncsu.edu 



ART AND DESIGN PROGRAM 

Leazar Hall 
Phone:(919)515-8315 

C. Joyner, Program Director 

Professors: C. Joyner, M. Pause, S. Brandeis; Professors Emeriti: G. L. Bireline, D. R. Stuart, W. Taylor; Associate Professors: C. Cox, L. M. 
Diaz, D. Raymond, S. Toplikar, C. Raub; Assistant Professors: P. Fitzgerald; Visiting Associate Professor: K. Rieder. 

The Art and Design Program awards the Bachelor of Art and Design degree. The pedagogical core of the program aims to reinforce the foundation 
principles of design theory as applied to two- and three-dimensional design. Our curriculum addresses broad cultural, ecological, and societal considerations 
and promotes in our graduates the ability to meet the challenges of collaborative design. We emphasize the application of creative thinking and problem 
solving to design projects ranging from single to mass-produced artifacts. The areas of application span the range from traditional fine art to interactive 
media. Examples of current areas of study include interactive computer graphics, animation, illustration, sculpture, painting, drawing, fibers, exhibition 
design, textile design, and emerging areas in the media arts. 

The Art and Design Program firmly believes there is an essential need for students in a technically-based research university to engage in course work that 
fosters creative thinking. To meet this need, the department offers courses to non-majors as well as a minor in Art and Design, available to majors in any 
field in the university. Four specific options are currently available: fibers and surface design, painting, drawing, and sculpture. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Career opportunities for graduates of the Department of Art and Design span the range from traditional fine art to new media systems. Graduates of this 
department are currently working in fields such as advertising, multimedia, illustration, exhibition design, textile design, fashion design, art and design 
education, photography, film making, special effects, set design, and in all areas of fine arts. 



CURRICULUM AND DEGREES 

The Art and Design Program awards the Bachelor of Art and Design degree. The Bachelor of Art and Design degree is a broadly based, multidisciplinaiy 
undergraduate experience that fully utilizes a diverse faculty and bridges the fine arts and design. Through a well-planned sequence of increasingly complex 
and in-depth studios and close work with faculty, students are able to construct optimal learning paths that meet their individual needs This degree program 
provides a sound, well-rounded visual arts education and focuses on providing students with skills that allow them to perform and succeed in a wide variety 
of art and design positions after graduation. 

While the degree is professionally non-specific, students selecting the Bachelor of Art and Design degree may wish to use it as a foundation for later 
graduate study in a specific art or design discipline. The goal of the Art and Design curriculum is to provide the structure for the creation of a new model of 

112 



art and design professional. These individuals' artistic and practical talents are developed as different expressions of one potentiality. We emphasize 
proficiency of skills in advanced visualization and interactive media in combination with a strong focus on traditional fine arts and design. 

CURRICULUM IN ART AND DESIGN 
Degree earned: Bachelor of Art and Design 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio 
ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 
History/Literature Elective 
Mathematical Sciences Elective 
Fitness & Wellness Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio 
ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 
History/Literature Elective 
Mathematical Sciences Elective 
Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Studio' 

ADN 281 Basic Drawing 

Natural Science Elective with Lab 

History of Art/Design History' 



'Is Spring Semester 

6 Studio' 

3 Design Elective' 

4 History of Art/Design History' 
3 Writing and Speaking Elective 
16 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Studio' 

Design Elective' 

Natural Science Elective with Lab 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

6 Studio' 

3 ADN 418 Contemporary Issues in Art & Design 

4 Design Elective' 

3 Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 

16 Natural Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Studio' 

ADN Art and Design: Theory and Practice'' 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 

Science/Technology/Society Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 
Studio' 

Design Elective' 
Design Elective' 
Free Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 127 

'a two-semester survey course in Art History or Design History is required by Art and Design majors. Each course will satisfy three (3) credit hours of the 

six-hour Humanities/Social Science requirement. 

^A 400-level, six-credit-hour studio is required each semester. Three of these studios must be in the Art and Design Program. The other three may be from 

other disciplines within the School of Design. No more than one studio may be taken in any semester. 

'Any three-credit-hour course in the School of Design. A list of classes/studios that students may choose from to satisfy these requirements is available from 

your advisor. Art and Design majors must distribute 18 hours of their design electives in the following way: 

• Six credit hours Muhimedia 

• Six credit hours Drawing 

• Six credit hours Art/Design History 

*ADN 418 (Contemporary Issues in Art and Design) and ADN 428 (Art and Design: Theory and Practice) are required classes for all Art and Design 
Majors. ADN 418 and ADN 428 satisfy the University requirement of major papers during the junior and senior years. 

* Art and Design majors are required to take 1 5 credit hours of classes concentrated in any one ( 1 ) of the other four (4) departments in the School of Design 

(ARC, GD, ID, LAR). In consultation with their advisors, students also have the option of taking a 15-credit hour distribution of classes of selected courses 

form the University at large. 

*The sequence of elective courses is illustrated only and not mandatory. Students may schedule elective courses in any order which supports their 

educational objectives. 

•One (1) course in the above curriculum must focus on a non-English speaking culture. (See courses marked with asterisks under List B in the "General 

Education Requirements" list). 

•Foreign Language proficiency at the 102 level is required for graduation but does not count toward the minimum credit hours. 

•Students who change majors within the School of Design are advised to check regarding the application of their general education requirements toward a 

degree in the new major. Requirements vary among departments. 

MINOR IN ART AND DESIGN (Non-Design Majors) 

The Minor in Art and Design's objectives are to discover basic design principles through hands-on activities, to apply design process and theory to solve 
problems creatively and efficiently, to increase awareness of one's self and environment, and to foster an appreciation and understanding of the disciplines of 
Art and Design. Any curious undergraduate student in the university who is not majoring in design and who seeks alternative methods of experiencing the 
environment in which we live will benefit from this minor. 



113 



The Minor in Art and Design consist of 15 credit hours of study. A student must successfully complete two prerequisite courses (ADN 1 1 1 and ADN 1 12) 
before applying for entrance into the Minor in Art and Design. These two courses provide and essential foundation in design. A Grade Point Average of 
2.75 or above and a faculty review are also required. 

After completion of ADN 1 1 1 and ADN 1 12 (6 credit hours), the student must then complete 9 hours of recommended courses selected from the courses 
listed in the information provided by the Art and Design Program Director. Six (6) hours must be above the 100 level and another three (3) hours at or above 
the 300 level. A grade of C or better will be required for credit in all courses in the Minor in Art and Design program. The course selection will be 
determined with the guidance of the student's minor advisor and tailored to the needs, interests and goals of the student. 

DEPARTMENT OF GRAPHIC DESIGN http://www.design.ncsu edu 

Brooks Hall 

Phone:(919)515-8326 

J. Spadaro, Head 

M. Davis, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: M. Davis, A. Lowrey, M. Scotford; Associate Professor: K. Bailey, A. Blauvelt, J. Spadaro, S. Townsend 

Graphic design is the process of bringing meaningful visual form to communication. Graphic designers translate communication goals through printed, 
environmental, and electronic presentations of information. Graphic designers use words and images to express messages that inform, persuade, and incite to 
action individuals and audiences. Graphic designers are active in all aspects of communication design. For example, they design books, magazines, 
newspapers, and CD-ROMS for the publishing industry. They also create printed materials such as logotypes, symbol, annual reports, newsletters, business 
forms, stationery systems, and other related literature for corporations, institutions, businesses, and governmental agencies. Graphic designers create 
multimedia presentations, web sites, graphical computer interfaces, and motion graphics such as film titling and typographic treatments for video, as well as 
on-air graphics for television. Graphic designers are employed in a variety of settings, including graphic design offices, advertising agencies, communication 
businesses, as well as corporations, institutions, or governmental agencies as part of internal communications departments. 

The Bachelor of Graphic Design program includes the study of visual, theoretical, historical, and technical aspects of the discipline. The curriculum provides 
comprehensive experiences in the analysis of communication problems, the development of creative solutions to those problems, and the implementation 
and evaluation of those solutions. Required support courses in typography explore the role of words and language in graphic communication, while courses 
in imaging provide students with experiences in a range of photographic, videographic, and motion graphic media. Instruction in computer software 
programs is fiilly integrated in design studios and support courses and is not taught as a separate activity. In their studios, graphic design majors prepare for 
careers in the field through the execution of demonstration projects of varying complexity and scale. In the last studio, graduating students prepare their 
portfolios for job searches and demonstrate their expertise in a particular area of practice. 

CURRICULUM IN GRAPHIC DESIGN 

Degree earned: Bachelor of Graphic Design 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 

Mathematical Sciences Elective 

Humanities Elective 

Fitness & Wellness Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio 

ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 

Mathematical Sciences Elective 

Humanities Elective 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

GD 201 Graphic Design Studio I 

GD 210 Imaging for Graphic Design I 

GD210L Imaging 1 Lab 

GD217TypeI 

Natural Science Elective with lab 



Credits Spring Semester 

6 GD 202 Graphic Design Studio II 

3 GD 3 10 Imaging for Graphic Design II 

GD310L Imaging II Lab 

3 GD 317 Type II 

4 GD317LTypeIILab 

16 Natural Science Elective with lab 



Credits 
6 
3 

3 

4 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

GD 301 Graphic Design Studio III 

GD 410 Imaging for Graphic Design III 

GD4I0L Imaging III Lab 

GD 417 Type III 

GD4I7 Type III Lab 

Social Sciences Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

6 GD 400 Advanced Graphic Design Studio' 

3 GD 342 History of Graphic Design 

GD 355 Graphic Design Production 

3 GD 355L Graphic Design Production Lab 

Design Elective' 

3 Social Sciences Elective 

15 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 

3 
3 
18 



114 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

GD 400 Advanced Graphic Design Studio' 

Natural Science Elective 

Writing and Speaking Elective 

Design Elective' 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Spring Semester 

GD 400* 'Advanced Graphic Design Studio 
Science/Technology/Society Elective 
Adv. Humanities/Social Science Elective 
Adv. Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 127 

'Students who major Industrial Design may elect as many as (2) six credit hour studios in another department. Declaration of intent to enroll in studios other 

than Industrial Design during any semester must be made during tlie pre-registration period prior to enrollment. No more than one studio may be lalien in 

any given semester. 

'Any course within the Department of Graphic Design or in the School of Design meets this requirement. 

•The sequence of elective courses is illusUative only and not mandatory. Students may schedule elective courses in any order which support their 

educational objectives. 

•One course in above the curriculum must focus on a non-English speaking culture. (See courses marked with asterisks under List B in the "General 

Education Requirements" list). 

•Foreign language proficiency at the 102 level is required for graduation but does not count toward the minimum credit hours. 

•Students who change majors within the School of Design are advised to check regarding the application of their general education requirements toward a 

degree in the new major. Requirements vary among departments. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN http //www design ncsuedu 

Brooks Hall 

Phone: (919)515-8322 

H. Khachatoorian. Head 

B. Laffine, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: V. M. Foote, H. Khachatoorian, G. Lewis; Professors Emeritus : A. Cooke, DR. Stuart W. Taylor; Associate Professor: B. Laffitte; Assistant 
Professor: P. Hooper. 

The Department of Industrial Design awards bachelor degrees in Industrial Design. The pedagogical core of the department aims to reinforce the foundation 
principles of design theory as applied to traditional and advanced technologies, i.e. new media, materials, and production techniques. Our curriculum 
addresses broad cultural, ecological, and societal considerations and promotes in our graduates the ability to meet the challenges of technological complexity 
through collaborative design. We emphasize the application of creative thinking and problem solving to design projects ranging from single to mass- 
produced artifacts. The areas of application span the range from traditional fine art and indusfrial design to interactive multimedia. Examples of current areas 
of study include digital imaging, interactive computer graphics, animation, illustration, fibers, product design, furniture design, ergonomics, and textile 
design. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Career opportunities for graduates of the Department of Industrial Design span the range from industrial design to new media systems. Graduates of this 
department are currently working in fields such as fiimiture design, illustration, recreational product design, toy design, exhibition design, textile design, 
fashion design, photography, film making, special effects, set design, and other areas of industrial design. 

CURRICULUM AND DEGREES 

The Department of Industrial Design awards four-year bachelor degrees in Industrial Design. Industrial design is concerned with all human aspects of 
machine-made products and their relationship to the environment. The industrial designer is responsible for human factors engineering, safety, shape, color, 
texture, maintenance, and cost Industfial designers deal with consumer, as well as industrial, products. In order to achieve these ends, designers must be 
involved in four major design and research areas: human behavior, human-machine relationships, the environment, and the product itself 

Furniture Manufacturing, Apparel Technology, and Textile Technology are concentrations offered through collaborations with the Industrial Engineering 
Furniture Manufacturing and Management Center and the College of Textiles, respectively. Areas of design investigation in the Bachelor of Industrial 
Design include furniture, textiles, housewares, appliances, transportation, tools, farm equipment medical instruments, electronics, human-computer 
interfaces, and recreational support equipment. The goal of the Industrial Design curriculum is to teach the design and development of products or systems 
and their relationship to human beings and the environment. 

The industrial design curriculum is centered around four major design and research activities: product development and design, product safety, the 
human/machine relationship, and the ecological impact of a product's life cycle. Graduates of the Bachelor of Industrial Design program have career 
opportunities in three general types of practice: corporate design offices in manufacturing companies, independent consulting offices, and governmental 
agencies. 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRUL DESIGN 
Degree earned: Bachelor of Industrial Design 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio 
ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 
Mathematical Sciences Elective 
Fitness & Wellness Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
I 
16 



Spring Semester 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio 
ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 
Social Science Elective 
Mathematical Sciences Elective 
Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



115 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 

ID 255 Contemporary Manufacturing Processes I 

ID 318 Ideation I 

GC 120 Foundation of Graphics 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 

ID 256 Contemporary Manufacturing Processes II 

ID41g Ideation II 

Natural Science Elective with lab 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
4 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 
ID 415 Microcomputer Imaging 
Natural Science Elective with lab 
Social Science Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

6 ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 

3 ID 492 Special Topics: Human Factors 

4 Writing and Speaking Elective' 
3 History/Literature Elective 

16 Social Sciences Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 

Natural Science Elective 

Philosophy/ReligionA'isual or 

Performing Arts Elective 

Adv. Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Spring Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 

Adv. Humanities/Social Science Elective 

Humanities Elective 

Science/Technology/Society Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 127 

'Students who major Industrial Design may elect as many as (2) six credit hour studios in another department. Declaration of intent to enroll in studios other 

than Industrial Design during any semester must be made during the pre-registration period prior to enrollment. No more than one studio may be taken in 

any given semester. 

'Any course within the Department of Graphic Design or in the School of Design meets this requirement. 

•The sequence of elective courses is illustrative only and not mandatory. Students may schedule elective courses in any order which support their 

educational objectives. 

*One course in above the curriculum must focus on a non-English speaking culture. (See courses marked with asterisks under List B in the "General 

Education Requirements" list). 

♦Foreign language proficiency at the 102 level is required for graduation but does not count toward the minimum credit hours. 

•Students who change majors within the School of Design are advised to check regarding the application of their general education requirements toward a 

degree in the new major. Requirements vary among departments. 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN - Apparel Technology Concentration 
Degree earned: Bachelor of Industrial Design 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DF lOI Design Fundamentals Studio 
ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 
Mathematical Sciences Elective 
Fitness & Wellness Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio 
ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 
Social Science Elective 
Mathematical Sciences Elective 
Physical Education Elective' 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio I 

ID 318 Ideation I 

Natural Science Elective with lab 

TMS 2 1 1 Introduction to Fiber Science 



Credits Spring Semester 

6 ID 400 Industrial Design Studio 

3 ID 256 Contemporary Manufacturing Processes II 

4 TT 221 Yam I 

3 History/Literature Elective 

15 ScienceH'echnology/Society Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio 

ID 415 Microcomputer Imaging 

TT251 Weaving I 

Social Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 
ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 
Writing and Speaking Elective' 
Natural Science Elective with lab 
Textile Elective* 



Credits 
6 
3 
4 
3 
16 



116 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ADN 470 Fiber and Surface Design Studio 

Philosophy/ReligionA'isual or 

Performing Arts Elective 

Textile Elective' 

Adv. Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Spring Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 

Design Elective' 

Design' or Textile Elective* 

Adv. Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 127 

'Students who major Industrial Design may elect as many as (2) six credit hour studios in another department. Declaration of intent to enroll in studios other 

than Industrial Design during any semester must be made during the pre-registration period prior to enrollment. No more than one studio may be taken in 

any given semester. 

'a course from List B is recommended to ftilfill the requirement for a major paper. If a course other than from List B fulfills this requirement, that course 

may be used, pending advisor approval. 

'Any course within the School of Design meets this requirement. 

'Apparel Technology minors may choose from the following courses to fulfill this requirement: TAM 218 (Infro. to Apparel Technology Management), 

TAM 3 1 5 (Apparel Production I), TAM 415 (Apparel Product Development), TAM 316 (Apparel Production II) 

•The sequence of elective courses is illusfrative only and not mandatory. Students may schedule elective courses in any order which support their 

educational objectives. 

*One course in above the curriculum must focus on a non-English speaking culture. (See courses marked with asterisks under List B in the "General 

Education Requirements" list). 

•Foreign language proficiency at the 102 level is required for graduation but does not count toward the minimum credit hours. 

•Students who change majors within the School of Design are advised to check regarding the application of their general education requirements toward a 

degree in the new major. Requirements vary among departments. 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN - Furniture Manufacturing Concentration 
Degree earned: Bachelor of Industrial Design 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio 
ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 
Mathematical Sciences Elective 
Fitness & Wellness Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio 
ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 
Social Science Elective 
Mathematical Sciences Elective 
Physical Education Elective^ 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
I 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio I 

ID 255 Contemporary Manufacturing Processes I 

ID 318 Ideation I 

GC 120 Foundation of Graphics 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio 

ID418 Ideation II 

Natural Science Elective 

Science/Technology/Society Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
4 
3 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio 

IE 240 Furniture Product Engineering 

IE 352 Work Analysis and Design 

History/Literature Elective 

Social Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Spring Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 

IE 24 1 Furniture Manufacturing Processes I 

IE 452 Ergonomics 

Writing and Speaking Elective^ 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio 

IE 31 1 Engineering Economic Analysis 

Natural Science Elective 

Philosophy/Religion/Visual or 

Performing Arts Elective 

Adv. Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 
ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 
History /Literature Elective 
Natural Science Elective 
Science/Technology/Society Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
4 
3 
16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 127 

'Students who major Industrial Design may elect as many as ( I ) six credit hour studio in another department. Declaration of intent to enroll in studios other 
than Industrial Design during any semester must be made during the pre-registration period prior to enrollment. No more than one studio may be taken in 
any given semester. 

117 



'a course from List B is recommended to fulfill the requirement for a major paper. If a course other than from List B fulfills this requirement, that course 

may be used, pending advisor approval. 

♦The sequence of elective courses is illustrative only and not mandatory. Students may schedule elective courses in any order which support their 

educational objectives. 

•One course in above the curriculum must focus on a non-English speaking culture. (See courses marked with asterisks under List B in the "General 

Education Requirements" list). 

♦Foreign language proficiency at the 102 level is required for graduation but does not count toward the minimum credit hours. 

♦Students who change majors within the School of Design are advised to check regarding the application of their general education requirements toward a 

degree in the new major. Requirements vary among departments. 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN - Textile Technology Concentration 
Degree earned: Bachelor oflndustrial Design 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio 
ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 
Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 
Mathematical Sciences Elective 
Fitness & Wellness Elective 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio I 

ID 318 Ideation I 

Natural Science Elective with Lab 

TMS 211 Introduction to Fiber Science 



Fall Semester 

ID 400 Industrial Design Studio 

ID 415 Microcomputer Imaging 

TT25I Weaving I 

Social Science Elective 



Fall Semester 

ADN 470 Fiber and Surface Design Studio 

Philosophy/ReligionA'isual or 

Performing Arts Elective 

Textile Elective' 

Adv. Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

6 DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio 
3 ENG 1 1 2 Composition & Reading 
3 Social Science Elective 
3 Mathematical Sciences Elective 
I Physical Education Elective^ 
16 


Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 


SOPHOMORE YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 

6 ID 400 Industrial Design Studio 

3 ID 256 Cont. Manufacturing Processes II 

4 TT 221 Yam I 

3 History/Literature Elective 

16 Science/Technology/Society Elective 


Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 

6 ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 
3 Writing and Speaking Elective^ 
3 Natural Science Elective with Lab 
3 Textile Elective* 
15 


Credits 
6 
3 
4 
3 
1« 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 

6 ID 400 Industrial Design Studio' 

Design Elective' 
3 Design' or Textile Elective* 
3 Adv. Humanities/Social Science Elective 
3 
15 


Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 127 

'Students who major Industrial Design may elect as many as (1) six credit hour studio in another department. Declaration of intent to enroll in studios other 

than Industrial Design during any semester must be made during the pre-registration period prior to enrollment. No more than one studio may be taken in 

any given semester. 

^A course from List B is recommended to fiilfill the requirement for a major paper. If a course other than from List B fulfills this requirement, that course 

may be used, pending advisor approval. 

'Any course within the School of Design meets this requirement. 

■"Apparel Technology minors may choose from the following courses to fulfill this requirement: TT 241 (Knitting I), TT 305 (Fiberweb and Nonwoven 

Production), TT 351 (Weaving Systems), TT 451 (Advanced Woven Fabric Design). 

♦The sequence of elective courses is illusfrative only and not mandatory. Students may schedule elective courses in any order which support their 

educational objectives. 

♦One course in above the curriculum must focus on a non-English speaking culture. (See courses marked with asterisks under List B in the "General 

Education Requirements" list). 

♦Foreign language proficiency at the 102 level is required for graduation but does not count toward the minimum credit hours. 

♦Students who change majors within the School of Design are advised to check regarding the application of their general education requirements toward a 

degree in the new major. Requirements vary among departments. 



118 



DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE http://www design ncsuedu 

Brooks Hall 

Phone: (919)515-8340 

A. R. Rice, Head 

A. R. Rice, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: A. R. Abbate, R. Moore, A. R. Rice; Professors Emeriti: R. E. Stipe. R. R. Wilkinson; Research Associate Professors: J. E. Pels, J. Tomlinson; 
Associate Professors: F. Magallanes, S. Raval; Assistant Professor : M. Myers, Associate Members of the Faculty: W. E. Hooker, A. R. Okigbo, M. E. Traer 
(Horticultural Science), H. Devine (Parks Recreation and Tourism Management); Adjunct Associate Professors: C. Flink, Y. Fozard, C. Roe, W. Swink, J. 
Wick, L. Zucchino 

Landscape Architecture is a multi-faceted profession dedicated to the welfare of the environment and living communities of the earth. It is a diverse and 
growing design profession that combines art, science, engineering, and technology. Landscape Architecture at the School of Design is especially concerned 
with the stewardship, restoration, and regeneration of the natural and cultural environments in urban, rural and wilderness settings. The five-year Bachelor of 
Landscape Architecture degree program provides an educational experience that develops in students the skills necessary to deal creatively and responsibly 
with the forces-human and natural-that inevitably shape the land. 

The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program stresses the development of the student's intellectual capacity through the medium of a comprehensive 
design education. The program offers an integrated, broad-based education in the discipline of Landscape Architecture program and stresses the 
development of the student's intellectual capacity through the medium of a comprehensive design education. The program offers an integrated, broad-based 
education in the discipline of Landscape Architecture and emphasizes interdisciplinary design work, national and international experience, and ecologically 
sound community-based design and planning. Students develop the ability to think, visualize, analyze, and synthesize ideas using information and skills from 
diverse fields of study. 

This professional degree program serves individuals who are interested in affecting the environment directly through the profession of landscape architecture 
or going on to earn a graduate degree in Landscape Architecture or related disciplines. In addition, the department is concerned with fostering an individual's 
sense of responsibility to society as a steward of the cultural and natural environments. Graduates of the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program have 
an understanding of the profession, its role in society, and their own potential role. Graduates offer employers and clients strong intellectual problem-solving 
abilities and the professional skills necessary to evaluate, develop, and communicate solutions to a variety of design and planning problems, including-but 
not limited to-the design of parks, trail systems, recreational environments, resorts, urban plazas, communities, and conservation plans. 



CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 
Degree earned: Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 

Mathematical Sciences Elective 

Humanities Elective 

Fitness & Wellness Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio 

ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 

Mathematical Sciences Elective 

Humanities Elective 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

LAR 400 Landscape Architecture Studio 

Advised LAR Elective' 

LAR 430 Site Planning 

LAR 430L Site Planning Lab 

BO 200 Plant Life 



Is Spring Semester 

6 LAR 400 Landscape Architecture Studio 

3 MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 

3 MEA 110 Geology I Lab 

ARC 232 Structures & Materials 

3 Advised LAR Elective' 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Required Swing Studio^ 
HS 21 1 Ornamental Plants I 
BO 360 Intro, to Ecology 
BO 365 Intro, to Ecology Lab 
LAR 221 Intro, to Env. Behavior 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
1 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

LAR 400 Landscape Architecture Studio 

HS 212 Ornamental Plants II 

Design Elective' 

LAR 457 Construction Materials & Methods 

LAR 457L Construction Materials & Methods Lab 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
3 

15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

LAR 400 Landscape Architecture Studio 
LAR 433 Native Plants & Environ. Design 
LAR 444 History of Landscape Arch 
Social Sciences Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

6 Advanced Foreign Language' 

3 Science/Technology/Society Elective 

3 Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 

3 Social Sciences Elective 

15 Adv. Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SUMMER SEMESTER 
LAR XXX* Landscape Architecture Studio' 



119 





FIFTH YEAR 


Fall Semester 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 

Design Elective' 

Adv. Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


Credits Spring Semester 

3 LAR XXX* BLA Final Project 
3 Free Elective 
3 Free Elective 


Writing and Speaking Elective 
Mathematics/Technology Elective 


3 
3 
IS 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
12 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 157 



' LAR Advised electives may be filled by any LAR-prefix courses. 

^Design (DN), Graphic Design (GD), Industrial Design (ID), Architecture (ARC), or Horticulture (HS) studios. No more than one studio may be taken in 

any given semester. 

' Any course open to School of Design majors and offered by the School of Design fulfills this requirements. 

■* Foreign language proficiency at the FL 102 level and one semester at the FL 201 level (or in a second foreign language at the FL 102 level) are required for 

graduation. 

' International, off-campus studio recommended to fulfill this required studio. 

' LAR XXX are proposed courses. Numbers will be assigned pending approval by the School of Design and University Curriculum Committees. 

•The sequence of elective courses is illustrative only and not mandatory. Students may schedule elective courses in any order which support their 

educational objectives. 

♦One course in above the curriculum must focus on a non-English speaking culture. (See courses marked with asterisks under List B in the "General 

Education Requirements" list). 

•Foreign language proficiency at the 102 level is required for graduation but does not count toward the minimum credit hours. 

•Students who change majors within the School of Design are advised to check regarding the application of their general education requirements toward a 

degree in the new major. Requirements vary among departments. 



120 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 



208 Poe Hall Phone. (919)515-223/ 

NCSU Box 7801 Fax: (919)515-5836 

Raleigh. NC 27695-7801 E-Mail: edu_psy@ncsu.edu 



J.J. Michael, Dean 

J.R. Kolb, Associate Dean/or Academic Affairs 

E.R. Gerler, Associate Dean/or Research and External Affairs 

C.H. Maidon, Director of Teacher Education 

T.C. Wall, Director of Teaching Fellows Program 

A.P. Smith, Assistant Dean for Student Services 

The College of Education and Psychology focuses on issues of human development from both psychological and educational perspectives. With emphasis 
upon the preparation of middle grades, high school, and post-secondary teachers, counselors, supervisors, administrators, and psychologists, the college 
seeks students who are dedicated to the improvement of human beings through education, research and service and who are sensitive to the complexity of 
the teaching/learning processes. The college is composed of the Departinent of Adult and Community College Education, Counselor Education, Curriculum 
and Instruction, Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, and Psychology. 

Undergraduate degree programs are offered in education general studies, health occupations education, business and marketing education, mathematics 
education, middle grades education, science education, technology education and psychology. In addition to being admitted to a curriculum, all teacher 
education candidates must meet program requirements for admission to candidacy in teacher education (including a 2.500 or higher overall grade point 
average after the sophomore year) and for admission to student teaching (including a 2.500 or higher GPA overall, in one's teaching field, and in professional 
studies). 

Five degree programs (health occupations education, technology education, business and marketing education, mathematics education, and science 
education) lead to a license to teach in grades 9-12. A program of professional preparation is provided for those students enrolled in the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences who wish to become teachers of secondary English, Social Studies, and teachers of French and Spanish, Grades K-12. The 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Education and Psychology jointly provide a program to prepare students to become secondary 
agriculture teachers. 

The College of Education and Psychology offers an undergraduate degree in middle grades teaching with concentrations eitlier in language arts/social studies 
or mathematics/science. 

Students enrolled in a natural sciences or a mathematical sciences curriculum may double-major in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and 
Technology Education and earn a license to teach in grades 6-9 or 9-12. 

Most of the college's teacher education programs are in fields of teacher shortage. Graduates have little difficulty finding teaching positions. Because of 
limited faculty resources, space in some programs is limited. 

Most of the education and psychology programs listed in the following pages also offer graduate-level degree programs. In addition, the College of 
Education and Psychology has graduate programs in: 

Adult Education Policy Analysis Occupational Education 

Counselor Education Elementary Education Reading Education 

Curriculum and Instruction Health Professions Occupations Special Education 

Educational Administration Higher Education Administration Training and Development 

Educational Research and Middle Grades Education 

See Graduate Catalog or contact faculty members for information on graduate programs. 

Public schools post-master's licensure programs are available in some curricular areas. All of the bachelor's level and graduate level licensure programs are 
approved by the North Carolina Board of Education. The college is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA), the Council for the 
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (ACREP), and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 

The College of Education and Psychology is located in Poe Hall. It includes a Learning Resources Library, a Center for Learning Technologies, and an 
Instructional Computing Facility. The building houses laboratories for technology education, reading, science, psychology, counseling and testing activities. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The College of Education and Psychology has a scholarship program distinct from the campus Merits Awards Program. Over 20 scholarships are awarded to 
undergraduates each year. 

North Carolina State University is one of 14 institutions participating in the NC Teaching Fellows Program and has over 120 teaching fellows enrolled. Each 
fellow receives SS.OOO per year for four years in exchange for a commitment to teach for four years in-state. 

Other students receive awards through the North Carolina Board of Education's Scholarship Loan Fund for Prospective Teachers and through other sources. 
High school counselors receive information about, and applications for, all of these scholarships and awards. 

SCHOLARS AND HONORS PROGRAMS 

The College of Education and Psychology participates in the University Scholars Program, in which selected students each year participate in weekly 

121 



activities that broaden and deepen their university experiences. The Psychology Department offers an optional curriculum for honors students. There is an 
honors society in psychology, one in education and one in technology education. 

INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES Several faculty members have been involved in overseas projects in China, Ghana, Japan, Peru, Puerto Rico, and 
Russia, and South Africa. Some of the foreign language teacher education students spend a year in France or Spain in an exchange program. The enrollment 
of international students in the several education and psychology programs and elsewhere atNC State also offers on-campus multi-cultural opportunities. 

DEPARTMENT OF ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION 

(See Graduate Catalog) 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

Ricks Hall, Room 13A (See College of Agriculture and Life Sciences) 
Phone: (919)515-9060 

J. L. Flowers, Coordinator of Advising 

Students desiring to become secondary Agriculture teachers in grades 9-12 should seek enrollment in the college of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Refer to 
the catalog section. Department of Agricultural Extension and Education for curriculum requirements. 

DEPARTMENT OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

Poe Hall, Room 602 
Phone:(919)515-3221 

C.L. Crossland, Head 

B.J. Fox, Director of Graduate Education 

CM. Beal, Director of Undergraduate Education 

Professors: C.L. Crossland, DA. Cullinan, B.J. Fox, P.H. Martorella, BR. Poulton; Associate Professors: PL. Marshall, T.P. O'Brien, S.S. Osborne, C.A. 
Pope, R.J. Pritchard, A.J. Reiman, E.J. Sabomie, H. A. Spires, E.S. Vasu; Assistant Professors: M. Alibrandi, CM. Beal, S.M. Butler, A.V. Wilson; Visiting 
Assistant Professor: M. Terhaar- Yonkers; Adjunct Professors: D.D. Copeland, R. A. Edelfelt; Adjunct Assistant Professors: S. B. Buckner, C.J. Messina, 
W.R. Parker; Professor Emeritus: B.M. Parramore; Associate Professor Emeritus: J.F. Arnold, L. Thies-Sprinthall. 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction prepares undergraduate students to become teachers of middle grades language arts and social studies, 
secondary marketing education, and to become leaders in health occupations. The Department currently includes a diversity of highly qualified students. All 
programs emphasize scholarship an individually designed study, and include cross-disciplinary work and field-based experiences. 

CURRICULA IN HEALTH OCCUPATIONS TEACHER EDUCATION 
Poe Hall, Room 402 

The Health Occupations Education program goal is to provide learning experiences that permit students to develop specific competencies associated with 
effective teaching and leadership roles as they relate to health care. The Bachelor of Science program prepares qualified individuals for various positions in 
hospitals, secondary schools, community colleges, and other post-secondary institutions. Some graduates seek teaching positions in their own health fields; 
others choose to teach high school health occupations education. Some work in health care delivery in area hospitals and health agencies, while others work 
in a variety of capacities in business, industry, and government. Thirty hours of equivalency credit is granted by validation of a current credential in a health 
occupations specialty recognized by the American Dental Association, American Medical Association-Committee on Allied Health Education and 
Accreditation, or National League for Nursing. 

CURRICULUM IN HEALTH OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION, LICENSURE OPTION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Health Occupations Education 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

All Health occupations students transfer into the curriculum. Generally most have 30 semester hours or more of transfer credit. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 3 

Math Elective' 3 Science Elective' 4 

Science Elective' 4 History/Literature* 3 

Writing/Speaking Elective' 3 EOE 207 Intro, to Teaching Occ. Education 3 

EOE 101 Intro, to Occ. Education 1 Math Elective' 3 

ECI 451 Improving Reading Sec. Schools 2 16 

16 



122 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Science Elective' 

Math/Science Elective' 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 

History/Literature Elective'' 

ECI 332 Health Promotion & Disease Prev. 

ED 3 10 Teaching Adolescents 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Fall Semester 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 

ECI 438 Medical Law & Ethics 

Free Elective 

PSY 376 Development Psychology or 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Dev. 

ECI 436 Evaluat. Skills of Tchng a Mth. Occ. 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
17 



Spring Semester 

ECI 333 Health Care Delivery 

Humanities/Social Science Elective" 

ECI 336 Strategies of Teaching Health Occ. 

ELP 334 School and Society 

ECI 335 Planning Classroom & Clinic 



SENIOR YEAR 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

ECI 437 Health Occ. Teach Practicum 
Humanities/Social Science Elecitve' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective?' 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Credits 
8 
3 
3 
14 



124" 



'Two courses (six semester hours) selected from mathematics, statistics, and logic; one course (3 semester hours) must be a mathematics course. 
'Three courses (1 1 semester hours) from natural sciences; two selected from biology, chemistry, earth sciences, and physics; one selected from natural 
sciences other than those previously listed. Two of these courses must have a Lab. 

'One course (3 semester hours) from advanced writing elective, communication/speech elective, or foreign language elective lists. 
*rwo courses (6 semester hours) frxjm History elective and/or literature elective. 
'One course (3 semester hours) in mathematical sciences or natural sciences electives. 

'One course (3 semester hours) from one of the following elective areas: philosophy, religion, visual and performing arts. The course must focus on non- 
English speaking culture. 

'One course (3 semester hours) from one of the following elective areas; economics, politics and government, sociology, anthropology, or cultural 
geography. 

'One course (3 semester hours) from the science, technology, and society (Humanities and Social Sciences perspectives list). 
'One course (3 semester hours) from the electives in # seven above or the Humanities and Social Sciences (additional) list. 
'"Must have demonstrated foreign language proficiency at the FL-102 level. 

CURRICULUM IN HEALTH OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION. NON-LICENSURE OPTION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Health Occupations Education 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

All Health occupations students transfer into the curriculum. Generally most have 30 semester hours or more of transfer credit. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

Math Elective' 

Science Elective' 

Writing/Speaking Elective' 

Free Elective 



Fall Semester 

Science Elective' 

Math/Science Elective' 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 

History/Literature Elective'' 

ECI 332 Health Promotion & Disease Prev. 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Fall Semester 

ECI 433 Health Occ. Specialty Practicum 

ECI 438 Medical Law & Ethics 

Free Elective 

ECI 436 Eval. Skills of Teaching a Hlth. Occ. 

Physical Fitness Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

Science Elective' 

History /Literature^ 

Free Elective 

Math Elective' 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

ECI 333 Health Care Delivery 

Humanities/Social Science Elective? 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 

ECI 336 Strategies of Teaching Health Occ. 

ECI 335 Planning Classroom & Clinic 



SENIOR YEAR 



Credits 
3 
3 
6 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

ECI 437 Health Occ. Teach Practicum 
Humanities/Social Science Elecitve' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 
ECI 434 Clinical Supervision in HOE 
Free Elective 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 
123 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



'Two courses (six semester hours) selected from mathematics, statistics, and logic; one course (3 semester hours) must be a mathematics course. 
^Three courses (11 semester hours) from natural sciences; two selected from biology, chemistry, earth sciences, and physics; one selected from natural 
sciences other than those previously listed. Two of these courses must have a Lab. 

'One course (3 semester hours) from advanced writing elective, communication/speech elective, or ft)reign language elective lists, 
■^wo courses (6 semester hours) from History elective and/or literature elective. 
'One course (3 semester hours) in mathematical sciences or natural sciences electives. 

'One course (3 semester hours) from one of the following elective areas; philosophy, religion, visual and performing arts. The course must focus on non- 
English speaking culture. 

'One course (3 semester hours) from one of the following elective areas: economics, politics and government, sociology, anthropology, or cultural 
geography. 

'One course (3 semester hours) from the science, technology, and society (Humanities and Social Sciences perspectives list). 
'One course (3 semester hours) from the electives in # seven above or the Humanities and Social Sciences (additional) list. 
'"Must have demonstrated foreign language proficiency at the FL-102 level. 

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS AND MARKETING EDUCATION 
Poe Hall, Room 402 

T. O'Brien, Coordinator 

The Business and Marketing Education curriculum is specifically designed to prepare teachers for Business and Marketing Education programs in secondary 
schools. In addition, it provides the necessary pedagogical and technical preparation needed by business and marketing instructors in community and 
technical colleges, as well as for selected training and development roles in business and industry. The combination of a broad general and professional 
education, business and marketing courses, and supervised work experience in marketing jobs provides a unique preparation for educators in a rapidly 
expanding occupational area 

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS AND MARKETING EDUCATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Business and Marketing Education 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EOE 101 Intro, to Occ. Education 
ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 
Mathematical Sciences Elective' 
100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 
Natural Science Elective^ 
Sci/Technology/Soc. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 CSC 200 Intro, to Computers 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading 

3 History Elective' 
1 Speech Elective' 

4 Physical Education Elective 
3 Natural Science Elective' 
15 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EC 201 Economics I 

EOE 207 Int. to Teach. Occ. Education** 

Literature Elective* 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology*' 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

EC 202 Economics II 

BUS 360 Marketing Methods 

Natural Science Elective' 

SOC Elective' 

Political Science Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BUS(ST) 350 Economics & Bus. Statistics 

BUS 467 Adv. and Sales Promotion* 

ELP 344 School and Society* * 

PSY 376 Human Growth and Dev., or 

PSY 476 Psy. of Adolescence 

BUS 466 Sales Mgmt* 

ED 3 1 Tutoring Adolescents 



Spring Semester 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 307 Business Law I 

BUS 330 Human Res. Mgmt. 

EOE 307 Field Work in Occ. Education 

PHI 314 Issues in Business Ethics 

BUS 468 Marketing Mgmt. and Plan* 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BUS 462 Marketing Research 

ECI 444 Adm. of Marketing Education 

ECI 446 Curr. and Methods of MICE** 

ECI 451 Reading in the Sec. School 

Economics & Bus. Elec. (300 or 400 level) 

Free Elective 



Spring Semester 

ECI 447 Student Teaching in MKE 
ECI 494 Senior Seminar in MKE 
Free Elective 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



Credits 
8 
3 
3 
14 



* Taken at Meredith College through the Cooperating Raleigh Colleges Agreement 
♦* Prerequisites to the Professional Semester 

124 



*** Must also have demonstrated foreign language proflciency at the FL_ 102 level 

NOTES: 

' Must be a mathematics course. 

^ Two from natural sciences elective list (biology, chemistry, earth sciences, and physics) and one from natural sciences elective list (other than biology, 

chemistry, earth sciences, and physics); two of the three courses must have a lab. 

' Course must be taken from the Sci./technology/and society (science and technology perspective) electives list. 

'' One must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

' Select form communications/speech elective. 

CURRICULA IN MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Middle Grades Education 

C. M. Beal, Coordinator 



LANGUAGE ARTS/SOCUL STUDIES CONCENTRATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EC! 102 Orient to Mid. Grades Education 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

HI 205 Western Civ. Since 1400 or 

HI 233 World in 20th Century 

Mathematics Elective' 

Natural Science Elective' 

Communication Elective* 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Spring Semester 
ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 
HI 251 Early American History or 
HI 252 Modem American History 
Math, Logic, or Stat. Elective" 
Natural Science Elective' 
Political Science Elective' 
Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 

3 
3 
4 
3 
1 
17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 262 English Literature II 

HI 275 Intro, to History of S & E Africa or 

HI 276 Inu-o. to History of W. Africa 

GEO 200 Prin. of Geography 

American Literature Elective* 

Natural Science Elective' 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

SOC 305 Race & Ethnic Relations 

ECI 205 Intro. Teach Humanities & Soc.Sci. 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 

American Literature Elective* 

Anthropology Elective" 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ECI 305 Prin. Teach Diverse Pop. 

ECI 415 Arts & Adolescence 

ELP 344 School and Society 

PSY 476 Psych, of Adolescent Dev. 

PEH 280 Emer. Medical Care & First Aid or 

PEH 285 Persona] Health 

Literature Elective" 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

ECI 306 Middle Grades Reading 
ECI 307 Writing Across Curriculum 
ECI 309 Teaching in Middle Grades* 
ED 310 Tutoring Adolescents** 
Sci./Technology/Soc. Elective" 
Economics Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ECI(ENG) 405 Lit. for Adolescents 

ECI 430 Meth. & Materials in Mid. Gr. LA 

ECI 435 Meth. & Materials in Mid. Gr. SS 

ENG 328 Language and Writing or 

ENG 422 Writ. Theory & Writ. Process or 

ENG210, 324, 325,326,or328 

HI 364 North Carolina History' 



Spring Semester 

ECI 416 Teach Exceptional Child 

ECI 454 Student Teach in Language Arts 

ECI 464 Student Teach Soc. Stud. 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



Credits 
3 
5 
5 
13 



126* 



'Students must demonstrate foreign language proficiency at the FL _ 102 level. 

'MA 103, 105, 1 1 1, 1 14, 121, 131, 214. MA 101 is excluded. 

"Any course from the appropriate university approved list of electives. 

'BIO 105, BO 200, CH 100, CH 101, MEA 101 or PY 131 and one additional course from the university approved natural science (basic or other) lists. 

'COM 112,202,212,312,322 

'PS 201, 202, 231, 236 

'EC 201, ARE 201 or ARE 210 

' For prospective NC certification only; others take HI elective at 300-400 level from the approved Humanities and Social Science list. 

•ENG 248, 265, 266, 283, 305, 349, 369, 448, 468. 

** Courses are offered both Fall and Spring 



125 



MATHEMATICS/SCIENCE CONCENTRATION 

K. S. Norwood, Coordinator 

Curriculum requirements for the mathematics/science concentration can be located in the Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education 
section of this catalog. 

CURRICULA IN EDUCATION, GENERAL STUDIES 

Poe Hall, Room 608 

P. A. Hessling, Coordinator of Advising 

The Education, General Studies program has two areas of emphasis. Emphasis A serves those students who are interested in those fields of education that do 
not require formal certification, such as juvenile homes, day care, and other public and private agencies. Emphasis B serves those students previously 
enrolled in teacher education programs at North Carolina State University, but whose career goals have changed. 

EDUCATION: GENERAL STUDIES 

Emphasis A: Students Preparing For Non-Certified Postions In Education 
Degree earned: B.S. in Education, General Studies 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

Mathematical Sciences 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psy. 

Fl 101 Foreign Language 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness and Wellness 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

3 Mathematical Sciences 

3 see 202 Prin. of Sociology 

3 Free Elective 

1 Humanities/Social Science Elective 

13 Physical Education Elective 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Natural Science (Basic) 

PHI 205 Problems & Types 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 

History or Lit. Elective 

Free Elective 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 Natural Science (Basic) 

3 Comm/Speech Elective 

3 Visual & Perf. Arts Elective 

3 History or Lit. Elective 

3 Education: Introductory 

1 Physical Education Elective 
17 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Natural Science (Other) 
ELP 344 School & Society 
PSY 304 Educational Psy. 
Education or Psy. Elective 
SOC 305 Racial & Ethnic Rel. 
Advanced Writing Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 Sci./Technology/Soc. Elective 

3 Education or Psy. Elective 

3 PSY 376 Developmental Psy. 

3 SOC 3 1 1 Community Relations 

3 PSY 3 1 Learning & Motivation or 

3 PSY 320 Cognitive Processes 
18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Free Elective 

ELP 496 Special Topic (EGS) 

Education or Psy. Electives 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ELP 201 Alt. Educational Agencies 

3 SOC 4 1 8 Sociology of Education 

9 Education or Psy. Electives 

IS Comm/Speech Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
6 
3 
15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



124 



EDUCATION: GENERAL STUDIES 

Emphasis B: Students Formerly In Teacher Education Programs 
Degree earned: B.S. in Education, General Studies 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

Mathematical Sciences 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psy. 

Fl 101 Foreign Language 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness and Wellness 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

3 Mathematical Sciences 

3 SOC 202 Prin. of Sociology 

3 Free Elective 

1 Humanities/Social Science Elective 

13 Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
16 



126 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Natural Science (Basic) 

PHI 205 Problems & Types 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 

History or Lit. Elective 

Free Elective 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 Natural Science (Basic) 

3 Comm/Speech Elective 

3 Visual & Perf. Arts Elective 

3 History or Lit. Elective 

3 Education: Introductory 

1 Physical Education Elective 
17 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Natural Science (Other) 
ELP 344 School & Society 
PSY 304 Educational Psy. 
Advanced Writing Elective 
Teaching Field 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 
Scl./Technology/Soc. Elective 
Education or Psy. Elective 
PSY 376 Developmental Psy. 
Supporting Elective 
Teaching Field 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Free Elective 
Supporting Elective 
Teaching Field 



Credits 
3 
3 
9 
15 



Spring Semester 

ELP 201 Alt. Educational Agencies 

Supporting Elective 

Teaching Field 



Credits 
3 
3 
9 
15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 124 



ENGLISH TEACHER EDUCATION 

L. H. MacKethan. Coordinator of Advising 



Students desiring to become secondary English teachers in grades 9-12 will be enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. In that College's 
section of this Catalog, curriculum requirements for the teacher education option can be found under the Department of English. Students desiring to become 
language arts teachers in grades 6-9 will be enrolled in the College of Education and Psychology. For details, consult the Middle Grades Education 
description. 

FRENCH TEACHER EDUCATION 

Students desiring to become teachers of French will be enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. In that College's section of this Catalog, 
curriculum requirements for the teacher education option in French can be found under Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE ANDTECHNOLOGY EDUCATION www2.ncsu edu/cep/mathsci/msthomepage 

Poe Hall, Room 326 
Phone: (919)515-2238 

J.E. Penick, Head 

J.H. Wheatley, Associate Head 

W.M. Waters, Director of Graduate Programs for Mathematics Education 

DA. Adams. Director of Graduate Programs for Occupational Education 

S.L. Westbrook, Director of Graduate Programs for Science Education 

RE. Wenig, Director of Graduate Programs for Technology Education 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: JR. Kolb, J.C. Park, L.W. WaXson; Professors: L.M. Clark, JR. Kolb: Professors Emeriti: N.D. 
Anderson. H.E. Speece; Associate Professors: V.W. DeLuca, W.J. Haynie III, K.S. Norwood. J.C. Park, RE. Peterson, L.V. Stiff. W.M. Waters Jr., L.W. 
Watson, RE. Wenig, S.L. Westbrook, J.H. VJheat\ey: Associate Professor Emeritus: HA. Shannon: Research Associate Professor: H.S. Slubbs; Assistant 
Professors: T.J. Branoff, OS. Carter, A. Clark, E.N. Wiebe: Assistant Professor Emeritus: J.L. Crow, W.J. Vanderwall; Visiting Assistant Professor: K..R. 
Dawkins; Instructors: B. Mattews, AY. Scales; Lecturer: J.F. Freeman, E.N. Wiebe; Lecturers Emeriti: O.K. Hillard, B.D. Webb; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: R.R. Jones, J.A. Lutz, CM. Meek, J.J. Mintzes, W.E. Spooner, L.M. Stroud. 

The Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education prepares undergraduate students to become teachers of mathematics, science and 
technology. The department traditionally prepares competent professionals who have strong subject-matter backgrounds and pedagogical skills. 
Departmental majors may seek licensure for teaching high school grades 9-12 or middle school grades 6-9. Students in the high school curriculum in 
mathematics education or science education take approximately 45 percent of their program in science and mathematics and may complete a double major, 
receiving a second degree in mathematics or one of the sciences. Students in Technology Education may be licensed as teachers of technology programs in 
middle grades and high schools. All pre-service teaching programs provide a broad background; an in-depth study in mathematics, technology or an area of 
science; and the development of professional competencies. 

In addition, the technology education curriculum provides a non-teaching option with a general technical background for a variety of employment 
opportunities in business and industry. A minor in Technology Education is available. The department also offers a minor in Graphic Communications in 
which the student develops proficiency in applying graphic techniques in both career and leisure activities. 



127 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

The Speece Scholarship is awarded annually to as many as three outstanding juniors or seniors in either mathematics education or science education. The 
department sponsors two undergraduate organizations: the Mathematics and Science Education Club and the Technology Education Collegiate Association. 
Annual awards are given to the outstanding seniors in Mathematics Education (9-12), Science Education (9-12), Technology Education (6-12), and Middle 
Grades Education (6-9) in mathematics and in science. Technology education students are eligible for the Epsilon Pi Tau Leadership Award. 

CURRICULA IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 
Degree Earned: B.S. in Mathematics Education 

Foe Hall, Room 326 
L. V. Stiff, Coordinator 

CURRICULUM IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

Mathematics Education Grades 9-12 Licensure 



REQUIREMENTS 

General Studies (54-57 semester hours) 

English and Communication Courses 
ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 
ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading 
Communication Elective (COM 110, 1 12, or 211) 

Science Courses 
Physical Science' 
Natural Science Elective 

Physical Education and Free Eleclives 
Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 
Physical Education Elective 
Free Electives 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
9 



3-4 
11-12 

1 

1 

6-9 

8-11 



Humanities and Social Science Courses 
History Elective''^ 

Humanities Electives/Soc.Sci. Elective''^ 
Literature Elective''^ 
Social Electives'" 

Phil., Relig., Vis/Perf. Arts Electives' ^ 
Psy 304 Educational Psychology 
Sci./Technology/Soc. Elective^ 
Multicultural Elective^ ' 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
24 



Teaching Major (43-46 semester hours) 

Core Courses (required of alt students) 
E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environment 
CSC 112 or 1 14 Intro, to Computing 
MA 141 Analytic Geom. and Calculus I 
MA 241 Analytic Geom. and Calculus II 
MA 242 Analytic Geom. and Calculus III 
MA 403 Intro, to Modem Algebra 
MA 408 Foundation of Euclidean Geom. 
LOG 201 Logic 
ST 101 Statistics by Example 

Specializations (choose one of these) 

Mathematics 

MA 225 Structure of Real Number System 

MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations I 

MA 405 Intro, to Linear Algebra and Matrices 

MA 433 History of Mathematics 

Math Elective' 



Statistics 

MA 225 Foundations of Advanced Mathematics 

MA 305 Elementary Linear Algebra or 

MA 405 Intro, to Linear Algebra and Matrices 

ST 301 Statistical Methods I 

ST 302 Statistical Methods II 

ST 421 Intro, to Mathematical Statistics I 

ST 422 Intro, to Mathematical Statistics II 

Computer Science 

MA 225 Structure of Real Number System or 

CSC 222 Applied Discrete Mathematics 

CSC 210 Programming Concepts 

CSC 3 1 1 Data Structures 

MA 305 Elementary Linear Algebra or 

MA 405 Intro, to Linear Algebra and Matrices 

CSC Elective 



Professional Studies (required of all students)(30 hours) 

ECI 416 Tchng Excep. Children Mnstrmed Classrms 3 

ED 3 1 Tutoring Adolescents I 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

EMS 101 Orientation to Mathematics and Sci. Ed. 

EMS 203 Intro, to Teaching Mathematics and Science 3 



EMS 470 Methods and Materials with Microcomputers' 
EMS 471 Student Teaching in Mathematics' 
EMS 472 Teaching Mathematics Topics in Senior High' 
EMS 480 Teaching Mathematics with Microcomputers 
PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Dev. 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 

' Must be chosen from the university's official lists for humanities and social sciences 

' At least one of the indicated course must be chosen from the university's non-English speaking cultures' list 

' Social science elective can not be a Psychology course 

* Must be chosen from the University's Sci./Technology/Soc. Elective list 

(humanities and social sciences perspective) 

' Chosen from ANT 252, COM/ANT/HSS 392, SOC 305, or ECI 305 

' Must choose one of the following two-course sequences: CH 101/102 CH 201/202, or PY 205-208 or PY 21 1-2I2 

' Must be a course at 200-level or above or MA 105 

' These courses are taken together as a block in the fall semester. Student teaching is full-time for ten weeks. 



128 



CURRICULUM IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

Middle School Mathematics (With Science) Grades 6-9 Licensure 

K. S. Norwood. Coordinator 

REQUIREMENTS 

General Studies (56-57 semester hours) Credits 

English and Communicalion Courses 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading 3 

COM IIOorCOM ll2orCOM2n 3 

9 

Physical Education and Free Electives 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 1 

Physical Education Elective 1 
PEH 280 Emergency Medical Care and First Aid or 

PEH 285 Personal Health 2 

Free Electives 4 



Teaching Major (36 semester hours) 

CH 100 or CH 101/102 Chemistry/Lab 4 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers and Their Uses 3 

MA 105 Mathematics of Finance 3 

MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math with Applications 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geom.& Calculus I 4 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 4 

MA 225 Foundations of Advanced Mathematics 3 

MA 308 College Geom. 3 

MA 433 History of Mathematics 3 

ME A 1 30 Weather or PY 1 23 Astronomy 3 

Statistics Elective 3 

36 



Humanities and Social Sciences Course 
History Elective''^ 

Humanities/Social Science Electives''^ 
Literature Elective'^ 
Social Science Elective'^ ' 
Phil., Relig., Vis/Perf.Arts Elective' ' 
Psy 304 Educational Psychology 
Sci./Technology/Soc. Elective'' 
Multicultural Elective^ ' 

Science Courses 

PY 131 Conceptual Physics 

BIO 125 General Biology 

MEA 101/110 Physical Geology and Lab 



Proressional Studies (39 semester hours) 

ECI 306 Middle Years Reading 

ECI 309 Teaching in the Middle Years 

ECI 416 Tchng Excep Students in Mainstreamed Classrm 

ED 3 1 Tutoring Adolescents 

ELP 344 School and Society 

EMS 101 Orientation to Math and Science Education 

EMS 203 Intro, to Teaching Mathematics and Science 

EMS 470 Methods & Materials for Tchng Mathematics' 

EMS 471 Student Teaching in Mathematics* 

EMS 474 Teaching Math Topics in the Middle Grades' 

EMS 480 Teaching Mathematics with Microcomputers 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Dev. 



3 
6 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
27 

4 

4 

3-4 

11-12 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation': 



' Must be chosen from the university's list of approved humanities and social sciences 

^ At least one of the indicated courses must be chosen from the non-English speaking cultures list 

' Social science elective may not be a psychology course 

' Must be chosen from the Sci./Technology/Soc. Elective list (humanities and social sciences perspective) 

' Chosen from ANT 252. COM/ANT/HSS 392, SOC 305, ECI 305 

' Chosen from basic natural sciences elective list. At least two of the three science courses must have a lab 

^ Chosen from additional natural sciences elective list 

' Taken together as a block in the fall only. Student teaching is fiill-time for ten weeks. 

'student must meet University requirements for foreign language 

CURRICULA IN SCIENCE EDUCATION 
Degree Earned: B.S. in Science Education 
Poe Hall, Room 326 

G. S. Carter, Coordinator 

SCIENCE EDUCATION GRADES 9-12 LICENSURE 



REQUIREMENTS 

General Studies (35-40 semester hours) 

English and Communicalion Courses 
ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 
ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading 
COM 1 10 Public Speaking 

Physical Education and Free Electives 
Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 
Physical Education Elective 
Free Electives 



Humanities and Social Sciences Courses 
3 History Elective'^ 

3 Literature Elective" 

3 Phil., Relig.. Vis/Perf. Arts Elective' ^ 

9 Social Science Elective" ' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective" 
1 PSY 304 Educational Psychology 

I Sci/Technology/Soc. Elective' 

0-5 Multicultural Elective' 

2-7 



129 



Specialization (52-67 semester hours) 
Biology (59-62) 

Specialization Courses 

BO 200 Plant Life 

BO 360 Intro, to Ecology 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 

BIO 125 General Biology 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN 41 1 Prin. of Genetics 

MB 351 General Microbiology or 

BCH 451 Introductory Biochemistry 

ZO 201 General Zoology 

ZO (BO) 414 Cell Biology or 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 



Chemistry (62-64) 

Specialization Courses 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 

CH 331 Intro. Physical Chemistry 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry I 

BCH, 45 1 Introductory Biochemistry 

Chemistry Elective 



4 
3 
1 
4 
3-4 

3-4 
4 



3 

25-27 



Supporting Courses 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

MA 131 Calc. for Life & Mgmt. Sciences A or 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus 

MA 23 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus B or 

ST 31 1 Intro, to Statistics 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 

MEA 110 Geology I: Lab 

PY211 College Physics I 

PY 212 College Physics II 

Earth Science Elective 



Supporting Courses 

BIO 125 General Biology 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. and Calculus II 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 

MEA 110 Geology I: Lab 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

Biological Science Elective 

Earth Science Elective 



3 
3 

4 

4 

3-4 

33-34 



4 

4 

4 

3 

1 

4 

4 

3-4 

3-4 

30-32 



Earth Sciences 

Specialization Courses 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 

MEA 1 10 Geology LLab 

MEA 102 Geology ILHistorical 

MEA 111 Geology II: Lab 

MEA 130 Intro, to Weather & Climate or 

MEA 31 1 Physical Climatology 

MEA 200 Intro, to Ocenaography 

MEA 410 Intro, to Geologic Materials 

MEA 451 Structural Geology 

PY 123 Astronomy 

Earth Science Electives 



Supporting Courses 

BIO 125 General Biology 4 

3 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 3 

1 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 1 

3 CH 201 Chemistry- A Quantitative Science 3 

1 CH 202 Quantitative ChemisUy Lab 1 

MA 131 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Science A or 

3 MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 3/4 

3 MA 23 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus B or 

4 MA 24 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 3-4 
4 PY 211 College Phyicsl 4 
3 PY 212 College Physics II 4 

6-8 Biological Science Elective 3-4 

31-33 29-32 



Physics (64-67) 

Specialization Courses 

PY 201 University Physics I or 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scientists I 4 

PY 202 University Physics II or 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Scientists II 4 

PY 203 University Physics III or 

PY 407 Intro, to Modem Physics 3-4 

PY 123 Astronomy 3 

Physics Electives 16-17 

(Recommended: PY 228, PY 4 1 1 , PY 4 1 3, 30-32 

PY4I4,andPY452) 



Professional Studies (29 semester hours) 
(required of all students) 

ECI 4 1 6 Tchng Excep Students Mainstrmed Clssrm 3 

ED 3 1 Tutoring Adolescents 1 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

EMS 101 Orientation to Math and Science Education 

EMS 203 Intro, to Teaching Mathematics and Science 3 

EMS 475 Methods of Teaching Science' 3 



Supporting Courses 

BIO 125 General Biology 4 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 3 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 1 

CH 201 ChemisU7 - A Quantitative Science 3 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 1 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 4 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 4 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 4 

MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 3 

MEA 101 Geology LPhysical 3 

MEA 1 10 Geology LLab 1 

Biological Science Elective 3-4 

34-35 



EMS 476 Student Teaching in Science' 8 

EMS 477 Instructional Materials in Science' 3 

EMS 495 Senior Seminar in Math & Science Education' 2 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Dev. 3 

29 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128 



'Must be chosen from the university's list for approved humanities and social sciences courses. 
^At least one of the indicated courses must be chosen from the Non-English speaking cultures list. 
'Social Science elective cannot be a Psychology course. 
'Chosen from HI 321, HI 322, HI 341, HI 480, HI 481, PHI 340, MDS 301. 
'Chosen from ANT 252, COM/ANT/HSS 392, SOC 305, ECI 305. 
'Taken together as a block in the Fall only. Student teaching is full-time for 10 weeks. 

130 



MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE (WITH MATHEMATICS): 
GRADES 6-9 LICENSURE 



J. C. Park, Coordinator 

REQUIREMENTS 

General Studies (55 semester hours) 

English and Communication Courses 
ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 
ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading 
COM 110 Public Speaking 



Mathematics Courses 

MA 131 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Science A or 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. and Calculus 1 
MA 23 1 Analytic Geom. and Calculus B or 
MA 241 Analytic Geom. and Calculus II 

Physical Education 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 

Physical Education Elective 

PEH 280 Responding to Emergencies or 

PEH 285 Personal Health 

Teaching Major (38 semester hours) 

BO 200 Plant Life or ZO 201 General Zoology 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Mathematics 

MA 225 Foundations of Advanced Mathematics 

MA 308 College Geom. 

MEA 101 Geology 1: Physical 

MEA 1 10 Geology Lab 

BO 360/365 Ecology/Lab 

PY 131 Conceptual Physics 

PY 123 Astronomy 

MEA 130/131 Weather & Climate/Lab 

ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 

Science Elective 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
9 



3-4 
6-8 

1 
1 

2 
4 

4 
4 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 

3-4 
4 
3 

3-4 

3 

2 

47-49 



Humanities and Social Sciences Courses 

Literature Elective'^ 

History Elective' ' 

Phil., Relig., Vis/Perf Arts Elective'^ 

Humanities/Social Science Elective'^ 

Sci./Tech/Soc. Elective(HI 321, 322. 341, 480, 481; PHI 

340;MDS301) 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 

Multicultural Elective=(ANT 252, COM/ANT/HSS 392, 

SOC 305, ECI 305) 

Social Science Elective''^ ' 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 
3 

3 
24 



Professional Studies (35 semester hours) 

ECI 306 Middle Years Reading 

ECI 309 Teaching in the Middle Years 

ECI 416 Teaching Excep Students Mainstreamed Classrm 

ED 310 Tutoring Adolescence 

ELP 344 School and Society 

EMS 101 Orientation to Math and Science Education 

EMS 203 Intro, to Teaching Mathematics and Science 

EMS 475 Methods of Teaching Science 

EMS 476 Student Teaching in Science 

EMS 477 Instructional Materials in Science 

EMS 495 Senior Seminar in Math and Science Education 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Dev. 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



'Must be chosen from the university's list for approved course in this area. 

'At least one of the indicated courses must be chosen from the Non-English speaking cultures. 

'Cannot be a psychology course. 

CURRICULA IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 
Degree Earned: B.S. in Technology Education 

502 Poe Hall 

W. J. Haynie III, Coordinator 

LICENSURE OPTION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



128 



Fall Semester 

EOE 101 Intro, to Occ. Education 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 

GC 120 Foundations of Graphic Comm. 

Math Elective 

TED 1 1 5 Wood Processing 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
I 
3 
3 
3 
4 
I 
15 



Spring Semester 

ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading 

Math.. Statistics, or Logic' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^' 

Natural Sciences-Basic' 

TED 122 Metal Technology 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 

3-4 

4 

15-16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EOE 207 Intro, to Teaching Occ. Education 

GC 200 Applied Computer Aided Drawing 

Natural Science-Basic' 

Speech Elective' 

TED 246 Graphic Arts Technology 



Credits 
3 
3 

3-4 

3 

3 

lS-16 



Spring Semester 

Humanities/Social Science Elective'* 

Literature Elective' 

Natural Science Elective' 

TED 221 Construction Technology 

Physical Education Elective 

131 



Credits 
3 
3 

3-4 

3 

1 

13-14 



Fall Semester 

ED 3 1 Tutoring Adolescents 

ELP 344 School and Society 

Math, Natural Science, or STS Elective 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology^ 

TED 359 Electrical Technology I 

TED 376 Transportation:Enrgy & Pwr Tchnlgy 



Fall Semester 

Econ., Soc, Pol & Gov, Anth, or Cult Geog' 

ECI 45 1 Improving Rdng in Secondary Schools 

EOE 456 Curr. & Methods in Technology Ed. 

TED 430 Mfg. Technology 

Free Electives 



J 


[UNIOR YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


1 


History Elective^ 


3 


3 


PSY 376 Developmental Psychology^ 


3 


3 


TED 461 Comm. Technology 


3 


3 


TED 384 Computer Applications in Industry 


3 


3 


Free Elective 


3 


3 




15 


16 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credits 


Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 


EOE 452 Lab Planning in Technology Education 


3 


2 


EOE 457 Student Teaching in Technology Ed. 


g 


3 


EOE 495 Senior Seminar in Technology Ed. 


3 


3 
6 




14 


17 







Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



121' 



Notes: 

I. From approved list of Mathematics, Statistics, and Logic courses. 

2. Part of the Second Academic Concentration-Multidisciplinary Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences (code 4903). 

3.Three courses (II credits) from natural sciences including two from different basic sciences (biology, chemistry, earth sciences, or physics-see approved 

list). Two of these three courses must have a lab. 

4.Must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

5.0ne of these courses must be selected from either the STS-Humanities and Social Science Perspective List or the STS-Science and Technology 

Perspective List. 

6.Foreign language proficiency at the FL 102 level or above must be demonstrated prior to graduation. 



NON-LICENSURE OPTION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EOE 101 Intro, to Occ. Education 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 

GC 120 Foundations of Graphic Comm. 

Math Elective 

TED 115 Wood Processing 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Fall Semester 

EOE 207 Intro, to Teaching Occ. Education 

GC 200 Applied Computer Aided Drawing 

Natural Science-Basic^ 

Adv Writing, Comm/Speech, or Adv FL 

TED 246 Graphic Arts Technology 



Fall Semester 

EC 201 Prin. of Microeconomics 

ELP 344 School and Society 

Math, Natural Science, or STS Elective 

Psychology Elective 

TED 359 Electrical Technology I 

TED 376 Transportation:Enrgy & Pwr Tchnlgy 



Credits 
1 
3 
3 
3 
4 
1 
15 



Credits 
3 
3 

3-4 

3 

3 

15-16 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading 

Math., Statistics, or Logic' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective* 

Natural Sciences-Basic^ 

TED 122 Metal Technology 

Physical Education Elective 


Credits 
3 
3 
3 

3-4 

4 

1 

17-18 


)REYEAR 




Spring Semester 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 
History or Literature Elective 
Natural Science Elective^ 
TED 221 Construction Technology 
Free Elective' 


Credits 
3 
3 

3-t 

3 

3 

15-16 


I YEAR 




Spring Semester 

History or Literature Elective 

Psychology Elective 

TED 461 Comm. Technology 

TED 384 Computer Applications in Industry 

BUS 360 Marketing Methods 


Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

TED 430 Mfg. Technology 

Economics or Business Elective 

Advised Technical Elective* 

Free Elective 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

EOE 452 Lab Planning in Technology Ed. 

EOE 307 Field Work in OED 

EOE 495 Senior Seminar in Technology Ed. 



Credits 
3 
6 
3 
12 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 122' 



132 



Notes: 

From approved list of Mathematics, Statistics, and Logic courses. 

Three courses (1 1 credits) from natural sciences including two from different basic sciences (biology, chemistry, earth sciences, or physics-see approved 

ist). Two of these three courses must have a lab. 

Must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

From TED, GC, MA, Sciences, Design, or Engineering. 

'One of these courses must be selected from either the STS-Humanities and Social Science Perspective List or the STS-Science and Technology Perspective 

List. 

'Foreign language proficiency at the FL 102 level or above must be demonstrated prior to graduation. 

MINOR IN GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 

Poe Hall, Room 510 
Phone: (919)515-1754 

A. Y. Scales, Coordinator 

This 15 hour minor develops competencies in selecting and applying graphic techniques in both career and leisure activities, provides in-depth manual and 
computer skills, and enriches visual perception and critical thought in graphic areas. Minor programs are individually designed to meet the needs of the 
student's major, such as in engineering or technology education. 

SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER EDUCATION 

528 Poe, Box 7801 
Phone: (919)515-9655 

K. A. Troost, Coordinator of Advising. Sociology 

G. Surh, Coordinator of Advising, History 

K. Vickery, Coordinator of Advising 

i. H. Gilbert, Coordinator of Advising. Political Science 

Students desiring to become secondary social studies teachers in grades 9-12 will be enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Curriculum 
requirements for the teacher education options can be found under history, political science and public administration, and sociology and anthropology in 
that College's section. Students desiring to become social studies teachers in grades 6-9 will be enrolled in the College of Education and Psychology. 

SPANISH TEACHER EDUCATION 

L. Salstad, Coordinator of Advising 

Students desiring to become teachers of Spanish will be enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The curriculum requirements for the 
teacher education option is Spanish can be found under Foreign Languages and Literatures in that College's section. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY www2.ncsu.edu/ncsu/cep/Psychology/Psychology.html 

Poe Hall, Room 640 
Phone: (919)515-2251 

D.W. Martin, Head and Coordinator of Advising 
S. S. Snyder, Associate Head 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: K.W. Klein, D.H. Mershon, S.S. SnyderJ'rofessors: J.W. Cunningham, D.W. Drewes, W.P. Erchul, D.O. 
Gray, T.M. Hess, J.W. Kalat, T.E. LeVere, J.E.R. Luginbuhl, R.W. Nacoste, D.W. Martin, D.H.Mershon, J.J. Michael, S.E. Newman, F.J. Smith, B.W. 
Westbrook; Adjunct Professors: J.L. Howard, W. Tomow, L.G. Tomatsky; Professors Emeriti: K.L.Barkely, J.C. Johnson, H.G.Miller, P.W. Thayer, 
Associate Professors: L.E. Baker-Ward, C.C.Brookins, S.A. Converse, AG. Halberstaldt, P.F. Horan, M.E. Haskett, K.W. Klein, S.B.Pond, AC. Shulte, 
MA. Wilson, M.S. Wogalter; Adjunct Associate Professors: B.A. Braddy-Burrus, B.F. Corder, AD. \\2\\; Associate Professors Emeriti: J.L. Cole, R.F. 
Rawls; Clinical Assistant Professors: M.Y. Bingham, P.W. CoWins; Adjunct Assistant Professors: B.H. Beith, J.W. Fleenor, C.L. Kronberg, C.E. Lorenz, 
S.N. Palmer, B.H. Rogers; Associate Members of the Faculty: CD. Korte (Multidisciplinary Studies), R.G. Pearson (Industrial Engineering), J.L.Wasik 
(Statistics). 

Psychology is one of the basic majors in liberal arts and sciences. Psychologists use the methodology of science to study human behavior and experience. A 
bachelor's degree in psychology forms an excellent foundation for careers in business and government, as well as enhancing life skills such as parenting and 
human social interaction. Students can also use this degree as an entry into further education leading to an advanced degree in applied or experimental 
psychology, or to such fields as law, medicine, business or social work. 

There are two programs for undergraduate majors in psychology: The General Option (PSY) and Human Resource Development (HRD). Each emphasizes 
different aspects of psychology. Separate descriptions of these programs are included in the next section. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 

Within the General Option and the Human Resource Option, there are honors tracks which provide special curricula and opportunities to work with faculty 
on research projects. Students must have completed a minimum of 45 semester hours of course work (at least 1 5 at NC State) and have a grade point average 
of 3.250 or better to be considered for admission to an honors program. More details as to admission and requirements are available from the Psychology 
Department. 

All undergraduate majors are members of the Psychology Club, which provides a number of enrichment activities, including sponsorship of the Carolinas 
Psychology Conference. One of the largest undergraduate conferences in the United States, it is held annually in cooperation with Meredith College and 
other Cooperating Raleigh Colleges. There is also an active chapter of Psi Chi, the national psychology honor society, which provides enrichment to the 
program. 

133 



CURRICULUM IN PSYCHOLOGY - GENERAL OPTION 

The General Option is oriented toward the student who wants a broad understanding of the types of problems with which psychology is concerned and the 
ways in which psychologists approach and attempt to solve these problems. Curriculum requirements in the General Option are sufficiently flexible for 
students to concentrate, if they wish, in another area of study as well as psychology, and thereby prepare themselves for a variety of careers or professional 
programs. By wise choice of elective courses, a student can prepare for medical, legal, business, or education graduate training, while at the same time 
acquiring a basic background in the social sciences. 

CURRICULUM IN PSYCHOLOGY, GENERAL OPTION 
Degree Earned: B.A. in Psychology 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 105/106 Biology in Modem World 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psychology 

Mathematics Elective' 

Any lOO-level PE course in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 ENG 1 1 2 Comp. & Reading 

3 Social Science Elective^ 

3 Natural Science Elective' 

4 Philosophy Elective* 

1 Physical Education Elective 

15 Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 

iA 

3 

1 

3 

16-17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PSY 240 Intro, to Behavioral Research I 

PSY 241 Intro, to Behavioral Res. I Lab 

Humanities/Social Science Elective* 

Literature Elective' 

Mathematics Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CSC 200 Intro, to Computers & Their Uses 

1 PSY 242 Intro, to Behavioral Research II 

3 PSY 243 Intro, to Behavioral Res.II Lab 

3 Humanities/Social Science Elective* 

3-4 Natural Science Elective' 

13-14 Philosophy Elective (restricted)' 



Credits 
3 
3 
2 
3 

3^ 

3 

17-18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PSY Elective' 

PSY-Group 1' 

Restricted Elective'" 

Speech or Technical Writing Elective" 

Sci./Technology/Soc. Elective'^ 



Spring Semester 
PSY-Group 1' 
PSY-Group 2" 
Literature Elective' 
Restricted Elective" 
Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
PSY-Group 2" 
PSY Elective' 
Restricted Elective" 
Free Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 PSY-Group 2" 

3 Restricted Elective'" 

6 Free Electives 
3 
IS 



Credits 
3 
3 

6-9 
12-15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



122 



'Any two MA prefix courses from the approved GER Mathematics Electives list. 

-Taken from approved GER lists of Electives in Economics, Politics and Government, Sociology, Anthropology, or Cultural Geography. This course or one 
of the two Humanities or Social Science Electives must focus on a non-English speaking culture (see Footnote 5). 

'Two courses (at least one of which is NOT a biological science) from the GER Natural Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physics) List. At least 
one of these must include a lab experience. GN 301, GN 41 1, MB 200, and ZO(MEA) 220 are considered biological sciences that meet this requirement, 
^aken from the approved GER Philosophy Electives list. 

'Taken from the GER Electives lists in Cultural Geography, Economics. History, Politics and Government, Sociology, or Anthropology, or from the 
approved subset of the Humanities and Social Sciences Additional Electives List. One of these courses or the Social Science Elective must focus on a non- 
English speaking culture (see Footnote 2). 
'Taken from the approved GER Literature Electives list. 
'Taken from LOG 20l,or PHI 31 1. 332, 335 or 340, or CSC(MA)222. 
'Any course taught in the Psychology Department. 
'Taken from PSY 400, 410, 420, 430, 591. 

'"Chosen in consultation with Advisor from list of Psychology Department Approved Restricted Electives. 
"Taken from ENG 331, 332, 333 or COM 110, 112, 201, or 202. 

'^Taken from approved GER Science, Technology, and Soc. (Science and Technology Perspective) list. 

"Group 2 Psychology Electives are three courses, one course from three of the following five categories: I. PSY 307 or 340; II. PSY 376, 475, or 476; III. 
PSY 370, 470; IV. PSY 3 1 1 or 3 12; V. PSY 436. 



134 



MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

The Departments of Psychology, and Philosophy and Religion offer an interdisciplinary minor in cognitive science. The minor provides a general 
introduction to contemporary interdisciplinary research within the framework of the "computer model" mind, and offers the student the opportunity for in- 
depth study of selected topics of such as the nature of human information processing, the acquisition and use of lamachine intelligence. 

To complete the minor, 15 hours are required, distributed as follows: PSY 320 (Cognitive Processes); PSY 340 (Ergonomics) or PSY 744 (Human 
Information Processing); PHI 331 (Philosophy of Language); PHI 332 (Philosophy of Psychology); PHl/PSY 425/525 (Introduction to Cognitive Science). 

MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The Psychology Department offers a minor in psychology to majors in any field except psychology. To complete the minor, eighteen hours of courses are 
required, six of these hours in the basic science of psychology, and nine in the applied aspects of psychology. PSY 200 is a required prerequisite. All must be 
passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

CIRRICULUM IN PSYCHOLOGY 
HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

The Human Resource Development (HRD) Option is designed to provide a groundwork of skills and experience for students who wish to enter human 
service careers with a B.A. degree. With appropriate curriculum modifications, the program can also provide a sound background for students who wish to 
go into advanced degree programs in psychology, management, personnel, social work, counseling, guidance, education, and other areas. Students interested 
in graduate school should confer with their advisors in order to plan an appropriate course of study. 

The HRD Option focuses on enabling students to gain direct experience in the areas in which they would like to work. HRD students devote a semester to 
learning principles and skills related to working with human problems, and subsequently each HRD student spends a semester working part-time or fiill-time 
in a job related to his/her own area of interest. The HRD Option accepts a maximum of 20 students each year. Interested students already in the general 
option can apply for admissions to HRD during the spring semester of their sophomore or junior year. Further information about the HRD option is available 
through the Psychology Department office. 

CURRICULUM IN PSYCHOLOGY, HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT OPTION 
Degree Earned: B.A. in Psychology 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 105/106 Biology in Modem World 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psychology 

Mathematics Elective' 

Any 100-level PE course in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

3 Social Science Elective' 

3 Natural Science Elective' 

4 Philosophy Elective'' 

I Physical Education Elective 

15 Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 

3-4 
3 

3 
16-17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PSY 240 Intro, to Behavioral Research I 

PSY 241 Intro, to Behavioral Res. I Lab 

Humanities/Social Science Elective* 

Literature Elective' 

Mathematics Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CSC 200 Intro, to Computers & Their Uses 

1 PSY 242 Intro, to Behavioral Research II 

3 PSY 243 Intro, to Behavioral Res.II Lab 

3 Humanities/Social Science Elective* 

3-4 Natural Science Elective' 

13-14 Philosophy Elective (restricted)' 
Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
2 
3 

3^ 

3 

1 

17-18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PSY 350 Human Res. Dev. Skills 

PSY 495 HR Dev. Practicum 

Restricted Elective' 

Speech or Technical Writing Elective" 

SciTTechnology/Soc.Elective" 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

PSY 495 HR Dev. Practicum 

PSY 499 Indep. Study in Psy. 

Literature Elective' 

COM 1 12 Interpersonal Comm. 

PSY 312 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
PSY Electives' 
Restricted Electives' 
Free Elective 



Credits 
6 
6 
3 
15 



Spring Semsester 
PSY Elective' 
Free Electives 



Credits 
3 
9 
12 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 122 

'Any two MA prefix courses from the approved GER Mathematics Electives list. 

'Taken from approved GER list of Economics, History, Politics and Government, Sociology. Anthropology, or Cultural Geography. This course or one of 
the two Humanities or Social Science courses must focus on a non-English speaking culture (see Footnotes). 

'Two courses(at least one of which is not a biological science) from the GER Natural Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, and Physics) list. At 
least one of these must include a lab experience. GN30 1 , GN 4 1 1 , MB 200, and ZO(MEA)220 are also accepted and are considered a biological science in 

135 



meeting this requirement. 

* Taken from the approved GER Philosophy Electives list. 

'Taken from GER Electives lists in Economics, History, Politics and Government, Sociology, or Anthropology, or from the approved subset of the 

Humanities and Social Sciences Additional List. One of these courses or the Social Science Elective must focus on a non-English speaking culture (see 

Footnote 2) 

' Taken from the approved GER Literature Electives list. 

'Taken from LOG 201, or PHI 31 1, 321, 332, 335, 340 or CSC(MA)222. 

*Any course taught in the Psychology Department. 

'Chosen in consultation with Advisor from list of Psychology Department Approved Restricted Electives. 

"^aken from ENG 331. 332, 333 or COM 1 10, 201, or 202. 

"Taken from approved GER Sci., Technology, and Soc. Elective (Science and Technology Perspective) list. 



136 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



/ 18 and 120 Page Hall Phone: (91 9)5 J 5-2315 

NCSU Box 7904 Fax: (919)515-8702 

Raleigh. NC 27695-7904 E-mail: engineering@ncsu.edu 



N. A. Masnari, Dean 

S. A. Rajala, Associate Dean for Academic .Affairs 

J. G. Gilligan Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs 

T. K. Miller, Assistant Dean for Distance Education and Information Technology 

G. Lee, Assistant Dean for Research Programs 

T. L. Mitchell. Assistant Dean for Engineering Student Services 

R. L. Porter. Assistant Dean for ,4cademic Affairs 

Men and women who seek a challenging technical career in research and development, design, construction, production, maintenance, technical sales, 
management, teaching, or other careers requiring a methodical, creative solution of problems, should consider an engineering or computer science education. 
At NC State, the College of Engineering has a distinguished and internationally recognized faculty. The faculty, together with the curricula of the 
undergraduate and graduate programs, offer an opportunity for ambitious men and women to become the leaders and prime movers of our increasingly 
technological world. Because of the great influence of science and technology on our everyday lives, today's engineers and computer scientists must be 
acutely aware of, and responsible for, the impact that their creations may have on society. In addition to safety, aesthetics, economics, and energy, today's 
technologist must consider environmental, sociological, and other "human concern" costs. 

The college's 30.000 graduates may be found in widely diversified careers throughout the world. Most are practicing in the engineering profession, but 
because their education has equipped them well to deal with problems in a wide variety of fields, many College of Engineering graduates have become 
corporate presidents, leaders in government, lawyers, and medical doctors, to name a few. 

The College of Engineering is organized into ten departments. Biological and Agricultural Engineering; Chemical Engineering; Civil Engineering; Computer 
Science; Electrical and Computer Engineering; Industrial Engineering; Material Science and Engineering; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Nuclear 
engineering; and Textile Engineering. Chemistry and Science. Sixteen undergraduate degree programs are offered in these ten departments. In addition, a 
degree program in Engineering is offered by special arrangement to the very few students who can clearly demonstrate the need for an individualized 
program of study. All departments also offer advanced studies leading to professional degrees, master's degrees and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 
(Consult the Graduate Catalog for graduate degrees.) 

The College of Engineering requests and receives accreditation from the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accrediting Board for Engineering 
and Technology (ABET) for thirteen of its undergraduate engineering degree programs. These are aerospace engineering, biological engineering, chemical 
engineering, civil engineering, civil engineering-construction option, computer engineering, electrical engineering, environmental engineering, industrial 
engineering, industrial engineering — furniture manufacturing, materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering, nuclear engineering, and textile 
engineering. The program in computer science is accredited by the Computer science Accreditation Commission (CSAC) of the Computing Sciences 
Accreditation Board (CSAB). Accreditation insures that these programs satisfy requirements for acceptance by these nationally recognized agencies. All 
curricula and programs are designed to maintain the college's national and international reputation while meeting the needs of the people and industries of 
the state and region through effective instruction, competent research, and the development of new and meaningful contributions to scientific knowledge. 

A Career Planning and Placement Center is maintained by the university to assist continuing students and graduating students in achieving their career goals. 

DEGREES 

Entering students receive assistance in planning an appropriate program of study and have available continued guidance from academic advisors throughout 
their academic careers. Beginning freshmen are enrolled in the Engineering Undesignated program for one to two years. After successfully completing 
Engineering Undesignated requirements, students may be admitted to a specific department. In order to be eligible to apply for admission into a degree 
program. Engineering Undesignated students must successfiilly complete at least 28 credit hours, including the following courses: MA 141 and MA 241; PY 
205;ENG111;E 115; CH 101, CH 102, and one of either CH 201 or CSC 110/112/114. 

Prerequisite requirement for all engineering courses-Before a student in the College of Engineering may enroll in a 200 or higher level engineering 
course, the student must have earned a grade of "C" or higher in ENG 1 11, MA 141, MA 241, PY 205, CH 101, and CH 102, and the student must have 
successfully completed E 1 1 5. and one of either CH 20 1 , CSC 1 1 0, CSC 1 1 2, or CSC 1 1 4. 

Bachelor of Science-The baccalaureate program provides preparation for entry into industry, government, business or private practice as well as graduate 
school. Graduates with a BS degree in engineering or computer science may be engaged in design development, production, construction, sales, 
maintenance, or the planning, operation or management of industrial units. 

The undergraduate curricula offer programs of study leading to bachelor's degrees in aerospace engineering, biological engineering, chemical engineering, 
civil engineering, civil engineering-construction option, construction management, computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, 
environmental engineering, industrial engineering, industrial engineering-furniture manufacturing option, materials science and engineering, mechanical 
engineering, nuclear engineering, and textile engineering. Graduation requirements include completion of one of the sixteen curricula with an overall grade 
point average of 2.0 and a grade point average of 2.0 in the major courses. The total number of required credits ranges from 120 to 128 semester hours. 

DOIIBLE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

NC State students may wish to earn Bachelor of Science degrees in two fields of engineering and in computer science and an engineering field. When the 
two courses of study are planned early and carefully, a number of courses can simultaneously satisfy requirements in both degrees. Humanities, social 
science, physics, mathematics, chemistry, English and physical education sequences are common to most curricula. In addition, required courses in one 

137 



curriculum can sometimes be uses as electives in another field. A well-planned double degree program can be completed in five years. Students interested in 
such a program should consult the Assistant Dean for Student Services. 

Under the BSEE/MSM Program, students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering and a Master of Science in Management during a 
five-year course of carefully planned study. 

Under the BSCHE/MSN Program, students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering and a Master of Science in Management during 
a five-year course of carefully planned study. 

Other students may wish to combine a bachelor of science in engineering or computer science with a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree in 
another college or school at North Carolina State University. Here also, a number of courses required for one degree may also satisfy requirements for a 
second degree. When the two courses of study are planned early and carefiilly. a double-degree program can be completed in as few as five years. Students 
interested in such a program should contact the Assistant Dean for Student Services. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Each curriculum in the College of Engineering has a technical society open to every student enrolled in the curriculum. In most cases, these are student 
chapters of national professional organizations. Each curriculum also has one or more honor societies to give recognition to students who have earned 
superior academic records. In addition, there are college-wide honor, professional, and service societies that offer personally and educationally rewarding 
opportunities for students. 

Student representatives of each curriculum serve on the Engineers' Council. The Council is coordinating agency for college-wide activities such as the 
Engineering Fundamentals Examination review classes, the Engineers' Week Exhibition, the annual St. Patrick's Day Dance, and the N.C. Stale Engineer 
student publication. 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Each student in the College of Engineering is required to take a minimum of 21 credit hours of humanities and social science courses. At least one course 
used to fulfill the requirements must be selected from the list of courses which focus on a non-English speaking culture. All of the courses used to 
satisfy the humanities and social science requirement must be taken from the College of Engineering list of approved courses and all must be completed with 
regular grading. The courses will be distributed as designated below: 

1 . Select a beginning economics course, EC 20 1 or ARE 20 1 . 

2. Select two courses from the list of history courses from the list of literature courses. At least one course must be at the advanced level. History courses 
must be selected from the same group and literature courses must be taken from the same language. 

3. Select one course from the list of philosophy, religion, and visual/performing arts courses. 

4. Select one course from the list of science, technology, and society courses. 

5. Select one course from the following social science areas: anthropology, cultural geography, politics and government, psychology, or sociology. 

6. Select one advanced course from the following social science areas: anthropology, economics, politics and government, psychology, or sociology. The 
advanced course must be selected from an area in which an introductory course has been completed. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

This optional program is structured so that the student will alternate semesters of study with semesters of practical work as sophomores and juniors. The 
freshman and senior years are spent on campus, while sophomore, junior academic work is spread over a three-year period to permit alternating academic 
semesters with work-experience semesters. Students earn a salary while they are in industry, and they may earn a sufficient income to finance much of their 
college educaUon. The co-op plan can be completed in five years, during which time the student receives 12 to 18 months of industrial experience. 

Students in all curricula in the College of Engineering may apply for the co-op program if they have a grade-point average of 2.25 or better. Afler a student 
has been accepted for employment, he or she is expected to maintain at least a 2.0 grade-point average. Application for admission into the co-op program 
should be made early in the spring semester of the freshmen year; however, later applications resulting in fewer work semesters prior to graduation will be 
considered during the sophomore year or the first semester of the junior year. Engineering Undesignated students must be admitted into an engineering 
degree program prior to beginning the first co-op assignment. Further information may be obtained from the Office of Cooperative Education, 212 Peele 
Hall. 

HONORS AND SCHOLARS PROGRAMS: 

ENGINEERING SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The Engineering Scholars Program has as its goal the promotion of research and academic careers in engineering and computer science. Under the 
sponsorship of the ofthe College of Engineering, in cooperation with the Divisionof Student Affairs, Scholars begin by living together and participating in 
special educational seminars, cultural enrichment activities, and special Scholars sections in some courses. In the sophomore year, engineering Scholars may 
begin research apprenticeships with faculty members throughout the College of Engineering. Additional information may be obtained by contacting 
departmental program representatives. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

A limited number of freshmen in the College of Engineering are selected to participate in the Benjamin Franklin Scholars program. In addition to their major 
courses, each Benjamin Franklin Scholar develops an individualized, five-year plan of work focused on a central theme in the humanities and social 
sciences. Students completing the program receive a Bachelor of Science in an engineering discipline or computer science and a Bachelor's degree in 
muhidisciplinary studies. 

This double-degree program provides a unique opportunity to integrate a solid base of knowledge in technology or science with a broad philosophical 
perspective ofthe humanities. The curriculum for the double-degree program has four main components: (1) a strong general education, (2) specially 
designed interdisciplinary and problem-defining courses, (3) all technical course requirements associated with the engineering or computer science degree, 
and (4) a thirty-hour muhidisciplinary concentration designed by students in consultation with their advisors. With careful planning, this program can be 
completed in five years. 

For more information, contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Engineering (118 Page Hall), or the Assistant Dean for 
Undergraduate Affairs in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences (106 Caldwell Hall). 



138 



COMPUTERS 

During their first semester, new freshmen in the College enroll in a computer literacy course, E 1 1 5, which is taught using the EOS student computing 
facility. Following completion of E 1 1 5, It is expected that students will incorporate use of EOS workstations into all curricular areas, including the 
preparation of reports and papers in non-technical subjects. In either the freshman or sophomore year, most students will complete a course in computer 
programming and, thereafter, will increasingly use computers as an engineering tool. The College policy is that all of its students will be provided with the 
computing resources required to successfully complete their course of study. However, some students may find that owning a computer is beneficial in terms 
of convenience and ready access to computational capability. Since different departments within the College have different course and computer language 
requirements, the College recommends that new students who decide to purchase a personal computer should not do so until they have been admitted into a 
degree program. 

INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

The College is actively working to provide its students with opportunities for overseas work and study experience. In addition to the study abroad program 
which is available to all students at NCSU, College of Engineering students can participate in an exchange program with the Universite' de Technology de 
Compe'gne, France. Alternatively, through the College of Textiles, students interested in France can participate in an exchange program at the Catholic 
University of Lille, France. Students interested in Japan can participate in one of several programs offered by EAGLE, the Engineering Alliance for Global 
Education. 

TRANSFER PROGRAM 

Students with non-engineering degrees or one or more years of academic work completed at other institutions may apply for transfer admission to the 
College of Engineering through the University Admissions Office. Students are admitted from appropriate programs from four-year institutions, as well as 
junior and community colleges. 

Students currently attending or anticipating attendance at other institutions are advised to contact the Assistant Dean for Student Services for information 
regarding admission to NC State and credit for courses taken elsewhere. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN ENGINEERING 

The College of Engineering offers post-baccalaureate curricula leading to the degrees of Aerospace engineer. Civil Engineer, and Mechanical Engineer. 
These programs of study are designed to fit the needs of students desiring intensive specialization in a particular field, or additional work not ordinarily 
covered in the normal undergraduate curricula. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING http://www bae.ncsu edu/ 

David S. Weaver Laboratories (Room 100) 
Phone: (919)515-2694 

D. B. Beasley, Head 

R. O. Evans, Jr., Departmeni Extension Leader 
i. H. Young, Director of Graduate Programs 
C. G. Bowers, Jr., Undergraduate Coordinator 

Distinguished University Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: R.W. Skagss\Professors: C.F. Abrams Jr., J.C. Barker, D.B. Beasley, R.W. 
Bottcher, C.J. Bowers Jr., F.J. Humenik, E.G. Humphries, W.H. Johnson, G.J. Kriz, W.F. McClure, R.P. Rohrbach, A.R. Rubin, R.S. Sowell, L.F. 
Strikeleather, P.W. Westerman, T.B. Whitaker (USDA), OH, Willits, J.H. Young;Adjunct Professors: F.E. Barton II, L.M. Safley Jr., S.S. Schifftnan, L.M. 
Sykes; Professors Emeriti: G.B. Blum Jr., H.D. Bowen, J.W. Dickens, LB. Driggers, J.M. Fore, G.W. Giles, EL. Howell, F.M. Richardson, RE. Sneed, 
C.W. Suggs, R.W. Watkins, EH. Wiser; Associate Professors: G.R. Baughman, S.M. Blanchard, M.D. Boyette, R.O. Evans, Jr., R.L. Huffman, G.D. 
Jennings, J.E. Parsons; Visiting Associate Professors: G.T. Roberson, J. Spooner; Assistant Professors: J. Cheng, J.J. Classen, S.A. Hale; Research Assistant 
Professors: D.M. Amatya, G.M. Chescheir, S.K. Leihr, Visilint Assistant Professor: G.L. Grabow, Adjunct Assistant Professors: D.D. Archibald, R.L. 
Langley, S.K. Seymour; Senior Researcher: S.C. Mohapatra: Extension Specialists: E.J. Hewitt, III, W.F. Hunt, DE. Line, R.L. McLymore, J.M. Rice, R.E. 
Sheffield, R.L. Sherman; Associate Members of the Faculty: C.R. Daubert (Food Science), BE. Farkas (Food Science), A.E. Hassan (Forestry), K.M. 
Keener (Food Science), T.M. Losordo (Zoology), S.C. Roe (Companion Animal & Special Species Medicine), K.P. Sandeep (Food Science). K.R. Swartze! 
(Food Science). 

The department offers a Bachelor of Science in Biological Engineering. Biological engineering "brings engineering to life". Students analyze, develop 
solutions to unique engineering problems involved with biological and agricultural systems. An area of concentration can be chosen whereby scientific and 
engineering principles are applied to diverse problems in a particular area. Examples of applications in areas of concentrations are biomechanical systems for 
biomedical applications; proper environmental management of soil and water resources; processing and marketing of food and fiber; and integrating 
machines, controls, and structures for biological and agricultural systems. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Conceptualizing, designing, and developing systems for producing, processing and packaging a high quality food supply, maintaining a high quality 
environment, and improving the quality of life for people and animals will provide many opportunities for graduates of the biological engineering 
curriculum. Jobs can be in design, development, research, outreach or sales in public institutions and in industry. Examples include food engineers for food 
processing companies, biological engineers for biomedical companies, design engineers for agricultural equipment companies, and environmental engineers 
for government environmental agencies, industry or engineering consulting firms. This curriculum, accredited by the Engineering Accreditafion Commission 
of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), also provides adequate training for post-graduate work leading to advanced degrees in 
Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

CURRICULA 

The curriculum provides an educational program for students which uniquely prepares them for dealing with engineering problems in the biological and 
agricultural areas. Flexibility in the program allows the student to choose electives which may lead to concentrations in the areas of (I) agricultural 
engineering. (2) biomedical engineering.(3) bioprocess engineering, (4) environmental engineering, or an emphasis area designed by the student and his/her 
advisor Emphasis is placed on basic science and engineering courses such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, mechanics, biology, soils, and 
thermodynamics which provide a sound background for the application of engineering to biological problems. 



139 



The program is jointly administered by The College of Engineering and Th e College of Agriculture and Life Science s in order to assure quality of basic 
training in both engineering and the life sciences. Freshmen entering this curriculum should enroll in the College of Engineering undesignated program and 
indicate BEU as their curriculum choice. After successftilly completing the Engineering undesignated requirements the student will enter the Biological and 
Agricultural Engineering Department in the BE curriculum. 



CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Biological Engineering 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 

Any 100-level PE in Fimess & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 

1 
3 
4 
3 
I 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 101 Intro, to BAE & Comp. 

MAE 206 Engr. Statics^ or 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics-Statics 

MA 242 Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 



Spring Semester 

BAE 202 Intro, to BAE Methods 

BAE(BIO) 235 Engr Biology 

MAE 208 Engr. Dynamics^ or 

CE 215 Engr Mechanics - Dynamics 

MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 



Credits 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 402 Transport Phenomena 

BAE Elective' 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics^ or 

CE 382 Hydraulics 

CH 220 Organic Chemistry' 

ST 361 or ST 370 Statistics 



Credits 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

BAE 315 Properties of Bio. Engr Materials 

BAE Elective' 

ECE 331 Princ. Electr Engr I 

MAE 314 Solid MechanicsW 

CE 3 13 Mechanics of Solids 

Biol. Science Elective* 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 

3 
4 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 401 Bioinstrumentation 
BAE 451 Engr. Design I 
Engr. Sci. Elective' 
Ethics Elective' 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
Communication Elective' 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
17 



Spring Semester 
BAE 452 Engr. Design II 
Biol. Science Elective* 
Humanitites/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
Humanitites/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 128 

'Eighteen (18) hours Humanities/Social Sciences from the College of Engineering approved courses(Requires EC 201,EC 205, or ARE 201)and guidelines 

for choosing courses plus three(3) hours for the Science, Technology and Society category.' 

'Students should follow either the CE214-CE2I 5-CE382-CE313 or MAE206-MAE208-MAE308-MAE314 sequence. 

'Choose from: BAE 361, BAE 422, BAE 465. BAE 471, BAE 481. 

'Students planning to go to medical school or to take BCH 45 1 should take CH 22 1 followed by CH 223. 

'Choose from: ANS 1 50 or ZO 1 50 or ZO 1 60, ANS 20 1 , ANS 205, ANS 230, ANS 324, ANS 402, ANS 403, ANS 404, BCH 45 1 , BO 200, BO 277, BO 

360, BO 42 1 , COM 445, CS 200, CS 2 1 3, CS 3 1 8, CS 4 1 1 , FOR 252, FS 402, FS 42 1 , FW(ZO) 420, GN 4 1 1 , HS 30 1 , HS 42 1 , HS 422, HS 43 1 . HS 440, 

HS(FS) 462, MB 351, MB 352, MB 41 1, MB 412, PO 201, PO 322, PO 405, PO 420, PO 423, PO 425, SSC 200, SSC 370, SSC 461, ZO 212, ZO 250, ZO 

260, ZO 410, ZO(BO) 414, ZO 419, ZO 421. 

'Choose from: Any BAE elective', BAE 462, BAE 472/572, BAE 473/573, BAE 495, BAE 522, BAE 578, FS(BAE)585, IE (CSC) 441, IE 543, IE 544, 

MAE 510. 

'Choose from: MDS 201, MDS 320, MDS 325, PHI 31 1, PHI 322. Satisfies Science, Technology and Society category of the General Education 

Requirements. 

"Choose from: COM 1 10, ENG 331, ENG 333. 



140 



CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING, Agricultural Engineering Concentration 
Degree earned: B.S. in Biological Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus 1 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 

1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 101 Intro, to BAE & Comp. 

MAE 206 Engr. Statics ^or 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics-Statics 

MA 242 Calculus 111 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

BAE 202 Intro, to BAE Methods 

BAE(BIO) 235 Engr. Biology 

MAE 208 Engr. Dynamics^ or 

CE 215 Engr. Mechanics - Dynamics 

MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 402 Transport Phenomena 

BAE Elective' 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics^ or 

CE 382 Hydraulics 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

ST 361 or ST 370 Statistics 



Spring Semester 

BAE 315 Properties of Bio. Engr. Materials 

BAE 361 Analytic Meth. Engr. Design 

ECE33I Princ. Electr. Engr I 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics^ or 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 

CH 220 Organic Chemistry 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 



Fall Semester 

BAE 401 Bioinstrumentation 
BAE 45 1 Engr. Design I 
Engr. Sci. Elective' 
Ethics Elective' 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
Communication Elective' 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

3 BAE 452 Engr. Design II 

2 Biol. Science Elective* 

3 Biol, or Engr Science Elective'' 
3 Humanitites/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
3 Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 
3 Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 
17 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 

Total Hours Required for Graduation: 131 

'Eighteen (18) hours Humanities/Social Sciences from the College of Engineering approved courses (Requires EC 201,EC 205, or ARE 201) and guidelines 

for choosing courses plus three(3) hours for the Science, Technology and Society category.' 

^Students should follow either the CE2 1 4-CE2 1 5-CE382-CE3 1 3 or MAE206-MAE208-MAE308-MAE3 1 4 sequence. 

'Choose from: BAE 422, BAE 465. BAE 471, BAE 481. 

'Choose from: ANS 1 50 or ZO 1 50, ANS 205, ANS 20 1 , ANS 230, ANS 324, ANS 402, ANS 403. ANS 404, BO 200, BO 360, BO 421 , CS 200, CS 213, 

CS 3 1 8, CS 4 1 1 . FOR 252. HS 30 1 , HS 42 1 , HS 422, HS 43 1 , HS 440, HS(FS) 462, PO 20 1 , PO 322, PO 405, PO 420, PO 423, PO 425, SSC 370, SSC 

461, ZO 260. 

"Choose from: BAE 462, BAE 472, BAE 473, BAE 578, IE 31 1 (if two Engr.Science Electives are taken), MAE 435 (if two Engr.Science Electives are 

taken). 

'Choose from: MDS 201, MDS 320, MDS 325, PHI 31 1, PHI 322. Satisfies Science, Technology and Society category of the General Education 

Requirements. 

'Choose from: COM 1 10, ENG 331, ENG 333. 

CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING, Biomedical Engineering Concentration 
Degree earned: B.S. in Biological Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 

1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



141 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 101 Intro, to BAE & Comp. 

MAE 206 Engr. Statics^ or 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics-Statics 

MA 242 Calculus 111 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 



Spring Semester 

BAE 202 Intro, to BAE Methods 

BAE(BIO) 235 Engr. Biology 

MAE 208 Engr. Dynamics^ or 

CE 215 Engr. Mechanics - Dynamics 

MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 402 Transport Phenomena 

BAE 465 Biomed. Engr. Applications 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics^ or 

CE 382 Hydraulics 

CH 220 Organic Chemistry' 

ST 361 or ST 370 Statistics 



Spring Semester 

BAE 315 Properties of Bio. Engr. Materials 

BAE Elective' 

ECE 33 1 Princ. Electr. Engr. 1 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics^ or 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 

Biol. Science Elective' 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 401 Bioinstrumentation 
BAE 45 1 Engr. Design I 
Engr. Sci. Elective* 
Ethics Elective' 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
Communication Elective' 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

BAE 452 Engr. Design II 

Biol. Science Elective* 

Biol, or Engr. Science Elective' 

Humanitites/Soc.Sci. Elective' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 131 

'Eighteen (18) hours Humanities/Social Sciences from the College of Engineering approved courses (Requires EC 201, EC 205, or ARE 201) and guidelines 

for choosing courses plus three(3) hours for the Science, Technology and Society category.' 

^Students should follow either the CE214-CE215-CE382-CE3 13 or MAE206-MAE208-MAE308-MAE314 sequence. 

'Choose from: BAE 361, BAE 422, BAE 471, BAE 481. 

^Students planning to go to medical school or to take BCH 451 should take CH 221 followed by CH 223. 

'Choose from: ANS l50orZO ISOorZO 160, BCH451, B0 277,COM445, GN411,MB351,MB 352,MB411, MB412, ZO212,ZO250,ZO410, 

ZO(BO)414,Z0 42l. 

'Choose from: BAE 522, IE 31 1 (if two Engr.Science Elective are taken), IE 543, IE 544, MAE 435 (if two Engr.Science Elective are taken), MAE 510. 

'Choose from: MDS 201, MDS 320, MDS 325, PHI 31 1, PHI 322. Satisfies Science, Technology and Society category of the General Education 

Requirements. 

"Choose from: COM 1 10, ENG331, ENG333. 

CURRICULtlVl IN BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING, Bioprocess Engineering Concentration 
Degree earned: B.S. in Biological Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 

Any 100-level PE in Fimess & Wellness 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus 11 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 101 Intro, to BAE & Comp. 

MAE 206 Engr. Statics^ or 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics-Statics 

MA 242 Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 



Spring Semester 

BAE 202 Intro, to BAE Methods 

BAE(BIO) 235 Engr. Biology 

MAE 208 Engr. Dynamics^ or 

CE 215 Engr. Mechanics - Dynamics 

MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 



Credits 
3 
3 



142 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 402 Transport Phenomena 

BAE Elective' 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics' or 

CE 382 Hydraulics 

CH 220 Organic Chemistry 

ST 361 or ST 370 Statistics 



Is Spring Semester 

3 BAE 3 1 5 Properties of Bio. Engr. Materials 

3 BAE 422 Intro. Food Process Engr. 
ECE33I Princ. Electr. Engr. 1 

3 MAE 314 Solid Mechanics' or 

4 CE 3 1 3 Mechanics of Solids 

3 MB 351 General Microbiology 

16 MB 352 General Microbiology Lab 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 401 Bioinstrumentation 
BAE 45 1 Engr. Design I 
FS 402 Food Chemistry 
FS 421 Food Preservation 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
Communication Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 BAE 452 Engr. Design II 

2 Ethics Elective' 

3 Engr. Science Elective* 

3 Humanitites/Soc.Sci. Elective' 

3 Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 

3 Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 
17 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 131 

'Eighteen (18) hours Humanities/Social Sciences from the College of Engineering approved courses (Requires EC 201, EC 205 or ARE 201) and guidelines 

for choosing courses plus three(3) hours for the Science, Technology and Society category.' 

'Students should follow either the CE214-CE215-CE382-CE313 or MAE206-MAE208-MAE308-MAE314 sequence. 

'Choose from: BAE 361, BAE 465, BAE 471, BAE 481. 

'Choose from: CHE 425, CHE 467, CHE 551, FS (BAE) 585. 

'Choose from: MDS 201, MDS 320, MDS 325, PHI 31 1, PHI 322. Satisfies Science, Technology and Society category of the General Education 

Requirements. 

'Choose from: COM 1 10. ENG 331, ENG 333. 

CtRRlCtLlIM IN BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING, Environmental Engineering Concentration 
Degree earned: B.S. in Biological Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA241CalculusII 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 101 Intro, to BAE & Comp. 

MAE 206 Engr. Statics' or 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics-Statics 

MA 242 Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

BAE 202 Intro, to BAE Methods 

BAE(BIO) 235 Engr. Biology 

MAE 208 Engr. Dynamics' or 

CE 215 Engr. Mechanics - Dynamics 

MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 



Credits 
3 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BAE 402 Transport Phenomena 

BAE 471 Land Resource Envir.Engr. 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics' or 

CE 382 Hydraulics 

CH 220 Organic Chemistry 

SSC 200 Soil Science 



Credits 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

BAE 315 Properties of Bio. Engr. Materials 

BAE 472/572 Irrigation & Drainage 

ECE331 Princ. Electr. Engr. I 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics' or 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 

ST 361 or ST 370 Statistics 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 



143 



Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BAE401 Bioinstrumentation 3 BAE 452 Engr. Design II 3 

BAE 45 1 Engr. Design 1 2 Biol. Science Elective' 3 

Engr. Sci. Elective' 3 BAE Elective' 3 

Ethics Elective' 3 Humanitites/Soc.Sci. Elective' 3 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 3 Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 3 

Communication Elective' 3 Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective' 3 

17 18 

Total Hours Required for Graduation: 131 

'Eighteen (18) hours Humanities/Social Sciences from the College of Engineering approved courses (Requires EC 20, EC 205 or ARE 201) and guidelines 

for choosing courses plus three(3) hours for the Science, Technology and Society category.' 

^Students should follow either the CE2I4-CE215-CE382-CE313 or MAE206-MAE208-MAE308-MAE314 sequence. 

'Choose from: BAE 361, BAE 422, BAE 465, BAE 481. 

'Choose from: BO 360, BO 421, MB 351, MB 352, SSC 461, ZO 419. 

'Choose from: BAE 473/573, BAE 578. 

'Choose from: MDS 201, MDS 320, MDS 325, PHI 31 1, PHI 322. Satisfies Science, Technology and Society category of the General Education 

Requirements. 

'Choose from: COM 1 10, ENG 331, ENG 333. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING www che ncsu edu/ 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories, Room 1 13 
Phone; (919)515-2324 

R. G. Carbonell, Head 

B. D. Freeman, Associate Head 

P. K. Kil Patrick, Associate Head 

S. A. Khan, Director of Graduate Programs 

H. Winston, Coordinator of Advising 

Distinguished University Professor: D.F. OIlis; Aloca Professors C.K. Hall, R.M. Kelly; Camille Dreyfus Professor: H.B. Hopfenberg; H. Clark 
Professor: K.E. Gubbins; Hoechst-Celanese Professors: R.G. Carbonell, R.M. Fielder; Professors: K.J. Bachman, R.G. Carbonell, J.E. DeSimone, PS. 
Fedkiw, R.M. Felder, B.D. Freeman, K.E. Gubbins, C.K. Hall, H.B. Hopfenberg, R.M. Kelly, P.K. Kilpatrick, P.K. Lim, DC. Martin, D.F. Ollis, MR. 
Overcash, G.W. Roberts, C.J. Setzer; Adjunct Professors: D.J. Hammond, D.J. Kiserow, I. Pinnau, C Quah, ME. Stewart, AH. Wehe, R.F. Weimer, J.L. 
^\\\\ami,Professors Emeriti: K.O. Beatty, J.K. Ferrell, D.B. Marsland, AS. Michaels, V.T. Stannett; Associate Professors: CM. Balik. C.S. Grant, S.A. 
Khan, H.H. Lamb, G.N. Parsons, S.W. Peretti, R.J. Spontak, H. Winston; Adjunct Associate Professors: P. Schlosser, J.J. Spivey ; Assistant Professor: J. 
Gemxi, Adjunct Assistant Professor: R.T. Chem, J. Jun. 

The sound management of material, environmental, and energy resources, taking into account natural economic constraints, guides the performance of 
chemical engineering practice. Chemical engineering education integrates design and analysis, science and technology, with communication skills developed 
through exposure to the humanities and the social and economic sciences. Chemical engineering organizes these diverse skills into a coherent discipline 
uniquely suited to the needs of the chemical, biochemical, environmental, petroleum, plastics, textile, and pulp and paper industries. 

FACILITIES 

Departmental teaching and research activities are based on the four floors comprising the east wing of the Riddick Engineering Laboratories. Equipment for 
studying the principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, distillation, absorption, and drying is maintained in several laboratories. Chemical reaction kinetics 
including heterogeneous catalysis and polymerization are studied on specially designed equipment. Extensive apparatus is available for characterizing the 
relationships between molecular structure and bulk properties of polymers. A 2,000 square foot biotechnology laboratory has been equipped to include a 
pilot plant for studying biologically- mediated chemical reactions. Specialized digital computational equipment complements campus-wide university 
computer resources. The department makes constant use of the College of Engineering EOS computer system which is accessible for use 24 hours a day by 
students and faculty. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates find employment at attractive salaries in diverse sub-disciplines including research and development, production, management and administration; 
process control, technical service, and sales; estimation and specification writing; consulting and teaching. Students desiring careers in teaching, research, or 
consulting are advised to consider graduate training (consult the Graduate Catalog). Chemical engineering graduates often pursue careers in law or the 
medical sciences since the broadly structured undergraduate curticulum provides strong preparation for graduate study in a wide range of professional 
specialties. 

MINOR IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

In addition to B.S. graduates of the chemical engineering program at NC State, there is a pool of students in other disciplines whose professional work 
assignments may require a knowledge of chemical engineering nomenclature, technologies and methods. The minor in chemical engineering is intended to 
allow such students to develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts and practice of chemical engineering. This minor should be most attractive to 
undergraduate students in environmental engineering, pulp and paper technology, and chemistry, and it will allow non-chemical engineering majors to 
prepare themselves for graduate study in chemical engineering with a minimum amount of prerequisite work following their acceptance into the graduate 
program. 

Students enrolled in the minor in chemical engineering must complete CHE 205, CHE 225, CHE 311, CHE 315, CHE 3 16, and CHE 446. All the courses 
must be completed with a grade of C - or higher. 

An application for the minor must be submitted to the Coordinator of Advising in the Department of Chemical Engineering. Admission to the minor will 
require a minimum 2.5 over-all grade point average at NC State, and a grade of B- or higher on the first enrollment in CHE 205. 

144 



CURRICULA 

The successful practice of chemical engineering requires a broad, diversified preparation. The spirit of research and experimental inquiry is vital; students, 
therefore, require sound scientific backgrounds essential to original and disciplined thought, enthusiastic inquiry and, ultimately, original and constructive 
accomplishment. The undergraduate curriculum emphasizes the scientific, engineering, and economic principles involved in the design and operation of 
chemical processes. 

Design methodologies are practiced in all core chemical engineering courses. This integrated design experience culminates with the senior design sequence, 
CHE 450 and CHE 45 1 . The background in organic, physical, and inorganic chemistry is comparable to the training offered to chemistry majors. 
Mathematics, physical sciences, and distributed humanities courses are also required. The chemical engineering program, which is accredited by the 
Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), leads to the degree Bachelor of Science in 
Chemical Engineering. 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 


I 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 

Physical Education 



Credits 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

CHE 205 Chemical Proc. Principle 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Fall Semester 

CH 3 1 5 Quantitative Analysis 
CHE 3 1 1 Transport Processes I 
CHE 3 1 5 Chem Process Thermo 
ECE 331 Principle Electrical Engr or 
MAT 201 Struct. Prop. Engr. Materials 
ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 



Spring Semester 


Credits 


CH 223 Organic Chemistry 11 


4 


CHE 225 Chemical Proc. Systems 


3 


MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 


3 


PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. 11 


4 


Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 


3 




17 


I YEAR 




Spring Semester 


Credits 


Chemistry Elective 


4 


CHE 312 Transport Processes II 


3 


CHE 316 Thermo of Chem & Phase Equations 


3 


CHE 330 CHE Lab 1 


3 


Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 


3 




16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CHE 331 CHE Lab II 

CHE 446 Des. & Analy. Chem. Reactors 

CHE 450 CHE Design I 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 

Technical Elective 



Credits 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
14 



Spring Semester 

CHE 425 Proc System Analy & Control 
CHE 451 CHE Design II 
Humanites/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Technical Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 125 

•Note: All students graduating from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level (second semester.) 

BIOSCIENCES CONCENTRATION IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

By enhanced exposure to the biological sciences, the biosciences option in chemical engineering enables the student to develop insight into biological 
systems and processes 



145 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING.BIOSCIENCES OPTION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Chemical Engineering 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Fall Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

CHE 205 Chemical Proc. Principle 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 



Fall Semester 

BCH451 Intro. Biochemistry 

BCH 452 Biochemistry Lab 

CHE 311 Transport Proc. I 

CHE 315 Chemical Proc. Thermo. 

ECE 331 Principle Electrical Engr. or 

MAT 201 Struct. & Props. Engr. Materials 

ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 



Fall Semester 

CHE 331 CHE Lab II 

CHE 446 Des. & Analy. Chem. Reactors 

CHE 450 CHE Design 1 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 

I 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus 11 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 

Physical Education 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

dits Spring Semester 

4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

4 CHE 225 Chemical Proc. Systems 

4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

4 PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Spring Semester 

Bioscience Elective 

CHE 312 Transport Processes II 

CHE 3 16 Thermo of Chem & Phase Equations 

CHE 330 CHE Lab I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 



Credits 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
14 



Spring Semester 

CHE 425 Proc System Analy & Control 

CHE 451 CHE Design II 

CHE 551 Biochemical Engr. 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
17 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total Hours Required for Graduations: 127 

*Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level (second semester). 

ELECRONIC MATERULS CONCENTRATION IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

The electronic materials option in chemical engineering allows the student to develop an understanding of the scientific and technological principles 
associated with design and manufacture of computer chips and other microelectronics devices. 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, Electronic Materials Concentration 
Degree earned: B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 

I 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



146 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

CHE 205 Chemical Proc. Principle 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. II 



Fall Semester 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 

CHE 3 1 1 Transport Proc. I 

CHE 3 1 5 Chemical Proc. Thermo. 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Fall Semester 

CHE 331 Chemical Engr. Lab II 

CHE 446 Des. & Analy. Chem. Reactors 

CHE 450 CHE Design I 

Electronic Materials Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry H 

4 CHE 225 Chemical Proc. Systems 

4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

4 MAT 201 Struct. & Props. Engr. Materials 

16 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 437 Physical Chem. for Engrs. 

3 CHE 312 Transport Processes II 

3 CHE 3 1 6 Thermo of Chem & Phase Equations 

3 CHE 330 CHE Lab I 

3 MAT 331 Electronic Prop, of Materials 

16 MAT 333 Electronic Prop. Lab 



SENIOR YEAR 



Credits 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
17 



Spring Semester 

CHE 425 Proc System Analy & Control 

CHE 451 CHE Design II 

CHE 460 Chem. Process of Elec. Materials 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
17 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 129 
'Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, Pollution Prevention Concentration 
Degree earned: B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

* Students who complete this concentration will gain knowledge for the analysis and design of environmentally conscious manufacturing processes and 
operations. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 
CHE 205 Chemical Proc. Prin. 
MA 242 Calculus III 
Humanities/Soc Sci. Elective 



Fall Semester 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 

CHE 3 1 1 Transport Processes I 

CHE 315 Chem Process Thermo. 

CHE 485 Mgmt. of Hazardous Wastes 

ECE Prin. of Electrical Engr. or 

MAT 201 Struct. & Prop. Engr. Material 

ENG 33 1 Comm for Engr. & Tech 



Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 




1 CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 




ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 




1 MA 241 Calculus II 




3 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 




4 Physical Education 




3 

1 


16 


1 

16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 


4 


4 CHE 225 Chemical Proc. Systems 


3 


4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 


3 


3 PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. 11 


4 


IS Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 


3 




17 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


4 Pollution Prevention Elective 


3 


3 CHE 3 1 2 Transport Processes II 


3 


3 CHE 3 1 6 Thermo Chem & Phase Equations 


3 


1 CHE 330 CHE Lab I 


3 


Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 


3 


3 
3 


15 


17 





147 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Chemistry Elective 

CHE 331 CHE Lab II 

CHE 446 Des. & Analysis Chem. Reactors 

CHE 450 CHE Design 1 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
4 
2 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Spring Semester 

CHE 425 Proc System Analysis & Control 

CHE 451 CHE Design II 

CHE 475 Advances in Pollution Prevention 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 126* 

* Note: All students graduating from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level (second semester.) 

CHE Pollution Prevention Electives (3 hours required) must be selected from the following list: 

CE 280 Principles of Environmental Engineering 

CE 456 Air Quality 

CE 476 Air Pollution Control 

CE 477 Solid Waste Management 

CE 484 Water Supply and Waste Water Systems 

T 401 Environmental Aspects of Textiles Industrie 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, Polymer Science Concentration 
Degree earned: B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

* Students who complete the polymer sciences concentration in chemical engineering will gain an understanding of the fundamental principles and 
technology associated with the design, analysis, and processing of plastics, colloids, composites and complex polymeric systems. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 
CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 
ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 
MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 
PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 
Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

CHE 205 Chemical Proc. Prin. 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



's Spring Semester 

4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

4 CHE 225 Chemical Proc. Systems 

4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

3 PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. II 

15 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CHE 3 1 1 Transport Processes I 
CHE 315 Chem Process Thermo. 
MAT 201 Struct. Prop. Engr. Materials 
TC 461 Intro. Fiber Form. Polymers 
ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 

CHE 312 Transport Processes II 

CHE 316 Thermo Chem & Phase Equations 

CHE 330 CHE Lab I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CHE 331 CHE Lab II 

CHE 446 Des. & Analy. Chem. Reactors 

CHE 450 CHE Design I 

CHE 461 Polymer Sci. & Tech. or 

MAT 425 Intro, to Polymeric Materials 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Spring Semester 

CHE 425 Proc System Analy & Control 

CHE 451 CHE Design II 

Polymer Sciences. Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 125* 



148 



• Note: All students graduating from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level (second semester.) 

CHE Polymer Sciences Electives (3 credits required) must be selected from the following list: 

CHE 465 Difliision in Polymers 

CHE 467 Polymer Rheology 

CHE 469 Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials 

MAT 475 Polymer Technology and Engineering 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The Honors Program allows talented students to gain a deeper understanding of chemical engineering principles than would be acquired by completing the 
"standard" CHE curriculum. Admission to the program requires students to have earned a minimum overall grade point average of 3.500, and a minimum 
grade point average of 3.250 in CHE 205 and CHE 225. 

CURRICULliM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, Honors Program 
Degree earned: B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus! 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
I 

I 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemisuy Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc I 

Physical Education 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 
CHE 205 Chemical Proc. Principle 
MA 242 Calculus III 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

4 CHE 225 Chemical Proc. Systems 

4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

3 PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. II 

15 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 3 1 5 Quantitative Analysis 
CHE 3 1 IH Transport Processes I 
CHE 3 1 5 Chem Process Thermo 
ECE 331 Principle Electrical Engr or 
MAT 201 Struct. Prop. Engr. Materials 
ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 



Spring Semester 

Chemistry Elective 

CHE 3I2H Transport Processes II 

CHE 316 Thermo of Chem & Phase Equations 

CHE 330 CHE Lab I 

Mathematics Elective' 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CHE 497 Chem. Engr. Projects 

CHE 446 Des & Analy. Chem. Reactors 

CHE 450 CHE Design I 

Honors Program Elective' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Spring Semester 

CHE 425 Proc System Analysis & Control 
CHE 45 1 CHE Design II 
Humanites/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Technical Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 129 



Notes: 

'The mathematics course will be selected from MA 401, MA 402, MA 405, MA 427, or MA 501. 

'Honors Program Elective. Choose one from: CHE 511. CHE 513, or CHE 515 

•All students graduating from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level (second semester.) 



149 



DUAL DEGREE: B.S. Chemical Engineering / M.S. Management 

CURRICULUM FOR DUAL DEGREE: BS CHEMICAL ENGINEERING/MS MANAGEMENT 
Degrees earned: B.S. Electrical Engineering and M.S. Management 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semsler 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 


1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. 

Physical Education 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 
CH 221 Organic Chemistry 
CHE 205 Chemical Process Prin. 
MA 242 Calculus III 
Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 
Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 
CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 
CHE 225 Chemical Proc. Systems 
MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 
PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 
Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 

CHE 311 Transport Prod 

CHE 315 Chem. Process Thermo. 

ECE 331 Prin. Electr. Engr. or 

MA 201 Struct. & Prop. Engr Matl. 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr & Tech. 



Spring Semester 

Chemistry Elective 

CHE 312 Transport Proc. II 

CHE 316 Termo. Chem. & Phase Eq 

CHE 330 CHE Lab I 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ACC 581/582 Accounting 

CHE 446 Des & Analy.Chem. Reac. 

CHE 450 CHE Design 1 

ECG 507 Microecon. & Bus. Environ. 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 

Physical Education 



Credits Spring Semester 

2 BUS 53 1 Managerial Proc. & Effect 

3 ST 361 Intro. Stat, for Engr. 
3 CHE 331 CHE Lab II 

2 CHE 425 Proc. Sys. Analysis & Control 

3 CHE 45 1 CHE Design II 
1 CHE 5XX** 

16 



Credits 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Fall Semester 

BUS 502/574 Global and Cultural Environ. 

BUS 571 Operations Mgmt. 

CHE5XX 

ECG 508 Macro. Econ. & Bus. Envr. 

BUS 541 Mgmt. Info. Sys. 

BUS 561 Mkt. Mgmt. & Strategy 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 BUS 501 Legal and Reg. Envr. 

2 BUS 521 Managerial Finance 

3 BUS 532 Human Res. Mgmt. 
2 BUS 533 Leadership 

2 BUS 581 Long Range Analysis 

2 BUS 583 Mgmt. Practicum 
15 



Total Hours Required for both BSCHE & MSM 



•Note: Only two of the four credit hours listed for PE count toward credit hours required for graduation. 

All students graduating from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 

**CHE 575 Advances in Pollution Prevention recommended. 



150 



DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING www ce ncsu edu/ 

Mann Hall. Room 203 
Phone: (919)515-2352 

E. Downey Brill, Jr., Head 

D. W. Johnson, Associate Head for Graduate Programs 

M. A. Bariaz, Associate Head 

W. L. Bingham, Coordinator of Advising 

Civil Engineering Distinguished Professor: J.M. Hanson.Professors: ED. Brill, Jr., R.C. Borden, R.H. Borden. J.S. Fisher, C.G. Gilbert, A.K. Gupta, J.M. 
Hanson, Y. Horie, D.W. Johnston, N.P. KJiosla, H.R. Malcom, W.J. Rasdorf, N.M. Rouphail, C.C. Tungyidjunct Professor: R.H. Reckhovi. Distinguished 
University Professor Emeritus: P.Z. Zia; Professors Emeriti: M. Amein. P.D. Cribbins, R.A. Douglas, J.F. Ely, R.E. Fadum. C.L. Heimbach, J.W. Horn, A.I. 
Kashef. C.L. Mann, Jr., PH. McDonald, HE. "flMs, Associate Professors: MA. Bariaz. J.W. Baugh, Jr., L.E. Bemold. W.L. Bingham. A.C. Chao, V.C. 
Gabr, J.E. Hummer, Y.R. Kim, P.C. Lambe, V.C. Matzen (Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor). J.M. Nau (Alumni Distinguished 
Undergraduate Professor), M.F. Overton, M.S. Rahman, JR. SXom: Associate Professors Emeriti: ED. Gurley. J.C. S>Tm^h■, Assistant Professors: J.J. 
Ducoste. H.C. Frey, A. Gupta, T. Hassan, D.R.U. Knappe, M.J. Kowalsky. N. Krstulovic-Opara. M.L. Leming. S.R. Ranjithan, A.A. Tayebali;/l^unc/ 
Assistant Professors: J.C. Brantley, III. L.R. Goode. DR. Van der \aai\..Lecturer: D.J. Lombardi; Lecturer and Senior Construction Extension Specialist: 
P.P. McCain; Adjunct Lecturers: B.A. Doll, BE. Matthews; Senior Extension Specialist: S.M. Rogers, Jr. 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers several degree programs concerned with the improvement and care of both public and private infrastructure and 
natural environments. The discipline addresses the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of buildings, dams, bridges, harbors, power 
facilities, pollution control facilities, and water supply and transportation systems. The curricula provide academic preparation for students considering a 
career in civil, construction, or environmental engineering. 

The department offers undergraduate degree programs leading to the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, the Bachelor of Science in Construction 
Engineering and Management, and the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering. All three programs are accredited by the Engineering 
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Graduation from an ABET accredited engineering degree is 
the first step toward registration as a Professional Engineer. All three programs also prepare students for graduate education. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

People will always need constructed facilities to live, work, and sustain their lives and environment, and civil, construction, and environmental engineers 
will always be needed to plan, design, and construct these facilities. Civil, construction, and environmental engineering comprise such a diversified field that 
graduates have a wide choice in locations and type of employment. Jobs range from federal, state, or municipal agencies to a variety of manufacturing and 
processing industries, consulting firms or construction companies. The work may be performed partially or wholly in an office or in the field and may be 
located in a small community, a large industry center or in a foreign country. Careers in either professional practice or teaching and research are common for 
many graduates who complete advanced degrees. 

FACILITIES 

The Department of Civil Engineering has well-equipped laboratories, including a computer laboratory. The computer laboratory contains public 
workstations and taps into the College of Engineering's Eos network, which provides access to a wide range of engineering software and campus-wide and 
off-campus computers. The Department's other laboratories contain a variety of special equipment for research in structures, mechanics, soils, construction 
materials, construction engineering, hydraulics, and environmental engineering. 

A new laboratory, the Constructed Facilities Laboratory (CFL) on Centennial Campus, features unique facilities devoted to all aspects of constructed 
infrastructure research and assessment. Those facilities include: specially designed reaction floors and walls for testing large-scale structural systems to 
failure such as full scale bridge girders up to 100 feet long and beam-column systems subject to earthquake loading; and large pits up to 20 feet deep for 
testing granular and compacted soils for foundation strength. State-of-the-art facilities like these heighten students' learning experiences by exposing them 
to the forefront of technological advances. 

CURRICULA 

The objective of each of the three curricula is to prepare the graduate for a career in the respective field and for lifelong learning through graduate education, 
continuing education, and/or self study. 

The Civil Engineering curriculum is designed to provide academic discipline in mathematics, the physical sciences, the humanities and social sciences, and 
the technical aspects of civil engineering. After introductory exposure to several of the professional areas such as environmental and water resources, 
geotechnical, structures, and transportation engineering, the student builds additional depth in one of these specialties. 

The curriculum in Construction Engineering and Management is designed for the students interested in the planning, design, direction, and management of 
consfruction projects. It includes the core course requirements in mathematics, the physical sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. After exposure 
to engineering fundamentals and engineering design of facilities, the curriculum provides a series of specialty courses in construction engineering related to 
the analysis, design, and management of the construction process. Two concentraUons are available: General related types of facilities and Mechanical 
Construction for those interested in building mechanical or industrial process systems. 

The curriculum in Environmental Engineering is designed for students interested in environmental protection. The curriculum provides students with basic 
knowledge of the chemical, biological and physical processes that govern the transport and fate of pollutants in the environment as well as the design of 
engineered systems. On graduation, students are prepared to work in the areas of water and wastewater treatment, air pollution control, solid waste 
management, and hydrology and water resources. The curriculum emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of environmental engineering with courses in both 
engineering and life sciences, including specialized courses on pollution control and waste management. 

POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDY 

If a student is interested in more intense specialization in one particular area, advanced training is available leading to a Professional Degree in civil 
engineering, the Master of Civil Engineering, the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy. Specialization areas include coastal and ocean engineering, 
computer-aided engineering, construction engineering and management, construction materials, environmental and water resource engineering, geotechnical 
engineering, mechanic and structural engineering and transportation engineering. With judicious choices of electives during the B S. program, a student may 
also prepare for additional studies in law. business administration, business management or city and regional planning. 

151 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Student chapters of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Associated General Contractors, National Association of Home Builders, Institute of 
Transportation Engineers, and Air and Waste Management Association undertake projects to fijrther student exposure to the profession. Guest speakers 
representing various aspects of engineering practice speak at weekly lunch meetings. Students who accumulate outstanding academic records may be 
considered for membership in the Chi Epsilon Honorary Society. Through the generosity of industry and program alumni, many departmental scholarships 
are available on a competitive basis to students in addition to university, college and need-based financial aid. 

CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Civil Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

EC 205 Fundamentals of Econ. (H&SS Elect. I) 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Fall Semester 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics - Statics 

GC 120 Foundations of Graphics 

MA 242 Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' (H&SS Elect. 2) 



Fall Semester 

CE 375 Civil Engr. Systems 

CE 382 Hydraulics 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 

ST 370 Prob. & Stat. 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' (H&SS Elect. 4) 



Fall Semester 

CE Design Elective I'' 

CE Technical Elective IV^ 

Engineering Sci. Elective l' 

COM 1 10 Public Speaking or 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective I (H&SS Elect. 6) 



Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 CSC 1 1 2 Intro, to Comp - FORTRAN or 




1 CSC 1 1 4 Intro, to Comp. - C++ 


3 


ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 


3 


I MA 241 Calculus II 


4 


3 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 


4 


3 Physical Education 


1 


4 

1 


15 


I 

16 




SOPHOMORE YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 CE 2 1 5 Engr. Mechanics - Dynamics 


3 


3 CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 


3 


4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations or 




4 MA 305 Elem. Linear Algebra 


3 


3 MAT 200 Mech. Prop, of Structural Materials 


3 


17 MA 302 Numerical App. to Diflf. Equations 


1 


Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' (H&SS Elect. 3 


3 




16 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 CE Technical Elective l' 


3 


3 CE Technical Elective IP 


3 


3 CE Technical Elective III^ 


3 


3 CE 324 Structural Behavior Meas. or 




3 CE 381 Hydraulics Lab 


1 


15 Basic Science Elective' 


4 


Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' (H&SS Elect. 5) 


3 




17 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 CE Design Elective 11^ 


3 


4 CE Design Elective III' 


3 


3 Engineering Sci. Elective 11' 


3 


Engineering Sci. Elective III' 


3 


3 Human/Soc. Sci. Elect'(H&SS Elec. 7)<TD3 




3 


15 


16 





Total Hours Required for Graduation: 127* 

'Humanities & Social Science courses to be selected from the appropriate list approved by the College of Engineering. 

^CE Technical Electives to be selected from the approved list. 

'Basic Science Elective ..Select one: BIO 125, CH 201 and 202, or MEA 101 and MEA 1 10. 

■■CE Design Electives to be selected from the approved list. 

'Engineering Science Electives to be selected from the approved list. 

'Foreign language proficiency at the FL_102 level will be required for graduation for all students admitted as freshman or transfer students beginning the 

summer and fall of 1994. 



152 



CURRICULUM IN CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT 

General Construction Concentration 

Degree earned: B.S. in Construction Engineering and Management 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 

EC 201 Economics' (H&SS Elective I) 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Credits 
3 
I 

1 
3 
3 
4 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CSC 1 12 Intro, to Computing - FORTRAN or 

CSC 114 Intro, to Computing - C++ 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics Engr. & Sci. I 

Physical Education 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics - Statics 

EC 301 Microeconomics' (H&SS Elec. 2) 

GC 101 Engr Graphics I 

MA 242 Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. II 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CE 201 Civil Engr. Meas.& Surveys 

3 CE 2 1 5 Engr. Mechanics - Dynamics 
2 CE 260 Construction Engr. Sys. 

4 CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 

4 MAT200Mech. Prop, of Structural Materials 

16 ST 370 Probability and Statistics for Engrs. 



Credits 
2 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 

CE 324 Structural Behavior Meas. or 

CE 381 Hydraulics Sys. Meas. Lab 

CE 382 Hydraulics 

CE 463 Constr. Estim. Planning & Control 

COM 146 Business & Prof Communication or 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 



Spring Semester 

CE 327 Reinforced Concrete Design 

CE 342 Engr. Behavior Soils & Foundations 

CE 305 Traffic Engr. or 

CE 367 Mech. & Elec. Sys. in Buildings or 

CE 383 Hydrology & Urban Water Sys. 

CE 465 Construction Equipment & Methods 

Basic Science Elective^ 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 426 Structural Steel Design 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 

CE 466 Building Construction Engr. 

ECE 331 Principle Electrical Engr. I or 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics 1 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective '(H&SS Elect. 3) 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective '(H&SS Elect. 4) 



Spring Semester 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting or 

BUS 330 Human Resource Mgmt. 

CE 469 Construction Engr. Project 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' (H&SS Elec. 6) 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' (H&SS Elec. 7) 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective '(H&SS Elect. 8) 



Total Hours Required for Graduation^: 128 



'Humanities and Social Science courses to be selected from the appropriate list approved by the College of Engineering. 
'Basic science elective Select one: BIO 125, CH 107 & CH 127, or MEA 101 & MEA 1 10. 



CURRICULUM IN CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT 

Mechanical Construction Concentration 

Degree earned: B.S. in Construction Engineering and Management 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 
CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 
E 100 Intro, to COE 
E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ 
EC 205 Fundamentals of Economics' 
ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 
MA 141 Calculus I 
Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 

I 
3 
3 
4 

16 



Spring Semester 

CSC 112 Intro, to Comp - FORTRAN or 

CSC 1 14 Intro, to Comp. - C++ 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 

Physical Education 



Credits 

3 
3 

4 
4 



153 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics- Statics 

EC 301 Microeconomics-' (H&SS Elec. 2) 

GC 101 Engr. Graphics 1 

MA 242 Calculus 111 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 



Credits 
3 
3 
2 
4 
4 
16 



Spring Semester 

CE 215 Engr. Mechanics - Dynamics 

CE 3 1 3 Mechanics of Solids 

MAT 200 Mechanics Prop, of Struct Mat. 

ST 370 Probability and Statistics for Engrs. 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elect.' (H&SS Elec.3) 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 382 Hydraulics 

CE 463 Const. Estim. Planning & Control 

COM 146 Business & Prof Comm. or 

ENG 331 Communic. Enginr. & Tech 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics 1 

MAE 305 ME Lab 1 

MAE 316 Strength of Mech. Components 



Credits 
3 
3 

3 
3 
1 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

CE 367 Mech. & Elec. Sys. in Buildings 

CE 465 Construction Equipment & Methods 

MAE 302 Engr. Thermodynamics II 

MAE 306 ME Lab II 

MAE 310 Conduct. & Radiat. Heat Transfer 

Basic Science Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
4 
17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting or 
BUS 330 Human Resource Management 
CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 
ECE 331 Prin. of Electrical Engineering I 
MAE 406 Energy Conservation in Industry 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ (H&SS Elec. 4) 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ (H&SS Elec. 5) 



Spring Semester 

CE 469 Construction Engr. Project 

MAE 403 Air Conditioning 

MAE 421 Prin. of Solar Engr. 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elect.^ (H&SS Elec. 6) 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elect.-' (H&SS Elec. 7) 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Minimum Credit Hours Required for Graduation^: 128 



'Humanities and Social Science courses to be selected from the appropriate list approved by the College of Engineering. 

'Basic science elective: Select one: BIO 125, CH 201 & CH 202, or MEA 101 & MEA 1 10. 

'Foreign language proficiency at the FL_102 level will be required for graduation for all students admitted as freshmen or transfer students beginning the 

summer and fall of 1994. 

CURRICULUM IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Environmental Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 1 5 Intro, to Computing Environ 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus! 

EC 205 Fundamentals of Economics-' 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus 11 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics - Statics 
CH 221 Organic Chemistry I or 
CH 220 Intro. Organic Chemistry 
CHE 205 Chemical Process Prin. 
MA 242 Calculus 111 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 



Spring Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CE 215 Engr. Mechanics - Dynamics 

CE 280 Prin of Environmental Engr. 

CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 

MA 341 Applied Diff Equations I 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



154 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CE 374 Environmental Engr. Lab 2 CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 3 

CE 382 Hydraulics 3 CE 375 Civil Engr. Systems 3 

COM 1 10 Public Speaking or CE 381 Hydraulics Systems Meas, Lab 1 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 3 MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I or 

CSC 1 1 2 Intro, to Computing - FORTRAN or CHE 3 1 5 Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 

CSC 114 Intro, to Computing -C++ 3 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 3 

PY 208 Physics for Engines. & Sci. II 4 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 3 

15 16 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CE 383 Hydrology & Urban Water System 3 CE 342 Engr. Behavior of Soils 4 

CE 484 Water Supply & Waste Water Systems 3 CE 481 Environmental Engr. Project 3 

ST 360 Probability & Stat, for Engr. 3 Environmental Engineering Elective? 3 

Environmental Engr. Elective-" 3 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 3 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 3 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 3 

15 16 

Total Hours Required for Graduatiorh^: 128 

'Humanities & Social Science Courses to be selected from the appropriate list approved by the College of Engineering. 

^Environmental Engineering Elective to be selected from the appropriate list. 

'Foreign Language proficiency at the FL_102 level will be required for graduation for all students. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE www esc ncsu edu/ 

Withers Hall, Rooms 208 and 226 
Phone: (919)515-2858 

A L. Tharp, Head 

W. G. Scott Jr.. Assistant Head 

R. J. Fomaro, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

i. Hatch, Coordinator of Advising 

E. W. Davis, Jr., Director of Graduate Programs 

Distinguished University Research Professor: D.L. Bitzer;/4/umn/ Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: A.L. T\\aip,Emeritus Professors: DC. Martin, 
WE. Robbins; Professors: D.L. Bitzer, W. Chou, E.W. Davis, Jr., R.J. Fomaro, RE. Funderlic, D.F. McAllister, H.G. Perros, CD. Savage, W.J. Stewart, 
K.C. Tai, A.L. Tharp, MA. \ouV.,Asociate Professors: DR. Bahler, R.A. Dwyer, E.F. Gehringer, T.L. Honeycutt, S.P. Iyer, D.S. Reeves, R.D. Rodman, 
M.F. Stallmann; Assistant Professors: A.I. Anton, CO. Healey, V.E. Jones, J.C. Lester, I. Rhee, J.G. Rossie Jr., G.N. Rouskas, MP. Singh, R.A. St. Amant, 
S.F. Wu, R.M. Young; Visiting Research Professor: Franc Brglez;^i^uncr Professors: W.R. Cleaveland II, R.J. Plemmons;/)£^unc/ Assistant Professors: 
M. Aparicio IV, F. Gong, G.Q. Kenney, M. Singh, S.K. Singhal, A.O. Zaghloul;Z.€cmrer5. J. Hatch, T.E. Nelson, C.S. Miller, J.E. Perry, W.G. Scott Jr., 
Adjunct Lecturers: DP. Daugherty, M.S. Davis, D.J. Deter, JR. Holman, J.M. Lake, DA. Lasher, WD. Ruchte; O/rec/or of Multimedia Lab: D.H. Kekas; 
Research Assistants: J.C. Bass, D.S. Garriss, J.W. Riely, J.E. Robinson III, J. P. SXreck; Associate Members of the Department: J W. Baugh, Jr. (Civil 
Engineering), E. Kaltofen (Mathematics), CD. Meyer, Jr. (Mathematics), J.S. Scoggs (Mathematics), WE. Snyder (Electrical and Computer Engineering), I. 
Viniotis (Electrical and Computer Engineering). 

Computers and computing are ubiquitous in modem society. The discipline of computer science has evolved during the past three decades with the 
expanding role of computers New applications of computers continue to appear. They are used to design, manufacture and operate our automobiles, 
airplanes and spacecraft; to design our highways, bridges and buildings; to manage banking transactions; to help managers make decisions; to analyze farm 
production; to help the research scientist; and to monitor manufacturing processes, utilities and communication. Computer science is essential technology for 
tJie information superhighway and information services that will lead the economy into the 2 1st Century. 

OPPORTirNITIES 

Computer scientists have many career choices because of the diversity of computer use. A graduate may be involved in the design, implementation, or 
management of computer systems. Some may work more with advancing computer capabilities while others may adapt computers to new applications. 
Others may pursue advanced study. Some may wish to interact frequently with people, while others may not. For whatever your ambitions and preferences, 
computer science offers opportunities. 

CURRICULA 

This undergraduate curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. This program is accredited by the Computer Science 
Accreditation Commission of the Computing Sciences Acreditation Board , a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary 
Accreditation and the US Department of Education. Core courses provide the fundamentals of programming concepts, computer science theory, data 
structures, computer organization, operating systems, and software engineering. Restricted electives, chosen in consultation with one's advisor during the 
junior year, allow exploration of specific computer science subareas such as database management systems, operating systems, graphics, multimedia 
technology, artificial intelligence, networks and World Wide Web (WWW) topics, computer-human interfaces and architecture. Students in another 
department may select courses in computer science as electives to broaden their programs of study and to learn how to use the computer for solving 
problems. 



155 



CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 
Degree earned: B.S. in Computer Science 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry- A Molecular Science' 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 



Fall Semester 

CSC 210 Prog. Lang. Concepts' 

CSC 222 Appl. Discrete Math' 

MA 242 Calculus 111 

PY 208 General Physics II 

Physical Education 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credits 
3 
1 

1 
3 
4 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

CSC 1 14 Intro, to Comp. - C++ 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading' 

MA 241 Calculus ir 

PY 205 General Physics 1' 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
15 



Spring Semester 

CSC 201 Comp. Org. & Assem. Lang 

CSC 311 Data Structures 

MA 305 Intro, to Linear Algebra 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 

Basic Science Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
IS 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CSC 202 Operating Systems 

CSC 333 Automata Theory^ or 

CSC 302 Intro, to Numerical Methods 

CSC Restricted Elective' 

ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 



ts Spring Semester 

3 CSC 3 1 Software Engineering 

CSC Restricted Elective' 

3 EC 305 Fundamentals of Economics or 

3 EC 201 Prin. of Microecon. or 

3 ARE 201 Intro, to Agric. & Resource Econ. 

1 ST 370 Probability & Statistics for Engineers 

15 Other Restricted Elective' 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
CSC Restricted Elective' 
CSC 4** Project Course' 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elecitve' 
Other Restricted Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 
CSC 379 Ethics in Computing 
CSC Restricted Elective' 
CSC Restricted Elective' 
Other Restricted Elective' 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
Free Elective 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 



Credits 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
15 

120' 



' D grades are not accepted in CH 101, 121, CSC 1 14, 210,222, MA 141, 241, ENG 1 1 1, 1 12 and PY 205. 

' See College of Engineering list of Humanities and Social Sciences requirements. 

' To be selected from CH 201 , PY 228 or any BO, BIO, MEA or ZO. 

*. Select either CSC 302 or CSC 333 as a core course. 

' ACC (210 or 280), plus all 300-level courses except 300; BCH 451; all 300- and 400-level BUS courses except 350; CE 214; CHE 425, 465; CSC 251, 

254, 255, 257, 295, 302, 312, (cannot use both ECE 212 and CSC 312 for graduation requirements in CSC), 333, 340, plus all 300- and 500-level courses; all 

300-,400- and 500-level EC courses; ECE 211, 2I2(cannot use both ECE 212 and CSC 312 for graduation requirements in CSC), plus all 300-, 400- and 500 

level courses; EMS 480; GC 200, 300, 320, 420; GN 41 1 plus all 500-level courses; IE 307, 308, 3 1 1 or 361 plus all 400-and 500-level courses; MA (301 or 

341), 302, 351 plus all 400- and 500-level courses with prerequisites at the 200 level or higher except 421 and 433; all 200-level and higher MAE courses; 

MAT 201 plus all 300- and 400-level courses; MDS 306; MUS 306; all 300- and 400-level NE courses; all 500-level OR courses; PM 335 or 425; PSY 307, 

340, 400, 410, 420 or 425; all PY 400- and 500-level courses; ST 372 plus all 400- and 500-level courses. 

'. To be selected from CSC 402, 432, 452, 462, 472, 492. 

' The GPA earned in all courses attempted at NCSU must be 2.000 or higher to satisfy university graduation requirement. In addition, the College of 

Engineering requires either 'a GPA or 2.000 or higher in all courses bearing the CSC designation or * a grade of C or higher in each CSC course used to 

satisfy the requirements in the major. 

Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 

MINOR IN COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 

The Department of Computer Science offers a Minor in Computer Programming to undergraduate majors in any field except computer science and computer 
engineering. Undergraduates will be admitted to the Minor only if they have an overall GPA of at least 2.25. The Minor consists of the completion with a 
grade ofC or higher of E 115 (S/U grading), CSC 114, 201,202, 210, 222, 311, and MA 121 (or any college calculus course). At least five of these eight 
courses must be taken at NC State. 



156 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING www.ece ncsu.edu/ 

Daniels Hall, Room 232 
Phone: (919)515-2336 

R. M. Kolbas, Head 

J. J. Brickley, ix. Associate Head 

R. T. Kuehn, Director of Graduate Programs 

C. W. Townsend, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Distinguished University Professor: B.J. Baliga; Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering: N.A. Masnari; University Professor: 
JR. Hauser. Ahimni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: M.A. Littlejohn, Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professsor: J.B O'Neal, ix. Professors: D.P. 
Agrawa;. W.E. Alexander, B.J. Baliga, S.M. Bedair, P.D. Franzon, T.H. Glisson, J.J. Grainger, JR. Hauser, J.F. Kauffman, K.W. Kim, R.M. Koulbas, M.A. 
Littlejohn, W.T. Liu, T.K. Miller, H.T. Nagle, Jr., A.A. Nilsson, J.B. O'Neal, Jr., CM. Osbum, M.C. Ozturk, S.A. Rajala, W. E. Snyder, MB. Steer, H. J. 
Trussell; Visting Research Professor: W.C. \\o\lor\\ Adjunct Professors: D. Bradley, R.M. Burger, R.K. Cavin III, Mitra Dutta, R.C. Luo, W. Lynch, M. A. 
Stroscio, J. Suttle; Professors Emeriti: A.J. Goetze, N.F.J. Mattews, L.K. Monteith, A. Reisman, DR. Rliodes, A. Vanderlugt, J.J. ^ onxnan: Associate 
Professors: S.T. Alexander, G.L. Bilbao, M.Y. Chow, T. Conte, A. Duel-Hallen, E.F. Gehringer, B.L. Hughes, A.W. Kelley, A.M. Mortazawi, D.S. Reeves, 
J.K. Townsend, I. Viniotis, M.W. White; Visiting Associate Professor: J.J. Brickley, T.L. Mitchell; Adjunct Associate Professors: J.R. Burke, R.J. Evans, 
R.S. Gyurcsik, S-H Lee. H. Massoud, D. Jirx\f\i, Associate Professors Emeriti: W.T. Easter, E.G. M3Rmx\%,\ Assistant Professors: M.E. Baran, G. Byrd, A. 
Eichenberger. C.S. Gloster, Jr., A.H. Krim, V. Misra; Visiting Assistant Professors: B. Allen, R.T. Kuehn, J. Muth, HO. Ozturk; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: L.J. Bottomley, W. Chimiak, J.M. Conrad, D. L. Dreiftis, J.A. Freebersyser, M.J. Gorman, D.W. Hislop, P.K. McLarty, K.J. Molnar, A. 
Montalvo, AS. Morris, III, D. Novosel, R. O. Onvural, S. Rampal, A. J. Rindos III, P. Santago, J.C. Sutton, C.K. V/'Mams;Visiting Lecturers: E. Grant, 
C.W. Towx\ser\i: Adjunct Lecturer: C. Sastre; Research Associates: R. Hamaker, F.G. Mcintosh, P. O'Neil, J.C. Roberts, D.G. Yu;Research Assistants: E. 
S. Condon, T. McNulty, G. Saunders, J.M. O'Sullivan, M. Xu;Associate Members of the Department: D. Bitzer (Computer Science), S. Blanchard (Bio & 
Agri.),E. Davis (Computer Science), J. Herbert (Multidisciplinary Studies), W. Jasper (Textiles), G. Lucovsky (Physics), D. McAllistar (Computer Science), 
J. Narayan (Materials Science and Engineering), H. Perros (Computer Science), W. Robbins (Computer Science), J. F. Schetzina (Physics), M. Stallman 
(Computer Science), K-C Tai (Computer Science), M. Vouk (Computer Science). 

The professions of electrical engineering and computer engineering are concerned with the analysis, design, construction and testing of systems based on 
electrical phenomena. In contemporary technological society, electrical methods are used to communicate and store information, control equipment and 
systems, perform mathematical operations, and convert energy from one form to another. Frequently, two or more of these functions are important in the 
design of systems such as television, radio, telecommunications, computers, robots and intelligent machines, telemetry systems, solid-state electronics, 
biomedical devices, environmental controls, electric machinery, and electric power generation and transmission facilities. Computer engineering is a field in 
which digital techniques are used in system design. Low-cost solid state microprocessors and memories permit computers to be widely incorporated in many 
different types of electronic systems. To work effectively in this rapidly growing field, the computer engineer must understand both hardware and software 
techniques and must efTectively use both techniques in order to design, build and test complex digital systems. Both the electrical engineering and the 
computer engineering programs, which lead respectively to the degrees. Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Computer 
Engineering, are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Superior academic performance is recognized within this department in three ways: election of students to membership in the electrical engineering honor 
society. Eta Kappa Nu; awarding of merit scholarships; and presentation of awards to outstanding seniors. The department has one endowed merit 
scholarship for entering freshmen, the Eugene C. and Winifred Sakshaug Scholarship, and eight endowed scholarships which are usually awarded to juniors 
and seniors: Elizabeth P. Cockrell, L. A. Mahler, Amelia N. Mitta, Frank T. Pankotay, William DeRosset Scott III, E. Chester Seewald, North Carolina 
Electric Membership Corporation, and William D. Stevenson, Jr., the latter two of which are for students studying electric power systems. The department 
also from time to time has scholarships provided by industrial organizations such as the Alcoa Foundation, General Motors Corporation and United 
Technologies Research Center. Academic merit is generally the primary requirement for these awards, but other characteristics, such as demonstrated 
leadership, may also be specified. In addition, the endowed William M. Gates Scholarship Program provides multiple scholarships for students having 
documented financial need and high academic performance. These are awarded each fall to juniors, with provision for continuation in the senior year. 

FACILITIES 

Many courses are accompanied by coordinated laboratory work and projects. These assignments typically focus on real-world systems and problems and 
involve computer simulation and analysis, design, development and testing of hardware and software associated with electrical, electronic, and 
elecfromechanical systems, circuits and devices. Extensive facilities are provided for experimental study of analog and digital circuits, microprocessors, 
computers, electrical machinery, VLSI devices, robots and intelligent machines, telecommunications, and microwave systems. The EOS System, a network 
of state-of-the-art engineering workstations, provides a powerftil computing environment available to all students. Two EOS laboratories with more than 
sixty workstations, mostly color, are located within the department Electrical and Computer Engineering provides knowledgeable attendants in these 
laboratories up to eighteen hours a day. A student may log in at over 500 workstations located in these two laboratories and several other facilities 
throughout the College of Engineering. Powerful software is provided on the system for engineering analysis, design and testing, symbolic mathematics, 
sophisticated color graphics, scientific spreadsheets, programming languages, word processing, document formatting and other special applications. The 
department has an Undergraduate Design Center which provides resources for required industry-sponsored, semester-long design projects. Weekly sessions 
are scheduled in the Undergraduate Teaching Center by teaching assistants to answer student questions about course material. Both centers are equipped 
with EOS workstations. 

CORE COURSES 

The electrical and computer engineering curricula share core courses comprising a substantial portion of the first three years of study. Strong emphasis is 
placed on fundamental concepts in core courses so that graduates are prepared for rapid technological changes common in the electrical and computer 
engineering professions. A comprehensive foundation in mathematics and the physical sciences in the freshman year is followed in subsequent years by 
additional core courses in mathematics, physics, electric circuit theory, digital logic, computer systems, electronics, linear systems, and mechanics. 
Laboratory work is designed to demonstrate fundamental principles and to provide experience in designing and testing electronic hardware and computer 
software. Both curricula have required senior design courses which give students comprehensive experience in designing, building and testing physical 
systems. 

CURRICULA 

In addition to the core courses described above, students in the electrical engineering curriculum take courses in electromagnetic fields and solid-state 
devices or electric power systems in their junior year and thermodynamics in their senior year. Students must take four courses of their choice in their senior 

157 



year from more that 20 elective courses offered in communications, control systems, digital systems, electric power systems, electromagnetics, 
microelectronics, and robotics. 

In addition to the core courses described above, students in the computer engineering curriculum take courses in discrete mathematics, design of complex 
digital systems, advanced programming, operating systems, and data structures in their sophomore and junior years. Students must take three courses of their 
choice in the senior year. A variety of elective courses are offered in communications, controls, digital systems, microelectronics, and VLSI design. In 
addition, several senior-level courses in computer science are approved as elective courses for computer engineering. 



CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Degree earned: B.S. in Electrical Engineering 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semsler 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 

CH 121 General Chemstry I Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Spring Semester 

CSC 1 14 Intro, to Comp - C++ 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc. I 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
IS 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

COM 110 Public Speaking 

ECE21I Electric Circuits I 

ECE 213 Electric Circuits I Lab 

MA 242 Analytical Geom. & Calc. Ill 

PY 208 Physics Engrs. & Sci. II 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CE 213 Introduction to Mechanics 

3 ECE 212 Fund. Logic Design 

1 ECE 2 1 4 Fund. Logic Design Lab 

4 ECE 22 1 Electric Circuits II 

4 ECE 223 Electric Circuits II Lab 

15 MA 341 Differential Equations 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3 
3 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ECE 301 Linear Systems 

ECE 303 Electromagnetic Fids. 

ECE 314 Electronic Circuits 

MA 302 Num. Appl. to Diff. Equations 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ECE 2 1 8 Comp. Org. & Microproc. 

3 ECE 305 Electric Pwr. Sys. or 

3 ECE 341 Solid State Devices 

I ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

3 ST 370 Prob. & Stat, for Engr. 

3 Humanites/Soc.Sci. Elective 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

COM 30 1 Presentational Speaking 

Approved Tech. Elective 

Sr. ECE Design Elective 

Sr. ECE Design Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ECE 480 EE Sr. Design Elective 

3 Sr. Design Elective or 

3 Approved Dept. Elective 

3 Approved Dept. Elective 

3 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

15 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 125* 

Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 



CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Computer Engineering 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 

CH 121 General Chemistry I Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Any 100-level PE course in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
I 

I 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CSC 1 14 Intro, to Computing - C++ 

ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc. I 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
IS 



138 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CSC 210 Concepts of Prog. Lang, 

ECE 212 Fund, of Logic Des. 

ECE 214 Fund of Logic Des. Lab 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sc. II 



Credits Spring Semsler 

3 CSC 222 Discrete Math Structures 

3 ECE 211 Elect. Circuits 1 

1 ECE 2 1 3 Elect. Circuits 1 Lab 

4 ECE218Comp. Org. &Microproc. 
4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 
15 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Fall Semester 

CSC 202 Concep. & Fac. of Op. Sys. 

ECE 221 Elect. Circuits II 

ECE 223 Elect. Circuits II Lab 

ECE 342 Des. Complex Digit. Sys. 

ST 370 Prob. & Stat, for Engr. 

Comm. Elective 



Fall Semester 
Approved Tech. Elective 
Senior Elective 
Senior Design Elective 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



JUNIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 CSC 311 Data Structures 


3 


3 ECE 301 Linear Systems 


3 


I ECE 314 Electronic Ckts. 


3 


3 ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 


3 


3 MA 302 Numerical App. to Diff. Equations 


1 


3 Humanities/Social Science Elect. 


3 


16 


16 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 ECE 48 1 CPE Senior Design Project 


4 


3 CPE Senior Elective 


3 


3 CPE Senior Elective 


3 


3 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 


3 


3 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 


3 


15 


16 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 125* 

'Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 

CURRICULUM FOR DUAL DEGREE: BS ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING/MS MANAGEMENT 
Degrees earned: B.S. Electrical Engineering and M.S. Management 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 General Chemistry 1(1) 

CH 121 General Chemistry 1 Lab(l) 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric(l) 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective(3) 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness(2) 



Fall Semester 

COM 110 Public Speaking 

ECE 211 Electric Circuits 1(1) 

ECE 2 1 3 Electric Circuits I Lab 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus HI 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 



Fall Semester 

ECE 301 Linear Systems 

ECE 305 Electric Power Systems or 

ECE 341 Solid State Devices 

ECE 314 Electronic Circuits 

MA 302 Num Applic. to Diff. Equations 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics 

EC 201 Economics I 



Spring Semester 

CSC 1 14 Intro, to Comp - C++ 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus 11(1) 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. 1(1) 

Physical Education 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

3 CE 2 1 3 Intro, to Mechanics (4) 

3 ECE 2 1 2 Fund, of Logic Des.( 1 ) 

1 ECE214Fund. of Logic Des. Lab 

4 ECE 22 1 Electric Circuits 11(1) 
4 ECE 223 Electric Circuits II Lab 
16 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



JUNIOR YEAR 

its Spring Semester 

3 ECE218Comp. Org. &Microproc.(l) 

ECE 303 Electromagnetic Fields 
3 ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

1 ST 370 Prob. & Statistics for Engineers(5) 

1 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Electives 

3 
3 
16 

159 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
I 
15 



Credits 
3 
3 
I 
3 
1 
3 
3 
17 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ACC 581 Financial Accounting 
ACC 582 Managerial Accounting 
COM 301 Presentational Speaking 
ECG 507 Microecon. & Bus. Environ. 
Approved Technical Elective 
Senior ECE Design Elective 
Senior ECE Design Elective 



Credits 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Spring Semester 
ECE 480 EE Sr. Design Project 
ECE 4*'or 5** Master's Tech. Option 
ECE 4**or 5** Master's Tech. Option 
ECG 508 Macroecon. & Bus. Environ. 
Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 
15 



Fall Semester 

BUS 501 Legal and Regulatory Environ. 

BUS 502 Global and Cultural Environ.(9) 

BUS 521 Mangerial Finance 

BUS 531 Managerical Proc. & Effectiveness 

BUS 541 Mgmt. Info. Sys. 

BUS 561 Marketing Mgmt. & Strat. 

BUS 571 Operations Mgmt. 



Credits 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
14 



Spring Semester 

BUS 532 Strategic Human Res. Mgmt. 

BUS 533 Leadership 

BUS 574 Management of Technology(9) 

BUS 581 Long Range Analysis & Strat. 

BUS 583 Management Practicum 

ECE 5'** Master's Technical Option 



Credits 
2 
3 
2 
3 
1 
3 
14 



Total Hours Required for BSEE 

Total Hours Required for MSM 

Total Hours Required for both BSEE & MSM 

Credits Counting Towards Both Degrees 

Credits Required for MSM beyond BSEE 



125 
45 
155 
15 
30 



Notes: 

*AI1 students entering the program after the spring semester of 1994 must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at the FL_102 level for graduation. 

"Studentselecting to takeCE215 or MAE 208 as a technical elective must take CE 214 or MAE 206 instead of CE 213. 

'Master's Tech Option must be approved by the ECE Undergraduate Coordinator of Advising as Approved ECE Departmental Electives and by the 

student's master's program committee as appropriate Master's Technical Option courses 

*The sequence, ECG 507 - ECG 508. satisfies the HSS requirement for an advanced social science course in economics for the BSEE program. 

*The sequence, BUS 502 - BUS 574, satisfies the HSS requirement for a STS course for the BSEE program. 

•Courses counting toward both degrees are ST 370(3), BUS 502 (1.5of 2.0), ECG 507 (1.5 of 2.0), ECG 508 (1.5 of 2.0), and ECE 4** or ECE 5** (6). 

CURRICULUM FOR DUAL DEGREE: BS COMPUTER ENGINEERING/MS MANAGEMENT 
Degree earned: B.S. Computer Engineering and M.S. Management 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



CH 1 1 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environment 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 

Any 100-level PE crs. in Fitness & Wellness 



Fall Semester 



CSC 210 Concepts of Prog. Lang. 
ECE 212 Fund, of Logic Design 
ECE 214 Fund, of Logic Design Lab 
MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III 
PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 



Credits 
3 
1 

1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Spring Semester 

CSC 114 Intro, to Computing - C++ 
ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 
MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II 
PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. 1 
Physical Education 



Credits 

3 
3 
1 

4 
4 
15 



CSC 222 Discrete Math Structures 
ECE 211 Elecu-ic Circuits I 
ECE 213 Elecu-ic Circuits I Lab 
ECE 218 Comp. Org. & Microproc. 
MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 
Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Spring Semester 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
15 



Credits 

3 

3 

1 

3 

3 

3 

16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



CSC 202 Concep. & Fac. of Op. Systems 
ECE 221 Electric Circuits II 
ECE 223 Electric Circuits II Lab 
ECE 342 Des. Complex Digit Sys. 
ST 370 Prob. & Stat. For Engr. 
Comm. Elective 



Credits Spring Semester Credits 

3 CSC 31 1 Data Structures 3 

3 ECE 301 Linear Systems 3 

2 ECE 3 14 Electronic Ckts. 3 

3 ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 3 
3 MA 302 Numerical App. To Diff. Equations 1 
3 EC 201 Economics I 3 
16 16 



160 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ACC 581 Financial Accounting 
ACC 582 Managerial Accounting 
Humanities/Social Science Elective 
EG 507 Microecon. & Bus. Environ. 
Approved Technical Elective 
Senior ECE Design Elective 
Senior ECE Elective 



Credits 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
18 



Spring Semester 

ECE 481 CPE Senior Design Project 
ECE 4** or 5** Master's Tech. Option 
ECE 4** or 5** Master's Tech. Option 
ECG 508 Macroecon. & Business Environ. 
Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 
IS 



Fall Semester 

BUS 501 Legal and Regulatory Environ. 

BUS 502 Global and Cultural Environ. 

BUS 521 Managerial Finance 

BUS 53 1 Managerial Proc. & Effectiveness 

BUS 541 Management Info. Sys. 

BUS 561 Marketing Mgmt. & Strat. 

BUS 471 Operations Mgmt. 



Credits 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
14 



Spring Semester 

BUS 532 Strategic Human Res. Mgmt. 

BUS 533 Leadership 

BUS 574 Management of Technolgy 

BUS 581 Long Range Analysis & Strat. 

BUS 583 Management Practicum 

BUS 5*' Master's Technical Option 



Credits 
2 
3 
2 
3 

3 
14 



Total Hours Required for BSCPE 125* 

Total Hours Required for IMSIM 45 

Total Hours Required for both BSCPE & MSM 155 

Credits Counting Towards Both Degrees 15 

Credits Required for MSM beyond BSCPE 30 

• Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at the 102 level. Master's Tech. Option must be 

approved by the ECE Undergraduate Coordinator of Advising as Approved ECE 

Departmental Electives and by the student's master's program committee as appropriate Master's Technical Option courses. 

The sequence, ECG 507 - ECG 508, satisfies the HSS requirement for an advanced social science course in economics for the BSCPE program. 

The sequence, BUS 502 - BUS 574, satisfies the HSS requirement for a STS course for the BSCPE program. 

Courses counting toward both degrees are ST 307 (3), BUS 502 (1.5 of 2), BUS 574 (1.5 of 2), ECG 507 (1.5 of 2), ECG 508 (1.5 of 2), and ECE 4" or 

ECE 5** (6). 

CURRICULUM FOR DUAL DEGREE: BS ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING/MS ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Degrees earned: B.S. Electrical Engineering and M.S. Electrical Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environment 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness and Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 

I 
3 
4 
3 
I 
16 



Spring Semester 

CSC 1 14 Intro, to Comp - C++ 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
IS 



SOPHOMORE -VTAR 



Fall Semester 

COM 110 Public Speaking 

ECE 211 Electric Circuits I 

ECE 213 Electric Circuits I Lab 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics Engrs. & Sci. II 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CE 213 Introduction to Mechanics 

3 ECE 212 Fund. Logic Design 

I ECE 214 Fund. Logic Design Lab 

4 ECE 221 Electric Circuits II 

4 ECE 223 Electric Circuits II Lab 

15 MA 341 Differential Equations 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3 
3 
17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ECE 301 Linear Systems 

ECE 303 Electromagnetic Fids. 

ECE 314 Electronic Circuits 

MA 302 Num Appl. To Diff. Equations 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ECE 218 Comp. Org. & Microproc. 

3 ECE 305 Electric Pwr. Sys. or 

3 ECE 341 Solid State Devices 

1 ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

3 ST 370 Prob. & Stat, for Engr. 

3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 
16 

161 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

COM 301 Presentational Speaking 

Approved Tech. Elective 

Graduate Elective 

Graduate Elective 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

ECE 480 EE Sr. Design Elective 

Graduate Elective 

Graduate Elective 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Fall Semester 
Graduate Electives 



Spring Semester 
Graduate Electives 



Total Hours Required for BSEE 

Total Hours Required for MSEE 

Total Hours Required for both BSEE & MSEE 

Credits Counting Towards Both Degrees 

Credits Required for MSEE beyond BSEE 



*Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 
The first 12 hours of graduate electives must be approved by the ECE Undergraduate Coordinator of Advising. 



9 
9 

125* 
30 
143 
12 
18 



CURRICULUM FOR DUAL DEGREE: B.S. COMPUTER ENGINEERING/M.S. COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

Degrees earned: B.S. Computer Engineering and M.S. Computer Engineering 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calculus 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 

1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



■C++ 



Spring Semester 

CSC 1 14 Intro, to Computing - 

ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
IS 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CSC 2 1 Concepts of Prog. Lang. 

ECE 212 Fund, of Logic Des. 

ECE 214 Fund, of Logic Des. Lab 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CSC 222 Discrete Math Structures 

3 ECE 211 Elect. Circuits I 

1 ECE 213 Elect. Circuits I Lab 

4 ECE 2 1 8 Comp. Org. & Microproc. 
4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 
15 Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
16 



Fall Semester 

CSC 202 Concep. & Fac. of Op. Sys. 
ECE 221 Elect. Circuits II 
ECE 223 Elect. Circuits II Lab 
ECE 342 Des. Complex Digit. Sys. 
ST 370 Prob. & Stat, for Engr. 
Comm. Elective 



Fall Semester 

Approved Tech. Elective 
Graduate Elective 
Graduate Elective 
Humanities/Social Science Elective 
Humanities/Social Science Elect4ive 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

3 CSC 3 1 1 Data Structures 

3 ECE 301 Linear Systems 

1 ECE 314 Electronic Ckts. 

3 ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

3 MA 302 Numerical App. to Diff. Equations 

3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 

16 

SENIOR YEAR 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Spring Semester 

ECE 481 CPE Senior Design Project 
Graduate Elective 
Graduate Elective 
Humanities/Social Science Elective 
Humanities/Social Science Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
16 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



162 



Fall Semester 
Graduate Electives 



Spring Semester 
Graduate Electives 



Credits 
9 
9 



Total Hours Required for BSCPE 

Total Hours Required for MSCPE 

Total Hours Required for both BSCPE & MSCPE 

Credits Counting Towards Both Degrees 

Credits Required for MSCPE beyond BSCPE 

*Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 
The first 12 hours of graduate electives must be approved by the ECE Undergraduate Coordinator of Advisisng. 



125* 
30 
143 
12 
18 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

RIddick Engineering Laboratories, Room 328 
Phone: (919)515-2362 



www.ie.ncsu.edu/ 



S. D. Roberts, Head 

C. L. Smith, Assistant Head and Director of Undergraduate Programs 

i. R. Wilson, Director of Graduate Programs 

Henry A. Foscue Professor: C.T. Culbreth; University Professor: S.E. Elmaghraby; Walter Clark Professor: S.C. Fang; James T. Ryan Professor: T.J. 
Hodgson; Professors: MA. Ayoub, R.H. Bemhard, RE. King, W.L. Meier, H.L.W. Nuttle, R.G. Pearson, S.D. Roberts, JR. VJWsonJ'rofessors Emeriti: 
R.E. Alvarez, C.A. Anderson, JR. Canada, R.W. Llewellyn, A. L. Prak, W.A. Smith, h.Jssociate Professors: Y. Fathi, M.G. Kay, G.A. Mirka, E.T. Sanii, 
RE. Young; Assistant Professors: D.R. Cormier, Y.S. Lee, J.B. Taylor, CM. Sommerich; Lecturer: C.L. Smith. 

The industrial engineer designs, improves, and installs integrated systems of people, materials, equipment, and information, drawing upon specialized 
knowledge and skill in the mathematical, physical and social sciences, together with the principles and methods of engineering analysis and design to 
specify, predict and evaluate the results to be obtained from these systems. Productivify, cost, quality, and time are the principal concerns While industrial 
engineering is focused on the manufacturing enterprise, industrial engineers are widely employed in service industries including hospitals, banks, insurance, 
and government, owing to the emphasis on systems engineering. Because industrial engineering concentrates on management systems, lE's are quick to 
move into management and they are ideal candidates for management consulting firms. 

The curriculum blends a basic group of common engineering technical courses with specialized courses in the major design areas of industrial engineering 
consisting of manufacturing operations, human-based workplaces, production systems, and management control. The course offerings stress mathematical 
and statistical techniques of systems analysis; computing as a tool for problem-solving and simulation; economic analysis of processes; control of process, 
product, or service qualify and production; manufacturing process specification; and workplace design for ergonomic health and safefy. 

The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, Furniture Manufacturing prepares graduates for both engineering and managerial positions in the 
furniture industry. The furniture industry is one of the largest industries in North Carolina. The curriculum offers industrial engineering students a 
concentrated study of the materials, products, and processes of the furniture industry 

Cl'RRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Industrial Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fimess & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 

1 
3 
4 
3 
1 



Spring Semester 

CSC 114 Intro, to Comp. - C++ 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sc. 1 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

lE/CG 210 Engr. Graphics 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics-Statics 

MA 242 Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

ST 371 Intro. Prob. & Dist. Theory 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ECE 331 Prin. of Electrical Engr. 

3 MA 303 Linear Analysis 

4 MAT 200 Struc. & Prop. Engr. Materials 
4 ST 372 Intro. Stat. Infer. & Regres. 

3 Engr. Science Elective 

17 IE 216 Manufacturing Engr. Practicum 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



163 



Fall Semester 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 
IE 3 16 Mfg. Engr. I - Processes 
IE/CSC 441 Work Analysis & Design 
IE 361 Deter. Models in IE 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Fall Semester 

IE 308 Cont. of Prod. & Ser. Sys. 
IE 31 1 Engr. Economic Analysis 
IE417Mfg. Engr. III-CM 
IE 452 Facilities Design 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



JUNIOR YEAR 


Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 


Spring Semester 

IE 416 Mfg. Engr. II - Automation 

IE 352 Work Analysis & Design 

IE 443 Quality Control 

IE 452 Ergonomics 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 


SENIOR YEAR 


Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 


Spring Semester 
IE 498 Senior Design Project 
IE 401 Stochastic Models in IE 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 126* 

*Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 

MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

The minor in Industrial Engineering is designed to provide undergraduate engineering students and other science majors in curricula other than Industrial 
Engineering with the fundamentals of industrial engineering necessary for advanced study in the discipline and/or employment in industrial engineering 
related occupations. The minor in Industrial Engineering offers a structured program that allows students to acquire some level of expertise in areas common 
to all industrial engineers as well as a deeper knowledge in at least one specific area of interest. 

This minor requires a minimum of 15 credit hours. Required credit hours total six and consist of IE 31 1 and any 400-level IE course. Elective hours total 
nine and must come from remaining IE designated courses. The GPA for the minor courses must be at least 2.0. Applications may be obtained from the 
Department of Industrial Engineering Undergraduate Office. 

MINOR IN FURNITURE MANUFACTURING 

The minor in Furniture Manufacturing is open to all undergraduate degree students at NC State who are interested in gaining specialized knowledge of 
furniture product engineering and related manufacturing processes and design. A set of four cohesive courses provides for a concentrated study of this 
manufacturing industry as well as the application of industrial engineering fundamentals. 

This minor requires a minimum of 1 5 credit hours. Required credit hours total 1 2 and consist of IE 240, IE 24 1 , IE 340, and IE 34 1 . Elective hours total 
three and must come from the following: IE 307, IE 308, IE 31 1, IE 352, IE 361, IE 441, IE 443, or IE 452. The GPA for the minor courses must be at least 
2.0. Applications may be obtained from the Department of Industrial Engineering Undergraduate Office. 



CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, Furniture Manufacturing 
Degree earned: B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Furniture Manufacturing 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 

CH 121 General Chemistry 1 Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Spring Semester 

CSC 1 14 Intro, to Comp. - C++ 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr & Sci. 1 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
IS 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 214 Engr. Mechanics-Statics 

lE/GC 210 Engr Graphics 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

ST 371 Intro. Prob. & Dist. Theory 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3 
17 



Spring Semester 

ECE 331 Principle of Electrical Engr. 

MA 303 Linear Analysis 

ST 372 Intro. Stat. Infer. & Regres. 

Engr. Science Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



164 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

IE 240 Fum. Prod. Engr. 

IE 441 Intro, to Simulation 

IE 361 Deter Models in IE 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

IE 241 Fum. Mfg. Proc. I 

IE 352 Work Analysis & Design 

IE 443 Quality Control 

IE 452 Ergonomics 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

IE 308 Com. of Prod. & Ser. Sys. 

IE 3 1 1 Engr. Economic Analysis 

IE 340 Fum. Mfg. Proc. II 

IE 41 7 Mfg. Engr. Ill - Automation 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 
IE 498 Senior Design Project 
IE 341 Fum. Plant Layout 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
12 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 125* 

Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 

COMBINED B.S.-IV1IE/IV!SIE In Industrial Engineering PROGRAM 

This program will allow students to complete both undergraduate and graduate degrees within five years. The student may elect to pursue the Traditional 
BS or Combined BS-MIE/MSIE Program at the start of their senior year. The student is allowed up to 12 credit hours to be counted towards both the 
undergraduate and graduate degrees. In addition, up to 6 credit hours of graduate level classes eamed as an undergraduate may be applied toward the 
Master's degree for a maximum total of 18 credits; thereby, shortening the time required to earn the Master's degree. 

Requirements: 

1. Have completed 92 credit hours (i.e. Senior) by the end of the current semester (includes transfer credits.) 

2. Eamed a GPA of at least 3.25 for all courses and 3.25 for all Industrial Engineering courses. 

3. Satisfied all prerequisite requirements for 400 level courses. 

4. A letter of recommendation from the undergraduate teaching advisor identifying the applicant as participation in the BS-MS/MSIE program 
should accompany the application as well as the course numbers and titles of the 12 credits hours to be used for both the Bachelor's and 
Master's degree programs. 

Whether in the traditional BS or Combined BS-MIE/MSIE, ABET and University requirements will be satisfied based upon the four (4) year curriculum. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories, Room 229 
Phone:(919)515-2377 



www.mse.ncsu.edu/ 



J. M. Rigsbee, Head 

C. C. Koch, Associate Head, and Director of Graduate Programs 

D. M. Maher, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

Kobe Steel Professor. R.F. Davis; University Distinguished Professor : i. Narayan; Distinguished Research Professor. J.J. Cuomo; Professors: K. 
Bachmann, R.B. Benson Jr.. N. El-Masry. J.J. Hren, A.I. Kingon, C.C. Koch, K.L. Murty, J.M. Rigsbee, G.A. Rozgonyi. P.E. Russell, R.O. Scattergood; 
Professors Emeriti: WW. Austin. H. Conrad, A.A. Fahmy, J.K. Magor. K.L. Moazed. H. Palmour 111, H.H. Stadelmaier, R.F. Stoops; I'li/r/ng Professors: 
J.Russ, R.B.Tippin; /l(^unc/ Professors: O. Auciello, G.L. Doll, J.T. Glass, J.T. Prater, R. Reeber, F. S\i\\mvaa\ Research Professor : D. Maher; Associate 
Professors: CM. Balik, D.W. Brenner, J. Kasichainula, Z. Sitar, R. Sponlak;Associate Professor Emeritus: J. Hamme; Visiting Associate Professor : D. 
Griffis; Adjunct Associate Professor : S. S,mA}\: Lecturer : T.M. Hare; Adjunct Lecturer: C. Chiklis; Associate Members of the Faculty: D. Aspnes (Physics), 
J.A.Bailey (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering). S.M.Bedair (Electrical and Computer Engineering), K.S. Havner (Professor of Civil Engineering), Y. 
Horie (Civil Engineering), H. Lamb (Chemical Engineering), G. Lucovsky (Physics), R.J. Nemanich (Physics), G. Parsons (Chemical Engineering), A. 
Reisman (Electrical and Computer Engineering), 1. Rovner (Sociology and Anthropology), V.T. Stannett ( Chemical ^i\%\t\eenng)lnterinstitutional Adjunct 
Faculty. J. Sankar (NC A&T State University). 

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers programs to qualify graduates for positions in industry, R&D laboratories, educational 
institutions, and governmental agencies. This basic education involves design, development, selection, and processing of engineered materials. Industries 
served by materials science and engineering graduates are aerospace, automotive, chemical and chemical processing, communications, construction 
materials, electronics, energy production, manufacturing, nuclear, and transportation. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The continuing industrial and technological growth of the United States, the general southeast, and in particular the State of North Carolina has been marked 
by a strong and increasing demand for materials scientists and engineers. Modem technological advances require new materials and novel processing and/or 
fabrication methods. At the national level, materials research is prominently mentioned in most lists of critical or enabling technologies. As our 
understanding of materials science advances, common features and elements tend to unite many different industries. As an example, consider that our current 
knowledge of silicon is necessary in the electronics, photovoltaics, optical fiber technologies, lasers, pollution control, and biomedical industries. Advanced 
understanding of polymers also crosses and unites several different industries such as plastics, textiles, electronics, and recycling. 

Education in materials science and engineering provides career opportunities in a wide range of industries from those which produce and/or use metals, 
glass, polymers, or ceramics, to those which use such materials in an integrated fashion such as the microelectronics industry. These opportunities include 
careers in research and development of new materials, new processes for producing them, failure analysis, product design and reliability, and technical 

165 



management at all levels of business. The importance and growth potential of the materials science and engineering discipline is reflected by a recent U.S. 
Department of Labor study which predicts that over the next decade the demand for materials engineers and scienstists will exceed that of any other 
engineering discipline. 

CURRICULA 

The materials scientist and engineer must understand the wide range of phenomena that occur in all classes of materials; metals, ceramics, polymers, 
composites, and electronic materials. The undergraduate curriculum is designed to provide balance by addressing the scientific and engineering principles 
applicable to all classes of materials as well as the particular engineering and design concepts unique to each class of material. Further emphasis in a specific 
area is provided by choosing one technical elective dealing with processing (metallic or ceramic materials) and one technical elective dealing with specific 
applications (composite materials or elecUonic materials). The basic science elective allows students to gain ore fijndamental knowledge in either solid state 
theory, organic, or physical chemistry. The required senior design sequence (MAT 423-424) serve as capstone courses and provides a strong preparation for 
dealing with real industrial situations. MAT 423 covers open-ended classroom exposures and participatory involvement in group dynamics and proposal 
preparation. MAT 424 provides direct involvement with an industrial sponsor working on real problems submitted by industry. The remaining required 
courses are distributed among mathematics, physical sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. 

The materials science and engineering program, which is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET), leads to the degree Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and Engineering. A fifth year professional program is 
available for the advanced study and further specialization. Graduate degrees are also offered (consult the Graduate Catalog). 

CURRICULUM IN MATERL4LS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 General Chemistry l' 

CH 121 General Chemistry I Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Any 100-level PE course in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CH 201 Prin. of Chemistry 

1 CH 202 Prin. of Chemistry Lab or 

CSC 110 Intro, to Comp. -PASCAL or 

1 CSC 112 Intro, to Comp. -FORTRAN or 

3 CSC 114 Intro, to Comp. -C-H- 

4 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

3 MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II' 

I PY 205 Physics for Sci. Engrs. I' 
16 



Credits 
3 
I 

(3) 
(3) 
(3) 
3 
4 
4 
14-15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CSC 110/1 12/114 Intro. Computing or 

CH 107 Prin. of Chemistry 

CH 127 Prin. of Chemistry Lab 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

MAT 201 SUnct. & Prop. Engr. Materials^ 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
4 
3 
4 
3 
17-18 



Spring Semester 

MA 341 Appl. Diff. Equations 

MAT 210 Exp. in Materials Engr. 

MAT 225 Chem. of Polymeric Materials 

MAT 301 Equil. & Rate Processes 

Basic Science Elective* 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3-4 

1 
14-15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MAT 310 Comp. Usage in Materials 

MAT 324 Polymer Char. Lab 

MAT 330 Crystal Ch. & Phase Equil. 

MAT 350 Mechanics Prop. Of Materials I 

MAT 425 Intro, to Polym. Materials 

Advanced Writing Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

2 MAT 32 1 Phase Trans. & DifRis. 

1 MAT 331 Electronic Prop, of Materials 

3 MAT 333 Electronic Prop. Lab 
3 MAT 434 Ceramic Engr. Lab 

3 MAT 435 Physical Ceramics 

3 MAT 450 Mechanics Prop, of Materials II 

15 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MAT 423 Intro, to Materials Engr. Design 

MAT 430 Physical Metallurgy Lab 

MAT 431 Physical Metallurgy I 

1st Materials Technical Elective' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ECE 33 1 Principle Elect. Engr. I 

1 MAT 424 Sr. Design Project 

3 MAT 491 Materials Engr. Seminar' 

3 2nd Materials Tech. Elective* 

3 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 

3 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective' 
16 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 126' 



♦Note: All students must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at the FL_102 level for graduation. 

All students in Material Science and Engineering must take both CH 107 and, either CSC 1 10 or CSC 1 12 or CSC 114. 

'a "C" or better must be earned in these courses. This is a graduation requirement and they must be satisfied in order for an engineering student to be eligible 

to enroll in a 200 or higher level course in the College of Engineering. 

166 



^A "C" or better must be earned in these courses. This is a departmental graduation requirement. 

'Humanities and Social Sciences courses to be selected tiom appropriate list approved by the College of Engineering . 

'CH220, CH437, orPY407. 

'Either ENG 331 orENG333. 

'Fall: MAT 440, MAT 445, or MAT 475. Spring: MAT 460 or MAT 556. 

'mat 491 Seminar may be taken either semester of senior year. 

'Credits for the first two PE courses do not count towards the minimum credits required for graduation. 

MINOR IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

The Minor in Materials Science and Engineering is designed to provide undergraduate engineering students and other science majors in curricula other 
than Materials Science and Engineering with the fundamentals of modem materials science and engineering. The Minor in Materials Science and 
Engineering offers a concentration in basic principles and a choice of specific areas of interest including ceramic, polymeric, metallic, or electronic 
materials This minor requires 17-19 hours of concentration including MAT 201 and MAT 210. The GPA for Minor courses must be a least 2.0. Further 
information regarding a Minor in Materials Science and Engineering is available from the Director Undergraduate Programs. 

MAT 201 (3) Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials 

MAT 210 (2) Experiments in Materials Engineering 

MAT 330 (3) Crystal Chemistry and Phase Equilibria 

MAT 321 (3) Phase Transformations and Diffusion 

MAT**' (6-8) Approved Electives** 

Polymeric Materials** Ceramic Materials** Metallic Materials** Electronic Materials** 

MAT 225 (2)* MAT 435 (3) MAT 43 1(3) MAT 33 1(3) 

MAT 425 (3) MAT 445 (3) MAT 440 (3) MAT 460 (3) 
MAT 475 (3) 

•ChE and other majors who have taken Organic Chemistry do not have to take this course. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING www mae ncsu edu/ 

Broughton Hall, Room 321 1 
Phone: (919)515-2365 

F. R. DeJamette, Head and Director of Aerospace Engineering Program 
F.Y. Sorrell, Director of Mechanical Engineering Program 
J. C. Mulligan, Director of Graduate Programs 
A. S. Boyers, Undergraduate Administrator 
M. L. Gonzalez, Coordinator of Advising 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: EM. Afify, MA. Boles. R.R. Johnson/1/umn/ Distinguished Graduate Professors: F.R. DeJamette, H.A. 
Hassan; R. J Reynolds Industries Professor: C.F. ZoTOV/sk\, Professors: J. A. Bailey, T.A. Dow, R.F. Keltic, C. Kleinstreuer, G.K. Lee, C.J. Maday, D.S. 
McRae, J C. Mulligan, R.T. Nagel, L.H. Royster, L.M. Silverberg, F.Y. Sorrell, J.S. Strenkowski, G.D. VJ albetg frofessor and Senior Extension Specialist: 
H.M. Eckeriin; Visiting Professor and Senior Extension Specialist: MM. Fikry; Adjunct Professors: J. P. Archie, Jr.. A.E. Bayoumi, D.P. Dewitt J. N. 
Juang, D.E. Klen, MY. Marov, E.R. McOure, Professors Emeriti: R.A, Burton, M.H. Clayton, J.A. Edwards, B.H. Garcia, Jr., W.C. Griffith, F.J. Hale, 
F.D. Hart T.H. Hodgson, E.G. Humphries, M.N. Ozisik, F.O. Smetana, J.K. V/h\t{\e\&,Associale Professors: N. Chokani, J.W. David, J.W. Eischen, R.D. 
Gould, C.E. Hall, Jr., J. Kasichainula, EC. Klang, J.W. Leach, PL Ro, A.J. Shih, E.G. Yuan, MA. Zikryjdjunct Associate Professors: J.G. Cleland, P.B. 
Corson, LP. Franzoni, J. H. Hebrank, K.R. Iyer, D.W. Lee, R.M. Potler. Assistant Professors: JR. Edwards, Jr., A.V. Kuznetsov, KM. Lyons, W.L. 
Roberts IV; Adjunct Assistant Professors DP. Colvin, J.A. Cooke, B. Driehuys, K.J. Falter, A.O. Hobbs, S.D. Holland. M. M. Nazemi, MA. Norris, M.T. 
Odman, D.J. Rossetti, S.E. Southward, MR. Spano, R.J. Stanley; Visiting Assistant Professors: B. LaMattina, CM. Tran; Lecturers: GO. Batton, AS. 
Boyers. ML. Gonzalez, R.J. Vess; Adjunct Lecturer: D. H. Youden; Lecturer Emeritus: R.J. Leuba; Adjunct Instructors: J.G. Hart, H.G. Hoomani; 
Interinslitutional Faculty: M.J. Ruiz, G.A. Truskey, KM. Whatley;facu/fv with Associal Status: M.K. Ramasubramanian (Associate Professor. Wood and 
Paper Science), J.S. Stewart (Research Associate Professor, Wood and Paper Science). 

Aerospace engineering has grown out of the challenge to design, construct, and operate vehicles ranging from helicopter and VSTOL to aircraft, rockets, 
and spacecraft Each vehicle is a complex system involving aerodynamics, propulsion, materials, stmctures, and controls. Their design is difficult because 
they must be ligh^veight and also operate reliably and efficiently in the harsh environment encountered in space and planetary atmosphere as well as earth's 
atmosphere. Student projects related to space transportation and exploration are performed at the Mars Mission Research Center on the Centennial Campus. 

Mechanical engineering involves practical application of mechanics and thermal sciences to research, design, development, testing, and manufacturing of a 
wide variety of products. The diverse areas to which mechanical engineers contribute include transportation, power generation and energy conversion, 
environmental control and pollution abatement, noise control, and biomechanics Recent developments have increased interest in areas such as robotics, 
mechatronics, precision engineering, automated manufacturing systems, combustion, and propulsion. Student projects include min-Baja and Formula Cars 
and walking machines. 

FACILITIES 

Aerospace: Both computational and experimental laboratories are heavily involved in the program. Computational facilities include PC's, workstations, and 
access to supercomputers Laboratories include subsonic and supersonic wind tunnels, propulsion systems, structures and controls labs. Senior design 
involves analysis, design, construction and flight testing of remotely piloted vehicles (RPV) or flight readiness checkout of a spacecraft mockup. An RPV 
flight facility with a paved runway is located in Burner, NC and spacecraft are constructed at the Mars Mission Research Center on the Centennial Campus. 
Mechanical: The mechanical engineering program is comprehensive in that it consists of both analytical/numerical and experimental activities and 
laboratories. Computational facilities consist of three computer laboratories, using both UNIX and Windows NT platforms. Computational software 
available includes mathematical and solution algorithms, as well as modem design and analysis tools. The experimental laboratories include measurements 
and data analysis, performance evaluation of thermal systems and power plants, and testing and analysis of mechanical components The senior design 
laboratory if jointly supported by the department and industry. This is a unique laboratory facility, which is the involvement of students in solving actual 
industrial problems by designing, building, and testing prototype machines. The laboratory facilities are supported by a machine shop and an electronics 

167 



facility. Also housed in the mechanical engineering program is the Applied Energy Research Laboratory (AERL), the Precision engineering Laboratory 
(PEC) and the Industrial Assessment Center (lAC). 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Aerospace: Aerospace engineering graduates are employed by governmental laboratories like NASA, Navy and Air Force, aerospace industries, or go to 

graduate school. Careers are available in private, commercial, and military aircraft and spacecraft industries. However, they are qualified for a wide variety 

of jobs and are often sought by other industries. 

Mechanical: Because of the wide range of applications and needs, mechanical engineering is one of the broadest engineering disciplines, and thus offers a 

wide range of employment opportunities. The program provides students with the knowledge and experience that equips them to enter a wide range of 

fiinctional areas, including design, development, manufacturing, plant operation, testing and experimentation, consulting, sales and service. Employment 

may readily be found in industry, government and service organizations. Students are also well prepared to enter graduate school to pursue advanced 

degrees in engineering, science or business, as well as professional degree programs wuch as medicine, accounting and law. 

CURRICULA 

Because of the close relationship between mechanical and aerospace engineering, both curricula are administered by one department. They are nearly the 
same for the freshman and sophomore years but quite different in the junior and senior years. Each program is designed to provide the student with an 
understanding of both the science on which the discipline if founded and the applied science and technology which characterizes its specific character. In 
addition the programs provide students with an opportunity to develop the skills for applying their acquired knowledge. The aerospace engineering and the 
mechanical engineering programs, which are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET), lead to the degrees Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, respectively. 
Graduate degrees are also offered (consult the Graduate Catalog). 

CURRICULUM IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Aerospace Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 

CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

E lOOIntro. toCOE 

E 115 Comp.A Rhetoric 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanites/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 


I 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry A Quantitative Science 

ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

PY 205 General Physics 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CSC 1 12 Intro, to Comp. - FORTRAN 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

MAE 206 Engr. Statics 

PY 208 General Physics II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 GC 2 1 1 Intro. Eng. Graphics MAE 

4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

3 MAE 208 Engr. Dynamics 

4 MAE 261 Aero. Vehicle Perf. 
3 MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 

17 MAT 201 Struc. Prop, of Engr. Materials 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 33 1 Comm. Engr. & Tech. 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 

MAE 355 Aerodynamics I 

MAE 357 Expt. Aero. I 

MAE 371 Aero. Struc. I 

MAE 461 Dynamics & Controls 

MAE 469 Controls Lab 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ECE 33 1 Principle Elect. Engr. 

3 MAE 356 Aerodynamics II 

3 MAE 358 Expt. Aero. II 

I MAE 462 Fli. Veh. Sta. & Control 

3 MAE 472 Aero. Vehicle Struc. II 

3 MAE 473 Aero. Vehicle Struc. II Lab 

1 Humanties/Soc.Sci. Elective 
17 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
1 
3 
17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MAE 455 Boundary Layer Theory 

MAE 475 Propulsion 

MAE 466 Expt. Aero. Ill 

MAE 478 Aero. Vehicle Design I 

Departmental Elective 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 

3 

3 

1 

2 

3 

3 

IS 



Spring Semester 

MAE 479 Aero. Vehicle Design II 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Humantiies/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

3 

12 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 127* 



•Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 

168 



CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Degree earned: B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 

CH 102 General Chemistry I Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E llSComp. & Rhetoric 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Fall Semester 

GC 101 Engr. Graphics 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

MAE 206 Engr. Statics 

PY 208 General Physics II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credits 
3 
1 

1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CSC 112 Intro, to Comp - FORTRAN 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

PY 205 General Physics 

Physical Education Elective 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
4 
3 
17 



Spring Semester 

MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

MAE 208 Engr. Dynamics 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 

MAT 200 Mech. Prop. Engr. Materials 

Humanites/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
IS 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Fall Semester 

ENG 33 1 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 

MAE 305 ME Lab 1 

MAE 3 1 5 Dynamics of Machines 

MAE 316 Strength fo Mechanics Comp. 

ST 370 Prob. & Stat, for Engrs. 



Fall Semester 

IE 31 1 Engr. Econ. Analysis 

MAE 405 ME Lab III 

MAE 410 conv. Heat Trans. & Fl Flow 

MAE 415 Mechanics Engr. Analysis 

MAE 435 Principle of Auto Control 

Humanitie/Soc.Sci. Elective 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

3 ECE 33 1 Principle of Elect. Engr. I 

3 MAE 302 Engr. Thermodynamics II 

1 MAE 306 ME Lab II^-D 

3 MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics 

3 MAE 3 1 Heat Transfer (Cond. & Rad.) 

3 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

16 

SENIOR YEAR 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 
MAE 412 Energy Systems 
MAE 416 ME Design 
Department Elective 
Humanties/Soc.Sci. Elective 
Humanties/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 127* 
•Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 



DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING www ne ncsu.edu/ 

Burlington Engineering Laboratories, Room 1 1 10 
Phone: (919)515-2301 

D. J. Dudziak. Head 

M. A. Bourham, Coordinator of Advising 

K. Verghese, Director of Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: K. Verghese;^/umn; Distinguished Undergraduate Professor.R.P. Gardner; Professors: MA. Bourham, 
D.J. Dudziak. J.G. Gilligan, K.L. Murty, P.J. Turinsky; Professors Emeriti: T.S. Elleman, R.L. Murray, R.F. Saxe, E. Stam; Adjunct Professors: R.A. 
Gerwin. D.L. Morrison. M.S. Wechsler; Associate Professor and Director of the Nuclear Reactor Program: C.W. MiyoAssociate Professors: J.M. Doster, 
R.M. Mayo; Adjunct Associate Professors: Y. Azmy, A.M. Hassanein, T.H. PrettyrndSwAssistanl Professors: O.E. Hankins, M.-S. Yim; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: K.R. Eamshaw. D.J. Kropaczek, DA. Petti; Lecturer and Health Physicist: G.D. Wicks; Lecturer and Associate Director of Nuclear Reactor 
Program: P.B. Perez; Nuclear Services Manager: J.N. Weaver. 

Nuclear engineering is concerned with the engineering aspects of the control, release and utilization of nuclear energy from both fission and fusion. Nuclear 
reactors serve many functions-they serve as heat sources for electric power plants, are the basis of radioactive isotopes for a variety of peaceful applications. 
Nuclear methods are applied in medical diagnosis and treatment, scientific research, and the search for new resources. The nuclear engineering program 
educates individuals in scientific and engineering principles essential for effective and productive contributions in industrial, university and government 
service. 



169 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Nuclear power reactor construction continues with over one hundred reactors operating in the nation, increasing our reliance upon nuclear energy as a 
substitute for energy from fossil fuels. Development of breeder and fusion reactors offers the potential of vast new energy sources. Industrial and medica] 
applications of radiation continue to increase in divers industries. A demand for nuclear engineers exists within the electric power industry, national 
laboratories. Naval reactors, and other industries. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Several special scholarships exist for NC State nuclear engineering students, including the Bechtel, Carolina Power and Light, Duke Power, Ebasco, Eastern 
Carolinas ANS, Piedmont ANS, Institute for Nuclear Power Operations, and American Nuclear Society scholarships. A special department fund supports 
scholarships for incoming freshmen and exceptional upperclassmen. NC State nuclear engineering students have received special recognition awards at the 
Undergraduate Research Symposium and have gained national recognition by several times receiving the Student Design Award of the American Nuclear 
Society. NC State nuclear engineering students are also frequent recipients of nationally awarded fellowships. 

FACILITIES 

Facilities for nuclear education include a nuclear research reactor (PULSTAT), which can be operated at a steady state power of I MW; the Scaled 
Pressurized Water Reactor facility (SPWR), an operating 1/9 scale model of a nuclear power plant; radiation detectors and multi-channel analyzers; nuclear 
materials laboratory; thermal hydraulic laboratory; prompt gamma facility; neutron radiography unit; numerous computer facilities including graphic 
terminals, numerous departmental computer workstations, sever College of Engineering EOS engineering workstations, and microcomputers; plasma 
diagnostics laboratory; neutron activation analysis laboratory; high- and low-level radiochemistry laboratories; simulation laboratory; and plasma science 
laboratory. 

CURRICULUM 

Nuclear engineers work in nuclear systems research, design, development, testing, operation, environmental protection, and marketing. The Bachelor of 
Science program prepares graduates for positions in industry, national laboratories, or for graduate study (consult the Graduate Catalog). The curriculum 
incorporates basic sciences and engineering, with emphasis on mathematics and physics, followed by course work in nuclear science and technology. Design 
concepts are introduced in numerous nuclear engineering courses throughout the curriculum to provide an integrated educational experience, capstoned by 
the senior nuclear reactors and radiation systems. ''Attention is also given to the efficient utilization of energy resources and to the environmental aspects of 
nuclear energy. Computers are widely used throughout the curriculum. 

The nuclear engineering program, which is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET), leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering. Advanced undergraduates who desire to attend graduate school at 
NC State and specialize in the areas of Fission, Fusion/Plasma, or radiological Engineering may enter a combined BS/MNE professional program during 
their senior year which will culminate at the end of their fiflh year with both the Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering and the Master of Nuclear 
Engineering degrees. 

CURRICULUM IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Nuclear Engiaeering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry-A Molecular Science 

CH 101 General Chemistry I Lab 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective* 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
I 

1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry-A Quant. Science 

CH 202 General Chemistry I! Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

PY 205 General Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
4 
15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CSC 1 12 Intro, to Comp - FORTRAN 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

NE 201 Intro, to Nuclear Engr. 

PY 208 General Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective* 



Credits 
3 
4 
2 
4 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 
CE 213 Intro, to Mechanics 
MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 
NE 202 Fund, of Nuclear Engergy 
PY 407 Intro, to Modem Physics 
Humanites/Soc.Sci. Elective* 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics 

NE 301 Fund, of Nuclear Engr. 

Spec/Writ/Foreign Lang. Elective* 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective* 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

MA 401 Appl. Diff. Equations II 

MAT 201 Struct. Prop, of Engr. Materials 

NE 302 Nuclear React. Ener. Conver. 

NE 401 React. Analysis & Des. 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
IS 



170 



Fall Semester 

NE 402 Reactor Engr. 

NE 404 Radiation Safety & Shielding 

NE 405 Reactor Systems 

NE or Tech Elective' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective* 



SENIOR YEAR 


Credits 


Spring Semester 




NE 403 Nuclear Engr. Design Project 




NE or Tech. Elective* 




Tech. Elective*Elective 




Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective* 




Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective* 


16 





Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 125* 

*Note: All students who graduate from this curriculum must demonstrate competency in a foreign language at the 102 level. 



TEXTILE ENGINEERING PROGRAM www tx ncsu edu/ 

Textile Building Centennial Campus. Room 3250 
Phone: (919)515-6638 

K. R. Beck, Head. Department of Textile Engineering. Chemistry, and Science 
T. G. Clapp . Associate Head 
J. P. Rust, Program Director 

(For a list of faculty, see College of Textiles, Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science) 

The textile and related industries represent a major part of the manufacturing segment of the American economy with the industry mainly concentrated in the 
Southeast The textile industry of North Carolina comprises approximately one-fourth of the United States textile industry Textile and related industries in 
North Carolina represent $100 million of payroll per week. Nationally, this number jumps to $550 million per week. 

The textile industry is rapidly changing to become a capital intensive, high-technology industry. Applications of computers and robotics are commonplace in 
the modem plant. Textile engineering is concerned with the application of scientific principles and engineering practice to the design and control of all 
aspects of fiber, textile and apparel processes, products and machinery. 

The Textile Engineering program, which is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET), leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Textile Engineering. 

FACILITIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

(See College of Textiles) 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Because the modem production and utilization of textile materials require people highly competent in the areas of engineering, mathematics, science and 
technology, graduates of the Program are prepared for challenging careers in the primary textile, man-made fiber, apparel and nonwoven industries. Textile 
engineers have also been very successful in the textile machinery, automotive, biomedical, and aerospace industries and in a wide range of other service 
companies. Opportunities abound in plant engineering, quality engineering, production control, process engineering, and product development. 

CURRICULUM 

The Textile Engineering Program guides students to investigate how scientific principles and engineering practices can be applied to the diverse 
requirements of textile materials, processes, structures, and machinery. The program combines study of physical, mathematical, and social sciences with 
engineering analysis and design techniques as related to textile systems. Students study the interaction of fibers and fabrics with machinery and consider 
such issues as quality, safety, process control and project management. Completion of a B.S. in Textile Engineering provides the individual with a broad 
engineering background suited to addressing problems and needs in industry. Since training in textile engineering involves two distinct technical fields - 
textiles and engineering - the curriculum is a joint responsibility of the two Colleges. 



CURRICULUM IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING 

Degree earned: B.S. in Textile Engineering 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science' 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab' 

E 100 Intro, to COE 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus' 1 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 

Any 100-level PE in Fimess & Wellness 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credits 
3 
1 

I 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CSC 114 Intro, to Comp. - C++' 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus 11' 

PY 205 General Physics for Engr. & Sci. I' 

Physical Education 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
1 
15 



171 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MA 242 Analytic Geotn. & Calculus III 

MAE 206 Engr. Statics' 

PY 208 General Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

TC 203 Intro, to Polymer Ch. 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 ECE 2 1 1 Electric Circuits I 

3 ECE 2 1 3 Electric Circuits I Lab 

4 MA 341 Appl. Diff. Equations 
3 MAE 208 Engr. Dynamics' 

14 TE 201 Polymer & Fib. Sc. & Engr. 
Humanites/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MAE 301 Engr Thermodynamics I 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics I 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 

TE 301 Textile Mfg. Proc. I 

TE 305 Textile Instr. & Controls 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 
ST 370 Prob. & Stat for Engr. 
TC 301 Tech. of Dyeing & Finish 
TC 302 Textile Mfg. Proc. II 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3 
17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

TE 303 Textile Chem. Proc. 
TE 401 Textile Engr. Design I 
TE 403 Mechanics of Fiber Struct. 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 
TE 402 Textile Engr. Design II 
TE 404 Textile Engr. Quality Impr. 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 
Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective^ 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
14 



Total Hours Required for Graduation: 124 



*Note: Foreign language proficiency at the FL-102 level is required. 

'Must be completed with grade of C or better. 

^To be taken according to COE requirements. 

'Students double majoring with MAE must substitute CSC 1 12 for CSC 114. 

■"Other graduation requirements include (a)2.0 overall GPA, or higher, on all course attempted at NCSU and (b) 2.0 GPA in major. 



INDIVIDUALIZED DEGREE PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING 

Page Hall, Room 120 
Phone: (919)515-3693 

The B.S. in Engineering degree offers an individualized academic program for those exceptional students who have academic and career goals that cannot be 
accommodated by the other engineering degree programs. Before being admitted into the program, students must complete the freshmen year, have at least a 
2.500 grade point average, have completed the requirements for admission into an engineering degree program and have a plan of study approved by the 
student's advisory committee and the Dean of Engineering. For information about the program, contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs at 919-515- 
2315. 

CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING 
Degree Earned: B.S. in Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to Engineering 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Calculus I 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective* 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
1 

1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab or 

CSC Ixx Intro, to Computing Elective^ 

ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr.& Sc I 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 

(3) 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16(15) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

MA 242 Calculus III 

PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. II 

Approved Elective-' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective* 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations 

4 Approved Elective-' 

3 Advised Elective^ 

3 Engineering Concentration Elective' 

14 Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective* 

172 



Credits 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Advised Statistics Elective* 
Engineering Concentration Elective-' 
Advanced Writing or Speech Elective-' 
Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective-' 



Credits 
3 
6 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

Approved Elective-' 

Approved Elective-' 

Engineering Concentration Elective-' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective* 



Fall Semester 

Advised Elective* 

Engineering Concentration Elective' 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective-' 



SENIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

6 Approved Elective (Senior Design)-' 

6 Advised Elective* 

3 Engineering Concentration Elective' 

15 Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective* 



Credits 



Minimum Credit Hours Required for Graduation: 120* 

Humanities and Social Science Electives — to be selected from the COE Guidelines and List of Approved GER courses 

CSC Elective selected from CSC 1 14 - C-h-, or CSC 1 12 - FORTRAN 

Approved Elective - one elective must be senior design oriented - see 

Advised Elective - one advised elective must be and advised statistics elective selected from ST 361 or ST 370 

Engineering Concentration Elective 

Advanced Writing/Speech Elective - to be selected from ENG 331, ENG 333, or COM 301 

Approved Elective (Senior Design) - one approved elective must have a significant senior level design component 

MECHATRONICS CONCENTRATION IN ENGINEERING 

Degree offered: B.S. in Engineering 

This degree offers students a multi-disciplinary education in design and product development processes. The curriculum integrates the classical fields of 
mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science and engineering, and information technology to establish basic principles for a 
contemporary engineering design methodology. In this methodology, engineering products and processes have moving parts that require manipulation and 
control of dynamic constructions to a required high degree of accuracy. Also, the design process requires enabling technologies such as sensors, actuators, 
software, optics, communications, electronics, structural mechanics and dynamics, and control engineering. A V.ey factor for the design process involves 
integrating modem microelectronics and information technologies into mechanical and electromechanical systems. The Mechatronics concentration for the 
curriculum supports the "synergistic integration of precision mechanical engineering, electronics control, and systems thinking into the design of intelligent 
products and processes." 

CURRICtLUM IN ENGINEERING, Mechatronics Concentration 
Degree Earned: B.S. in Engineering 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 100 Intro, to Engineering 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environ. 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 

MA 141 Calculus 1 



Credits Spring Semester 

CSC 1 14 Intro, to Computing (C++) 

E 123 Product and Processing Engineering 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. and Sci. I 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness and Wellness 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ECE 212 Fund, of Logic Design 

ECE 214 Fund, of Logic Design 

MA 242 Calculus 111 

MAE 206 Engineering Statics 

PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. II 

Physical Education Elective 



Spring Semester 

CSC 210 Concepts of Programming Language 

ECE 331 Prin. of Electrical Engineering I 

ECE 339 Prin. of Electrical Engineering Lab 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective 

MA 341 Applied Differential Equations 

MAE 208 Engineering Dynamics 



Credits 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ECE 218 Computing Organiz. & Micropr. 

ECE 314 Electronic Circuits 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Elective 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 



Spring Semester 

ECE 342 Design of Complex Digital Systems 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

MAE 302 Engineering Thermodynamics II 

MAE 315 Dynamics of Machines 

ST 361 Intro, to Statistics for Engr. 



Credits 



173 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ECE 444 Computer Control of Robots 3 ECE 480 Sr. Design Project in Elect. Engr. 3 

ECE 460 Digital Systems Interfacing 3 MAE 3 1 6 Strength of Mechanical Comp. 3 

MAE 3 10 Conduction and Radiation Heat Tmsfr 3 MAE 435 Prin. of Automatic Control 3 

Humanities/Soc.Sci Electives 6 Humanities/Soc.Sci Electives 6 

15 15 



Minimum Credit Hours Required for Graduation: 124 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 



The College of Engineering offers professional curricula leading to the degrees of Aerospace Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Industrial 
Engineer, Materials Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, or Nuclear Engineer. This program is designed for engineering students holding baccalaureate degrees 
who find that an additional year of education is desirable, for practicing engineers who desire to take a year of professional work to update their training, and 
for students holding physical sciences or mathematics degrees who seek a professional level of education in engineering. The program is intended to be 
sufficiently flexible to meet a wide variety of student needs, and to emphasize professional course work. The curriculum consists of a minimum of 30 hours 
of credit at the 400 level or above, including at least 1 5 hours of credit at the 500 level or above. 

Applicants who hold the bachelor's degree in engineering, physical sciences, or mathematics may be admitted to the professional program of the College 
of Engineering upon application and presentation of official credentials. For unconditional admission, these credentials must show a minimum grade point 
average of 2.5 overall. Admission on a provisional basis may be granted to applicants who do not meet the formal requirements. In the case of insufficient 
preparation, prerequisite courses will be prescribed in addition to the normal fifth-year requirements. 

Completion of the professional degree program does not qualify the recipient to sit for the Fundamentals of Engineering examination. 

The following requirements of the College of Engineering will be observed: 

1. Professional degree students are admitted through the Undergraduate Admissions Office as fifth-year professional degree (PR) students. They are subject 
to rules and regulations as established and administered by the Dean of the College of Engineering. 

2. Application forms for admission to the professional degree program should be completed and submitted to the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs at 
least 60 days in advance of the semester in which admission is sought. Acceptance of a student for the professional program is based on the recommendation 
of his department and the approval of the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. At the time of acceptance, NC State students may transfer a limited number 
of excess credits to their professional program. 

3. A limited amount of credit to be applied toward the requirements for the professional degree may be transferred to NC State from recognized institutions 
offering advanced work in engineering and related fields. Such a transfer of credit must be approved by the department in which the students do their major 
work and by the Dean of the College of Engineering. 

4. A graduate in one field of engineering may choose to work for a professional degree in another field provided he or she has the permission of the 
department. The student will be expected to take necessary prerequisite courses in addition to those required for the professional degree program. 

5. Each fifth-year student will be assigned to an advisor in the sponsoring department. The function of the advisor is to assist the students in preparing a 
program of study and to counsel them with regard to academic work. Prior to the midterm of the first semester, the students and their advisors should agree 
on a program of study for the professional degree. Program of Study for Professional Degree forms will be prepared and submitted to the office of the 
Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs as will as to the department. Upon approval of the Office of the Dean, this becomes the student's degree program. 

6. Grades for each completed course are reported to the Dean of the College of Engineering and to the Office of Registration. A minimum grade of "C" must 
be made in each course to obtain credit. A quality point average of 2.5 in all course work must be maintained to satisfy requirements for a professional 
degree. 

7. All courses taken by the student after admission to the professional program will count toward the overall grade point average even though an individual 
course may not be a part of the degree program. 

8. A student who falls below 2.5 average will be placed on probation and given one semester to raise the overall average up to a 2.5. If the student has been 
admitted on a provisional basis, he or she must make a 2.5 average the first semester in order to continue. 

9. Work completed more than six years prior to the date on which the professional degree is to be granted may not be used as credit toward the professional 
degree, unless approved by the head of the department concerned and the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. 

10. A professional degree student who has been admitted to the Graduate School may , with the approval of a Master's Degree committee and the Graduate 
School, transfer nine hours of credit for courses in which a grade of B or higher was received. 

1 1. A student may transfer only once, that is, from the Professional Degree Program to the Graduate School or from the Graduate School to the Professional 
Degree Program. Therefore, a student is not permitted to return to either program after having transferred from that degree program. 

12. It is intended that professional degree students will complete a substantial portion of credit hours toward the degree while in residence on the NC State 
campus. 



174 



The mission of the College of Forest Resources is to improve the use and stewardship of renewable natural resources. We seek to strengthen natural 
resource management, enhance environmental quality, increase productivity of forest enterprises, expand recreation and tourism opportunities and encourage 
sound regional economic development. To these ends, we provide superior professional education, discover new knowledge, and disseminate credible and 
timely information. 

The success of our students is our top priority and is accomplished through an unwavering commitment to excellence from all individuals involved in the 
educational enterprise. The College of Forest Resources is a place where the physical, biological and social sciences intersect. The interaction of 
disciplines, all of which are dependent upon the natural resource base, makes the College of Forest Resources a dynamic, diverse, and exciting place to study 
and to work. Our goal is to provide educational programs, facilities and services for a population of students, faculty and staff that reflect the diversity in 
culture of our Slate, our Country and our Worid. In our College diversity is characterized in such ways as: the geographic origin, age, gender, ethnic 
background, the career paths of our students and the professional disciplined of our faculty. Faculty, staff administrators and students come from the 
northern, southern, eastern, and western parts of the United States and from many nations including: Australia, Canada, the Czech Republic, China, Egypt, 
India, Iran and the Philippines. 

The College of Forest Resources offers students professional and technical curricula that emphasize fmding solutions to real world problems. Our College 
consists of students and professionals dedicated to the highest achievement in science-based global forest stewardship, research and development of forest 
products that raise the standard of living for all people, and recreation that enriches societies and cultures through responsible enjoyment of our natural 
resources. Although iterrelated. the three academic departments — Forestry; Parks. Recreation and Tourism Management; and Wood and Paper Science — 
draw faculty and students with very different career aspirations. The common thread is the sustainable wise use of the worid's natural resources. 

Over the last ten years enrollment has grown by seventy-seven percent, by far the largest of any of the established colleges at North Carolina State 
University. Students within the College of Forest Resources find an intellectually challenging environment and an educational community that is conducive 
to learning. With the increasing diversity and size of the College's population, our goal of raising the standard of living for all people becomes a realistic 
and inspiring goal. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The College of Forest Resources offers programs of study leading to baccalaureate and graduate degrees in the management and use of natural resources and 
also offers courses in the same arena to students in other colleges. Eight professional curricula are administered in the College through its Departments of 
Forestry; Parks. Recreation and Tourism Management; and Wood and Paper Science, and an nineth curriculum is offered through joint administration of the 
Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences Program with the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. These programs provide a broad education in the biological, 
physical, and social sciences as well as a sound cultural and professional background. Baccalaureate degrees prepare students for careers in the fields of 
fisheries and wildlife sciences; forest management; natural resources assessment and management; parks, recreation and tourism management; pulp and 
paper science and technology; watershed hydrology and wood products. 

Graduate degrees offered include Master of Science. Master of Forestry. Master of Natural Resources Administration. Master of Parks, Recreation and 
Tourism Management, Master of Wood and Paper Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy. Graduate degree programs may be tailored to a variety of 
specialized and interdisciplinary topics related to the teaching and research activities of the College. Applicants should consult the Graduate Catalog for 
additional information about these programs. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Each department in the College has a student curriculum club and/or student chapter of the appropriate national professional organization. All of these 
organizations provide opportunities for professional development, for interaction with faculty and other students, and for participation in local, regional, and 
national student and professional activities. Student representatives from each organization and curriculum serve on the College of Forest Resources 
Council. The Council provides overall coordination for student activities, allocates funds for student activities, and oversees production of the Pinetum, the 
College of Forest Resources student yearbook. 

FACILITIES .\ND LABORATORIES 

In addition to standard classrooms and teaching laboratories, the College of Forest Resources has a unique complex of indoor and field facilities that are 
utilized in the academic programs. Computer facilities include a general microcomputer lab, two labs with microcomputers and workstations for applications 
in geographic information systems and remote sensing, and network access to the university mainframe computer. Also available are several different 
analytical and biotechnology facilities, a photo interpretation lab. an extensive herbarium, and a wood sample collection. Facilities for field instruction and 
projects include 80.000 acres in forest: the Hofmann Forest on the Coastal Plain; the Hill. Schenck. Hope Valley and Goodwin Forests in the Piedmont; and 
the Slocum summer camp at the Hill Forest in Durham county Specialized laboratories unique to wood products programs are contained in the Hodges 
Wood Products Laboratory and the Reuben B Robertson Pulp and Paper Laboratory. Equipment in the Hodges Laboratory includes computer-controlled 
woodworking machinery, dry kilns, veneer lathe and numerous other items required to convert wood into products. The Robertson Laboratory is a 50,000 sq. 
ft. facility which contains laboratories and modem pulping and papermaking equipment dedicated to teaching and research activities. Examples of 
equipment are secondary fiber recycling equipment, a thermo mechanical pulping unit, paper machine, process control equipment, paper testing laboratory, 
and pulping digesters. 

FIELD INSTRUCTION AND WORK EXPERIENCE 

All curricula in the College have strong components of hands-on field and laboratory instruction and experience, and all either require or strongly 
recommend voluntary on-the-job work experience. All students (except those in natural resources) are required to complete the equivalent of one or more of 
the following summer activities: camp, internship, practicum. work experience. The forest management and fisheries and wildlife curricula both have 
required summer camps. Undergraduates enrolled in parks, recreation and tourism management complete a nine-week internship immediately following the 
completion of the junior year. All pulp and paper majors spend at least one summer working in an industrial setting designated by the College. Wood 

175 



products students attend a summer practicum following the freshman year. Students in all curricula may also participate in summer jobs and the cooperative 
education program to gain work experience. 

Local field trips are a regular part of many courses. Additional field instruction and scheduled trips to representative industries and agencies are frequently 
required as a part of regular class assignments. 

HONORS AND SCHOLARS PROGRAMS 

The College of Forest Resources participates in the University Scholars Program in which exceptional new students (freshman or transfer) are selected for 
special courses and activities that provide an expanded educational experience. 

The purpose of the College of Forest Resources' Honors Program is to offer the opportunity for advanced students with outstanding records to enhance the 
depth of study in their major field. Students with an overall GPA of 3.000 or better and a major GPA of 3.250 or better are invited to participate in the 
Honors Program. Students must have at least 40 hours of credit. Honors students develop more rigorous programs of study, frequently taking advanced 
courses in mathematics, science, or social science or graduate courses in the chosen curriculum. With the adviser's consent honors students may substitute 
preferred courses for normally required courses in order to develop strength in special interest areas. Honors students are required to undertake a program of 
independent study which can involve a research problem or special project during their junior or senior year, and they must participate in the senior honors 
seminar. 

Two honor societies in the College of Forest Resources promote and recognize academic excellence: Xi Sigma Pi (for all majors within the college) and Rho 
Phi Lambda (for recreation majors). Advanced undergraduate and graduate students with high academic achievement are invited to become members of 
these societies. High achieving forest management and natural resources students are also eligible for recognition by two agriculture honor societies. Alpha 
Zeta and Gamma Sigma Delta. All students are also eligible for recognition by the campus-wide honor societies. 

GIFFORD PINCHOT SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The Gifford Pinchot Scholars Program, a joint program with the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, follows the model established by the Jefferson, 
Franklin and Whitney Programs. Academically talented students are invited to pursue simultaneously a B.S. degree in Forest Management through the 
College of Forest Resources and a B.A. degree in a major in Humanities and Social Sciences through the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The 
Pinchot Scholars Program is limited to a small number (10 or fewer per year) of highly qualified and motivated students. Scholarship support is available to 
some participants in the Pinchot Scholars Program. 

Pinchot Scholars follow the requirements for the B.S. in Forest Management (with one exception: the physics course PY 2 1 1 is not required). For the B.A. 
degree, they follow a 30-hour major concentration in multidisciplinary studies. Included in this major are two core requirements: MDS 340 Perspectives in 
Agricultural History (3 credits) and MDS 498 Senior Thesis (3 credits). Participants also complete an additional MDS seminar (1 credit). In addition, 
Pinchot Scholars complete all the general education requirements for a B.A. degree in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. A total of 155 credit 
hours is required for the double degree which students can complete in four and a half years. 

The multidisciplinary studies major will involve placing forest management in the context of cross-cultural perspectives, global issues, and public policy. 
The exact set of courses that will constitute the major will be determined by students in consultation with their advisory group, subject to the approval of the 
Multidisciplinary Studies Committee. Each student is assigned an advisory group consisting of an academic advisor from each college, plus a mentor from 
the forest industry. Pinchot Scholars also participate in existing cooperative activities with other double-degree program scholars. For more information, 
contact the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Forest Resources, 1022-N Biltmore, Box 8001 or the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate 
Academic Affairs, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 201-M Winston, Box 8101. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The College of Forest Resources administers a large program of academic scholarships that is separate from the University Merit Awards Program. 
Academic scholarships (ranging from $1,000 to $4,050 per year) and renewable annually are awarded in several program areas to entering freshmen and 
fransfer students. The appropriate departments accept applications, and based on academic excellence and leadership award the scholarships that are 
administered through the North Carolina Forestry Foundation and the Pulp and Paper Foundation. The awards include atotal of more than 170 scholarships 
for students in the forest management; natural resources; parks, recreation and tourism management, pulp and paper science and technology; and wood 
products and technology curricula. 

COMPUTER COMPETENCY 

Extensive use of microcomputers and workstations is incorporated throughout all curricula of the College of Forest Resources. Each program begins with a 
basic course in computer competency in the freshman year, and students are expected to use the computer for increasingly complex class assignments and 
for the preparation of papers and reports. Computing resources are available for student use in the College and elsewhere on campus, but many students find 
it advantageous in terms of convenience to purchase a personal computer. Questions about such a purchase should be directed to the Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs or the appropriate departmental curriculum coordinator. 

INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

Students in the College of Forest Resources are exposed to the intemational dimensions of their programs in a variety of ways. Many faculty members 
regularly fravel abroad and a number are active in major projects in foreign countries, including an intemational cooperative research project concentrating 
on Central America and Mexico and a faculty exchange program with Sweden. With that faculty experience, the intemational aspects of many topics are 
covered in core courses, and several elective undergraduate and graduate courses focus specifically on the intemational dimensions of natural resource 
management. In addition, many intemational students enroll in the College, with as many as 21 different countries represented in recent years. 

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

Biltmore Hall, Room 2018 

Phone: (919)515-2891 

F. W. Cubbage, Head 

A. E. Hassan, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

B. A. Bergmann, Director of Graduate Programs 

Distinguished University Professor: E.B. Cowling; ^/umn; Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: C.B. Blank, R.R. Braham, R.A. Lancia;CaW ^^/wn 
Schenck Professor: H.L. Allen;£rfM')>i F. Conger Distinguished Professor: R.R. Sederoff; /•/■o/eMori H.L. Allen, R.I. Bruck, AW. Cooper, E.B. Cowling, 

176 



F.W. Cubbage, P.D. Doerr, W.S. Dvorak, EC. Franklin, D.J. Frederick, L.F. Grand, J.D. Gregory, A.E. Hassan, D.L. Holley, J.B. Jett, E.J. Jones, S. 
Khorram, R.A. Lancia, R. Lea. JR. McGraw, S.E. McKeand, C. McKinley, R.L. Noble, R.R. Sederoff, L.T. Tombaugh/'rofessors Emeriti: C.B. Davey, 
R.C. Kellison, B.J. ZobeV. Associate Professors: R.C. AM, H.V. Amerson, G.B. Blank, R.R. Braham, J.A.Collazo, L.J. Frampton, B. Goldfarb, L.G. Jervis, 
J.P. Roise, A.M. Stomp, R.J. Weir, R.W. V/hetten, Research Associate Professors: B.A. Bergmann, G.R. Hodge, B. Li, B. Liu, D.M. O'Malley, T.H. Shear; 
yisiling Research Associate Professor: F.C. Zinkhan; Assistant Professors: RE. Bardon, J.L. bettis, H.M. Cheshire, G.R. Hess, S. McNulty (USDA), D.J. 
Robinson, E.O. Sills, WD. Smith (USDA); Research Assistant Professors: S. Chang, D. Kelting, J. Siry, G. Sun; Visiting Research Assistant Professors: 
A. Johnson, E.S. Goldgeier; ^Moc/ate Members of the Faculty: P.T. Bromley, W.J. Fleming, R.A. Powell, T.R. Simons (Zoology), H.A. Devine, L. Gustke, 
R. Moore, BE. Wilson (Parks. Recreation and Tourism Management), F.B. Hain (Entomology), L.E. Hinesley (Horticultural Science), D.E. Moreland 
(USDA-Crop Science), E.A. Wheeler (Wood and Paper Science), S.T. Warren (Multidisciplinary Studies). 

The undergraduate program of the Department of Forestry prepares students for professional challenges, personal growth, and a lifetime of service as 
managers of renewable natural resources. The curricula endeavor to produce well-educated forestry and natural resources graduates who have the basic 
knowledge, skills, flexibility, and attitude needed for successful professional performance in a wide variety of career opportunities. Graduates will be 
prepared to face the challenges of competing uses of natural resources and the environment, and the pressures for increasing production of goods and 
services from natural ecosystems while maintaining their quality for future generations. 

Department of Forestry strives to enroll and graduate a high quality, culturally and racially diverse student body to enhance the diversity and richness of 
forestry and natural resources professionals. Its academic curricula are enriched by out-of-class contacts among students, faculty, and practicing 
professionals, which promote a sense of professionalism and professional community. Gaining practical experience is encouraged through participation in 
summer employment and the cooperative education program. 

The department has five Bachelor of Science programs: Forest Management, Natural Resources Ecosystem Assessment, Natural Resources-Policy and 
Administration, Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, and Environmental Sciences- Watershed Hydrology. The Forest Management curriculum provides the 
broad-based forestry education needed for direct employment into positions in a wide variety of forestry or forestry-related organizations. The Fisheries and 
Wildlife Sciences curriculum provides specializations needed by agencies and industries. The Natural Resources curricula provide more generalized, 
interdisciplinary programs in natural resources management that focus on the area indicated in the curriculum titles. The curriculum in Environmental 
Sciences Watershed Hydrology focuses on the specialized area of hydrologic science and watershed management. 

Instruction and practice in communications skills (both writing and speaking) are integrated into the required forestry (FOR) courses throughout the Forest 
Management curriculum and to a lesser extent in the forestry (FOR) and natural resources (NO) courses of the Natural Resources curriculum and in several 
of the professional courses of the Environmental Sciences Watershed Hydrology curriculum. The communications-across-the-curriculum program produces 
graduates who are highly competent and confident in the communication skills needed by successful natural resource managers and environmental sciences 
professionals. 

The use of computers is integrated into all five of the curricula in a similar fashion. Introductory instruction in the use of computers is provided in the 
freshman year, and practical assignments on the use of computers as a tool in natural resource management are integrated into the advanced courses of all 
three curricula The curriculum in Environmental Sciences Watershed Hydrology, in particular, has a very heavy emphasis on computer applications 
(including programming) throughout the general math and science courses as well as the advanced professional courses. 

Information on department programs may be obtained by contacting Ms. Kris Martin, College of Forest Resources Recruiting Coordinator, NCSU. Box 
8001, Raleigh, NC 27695-8001, phone (919) 515-5510 or Dr. Awatif E. Hassan, Assistant Head for Undergraduate Programs, Department of Forestry, 
NCSU, Box 8002, Raleigh, NC 27695-8002, phone (919) 515-7577. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Department of Forestry annually awards four types of scholarships that are available to freshmen, transfers, and advanced students: Academic, Forestry 
Summer Camp, Industrial and Work-Study. About 35 Academic Scholarships varying between $2000 and $3000 are awarded annually in April for the 
following academic year and are renewable provided that superior progress is made toward a degree. Six endowments provide these awards: John M. and 
Sally Blalock Beard. Edwin F. Conger, Hoftnann Forest, James L. Goodwin, Jonathan Wainhouse Memorial, and R.B. and Irene Jordan. 

Six scholarships are available each year to students attending Forestry Summer Camp. Four scholarships are awarded in April to students attending the next 
camp and two are awarded after camp to the students who exhibited superior academic and professional skills while at camp. Three endowments provide 
these awards: Ralph C. Bryant, Maki-Gemmer-Johnson, and Victor W. Herlevich. Three summer camp scholarships are available to Fisheries and Wildlife 
students through the Leopold Wildlife Club. 

Four Industrial Scholarships are available each year. In addition to cash awards of $2000, the Industrial Scholarships provide practical work experience with 
industrial forestry organizations. Industrial Scholarships are supported by grants from Canal Wood Corp., Chesapeake Corp., Georgia Pacific Corp., and 
Squires Timber Company. 

Approximately 15 Work-Study Scholarships are awarded each year, generally to juniors and seniors. Work-Study Scholarships, currently at $2100 each, 
carry a work requirement which is usually satisfied by assisting with operational activities on the college forests. This requirement means that recipients 
must be advanced students with some field skills. Four endowments provide these awards: Biltmore Forest, James L. Goodwin, George K. Slocum, and Dan 
K. Spears. 

Scholarship applications or questions should be directed to Dr Richard Braham, Forestry Scholarship Coordinator, phone (919) 515-7568, fax (919) 51 5- 
8149, e-mail: Braham@cfr.cfr.ncsu.edu. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION AND SUMMER WORK EXPERIENCE 

Practical work experience is an important component of the professional degree programs in the Department of Forestry. Experience may be gained through 
participation in the Cooperative Education Program or through summer work. The department has close ties with a number of employers in the field of 
forestry and natural resources and provides placement assistance for the work experience programs. The Cooperative Education Program, which requires a 
minimum 2.250 GPA after at least one year of study for participation (many employers require a higher minimum), involves alternating semesters or 
summer periods on the job with semesters on campus for classes. A total of 12 months of work experience is required. Students who successfijlly complete 
the "co-op" program are in high demand by employers. Interested students should contact the department placement officer, Mr. Larry Jervis, phone (919) 
515-7576, fax (919) 515-8149. e-mail: Jervis®cfr.cfr.ncsu.edu. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Students enrolled in one of the department's degree programs who have a strong interest in another degree topic may obtain a second baccalaureate degree in 

177 



addition to the primary one. Such dual degree programs may be designed to provide a broader base in a related technical field such as wood science and 
technology or soil science or to broaden the student's knowledge and skills in a supporting field such as business, economics, sociology, or political science. 
Joint programs require coordination of the courses required in both curricula and the additional time required to complete them depends on the similarity 
between the curricula and the use of electives in one to satisfy required courses in the other. One to several extra semesters may be required to complete two 
degrees but expanded employment opportunities are a defmite benefit. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

The Department of Forestry accepts NC State students with a minimum 2.0 GPA and students from other accredited colleges and universities with good 
academic records (minimum 2.5 GPA on a 4.0 scale preferred) as transfers into the Forest Management and Natural Resources curricula. Minimum GPAs of 
2.3 and 3.0 respectively are required to transfer into the Fisheries and Wild Life Sciences, Environmental Sciences Watershed Hydrology curriculum. 
Students at community colleges, junior colleges, or other baccalaureate institutions who plan to transfer to one of the department's degree programs should 
closely follow the desired curriculum by taking the equivalent courses available. Only equivalent courses will be credited to the appropriate degree program 
after enrolling at NC State, and the time required to complete the degree will depend on the courses remaining in the degree track Students applying for the 
Forest Management curriculum must have at least 30 credits equivalent to those in the freshman and sophomore years and must transfer here in the fall of the 
sophomore year in order to complete the courses required for summer camp. Formal articulation agreements exist with the four forestry programs at North 
Carolina community colleges and those students do not need to attend Summer Camp. Questions about transfer procedures or courses should be directed to 
Dr. A. E. Hassan, Assistant Department Head for Undergraduate Programs, phone (919) 515-7577, e-mail: Hassan@cfr.cfr.ncsu.edu. 

CURRICULUM IN FOREST MANAGEMENT 

The curriculum in Forest Management is a professional program accredited by the Society of American Foresters that has long been ranked as one of the 
best among the 50+ such programs in the country. With a rigorous math and science base, the curriculum produces graduates with a broad education in the 
natural sciences, humanities and social sciences, communications skills, computer competency, and the technical knowledge and skills needed for sound 
management of the multiple resources of natural and managed forest ecosystems. Preparatory courses in the freshman and sophomore years are followed by 
the 10-week forestry summer camp where the woods knowledge and field skills that are essential for all foresters are acquired. Core courses of the junior and 
senior years focus on forest ecosystem processes, applied economics, operational practices in forest stand management, measurement and analysis of forest 
stand components, policy issues in natural resource management and the management decision-making tools and skills needed to develop and implement 
forest management plans. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates in Forest Management are in demand by state and federal land-managing agencies, by industrial concerns growing wood as raw material, by state 
forestry and agriculture extension services, by forestry-related organizations such as nurseries and landscape management firms, and by urban natural 
resource management agencies. Some graduates, after acquiring professional forestry experience, are self-employed as consultants and as operators or 
owners of forestry-related businesses. Several recent graduates have become high school teachers, some have joined the Peace Corps, some are working in 
forestry-related sales and marketing and in financial management and others have joined environmental consulting firms. Many, of course, go on to graduate 
school to specialize in a wide variety of forestry and related programs. Employment opportunities are with the forest products industry, natural resource 
agencies, consulting frrms, and environmental organizations. 

CURRICULUM IN FOREST MANAGEMENT 
Degree earned: B.S. in Forest Management 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CFR 134 Computers in Natural Resources 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

FOR 110 Intro, to Forestry 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus' 

PE I Fitness & Wellness elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

1 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 
3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

2 MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math, with Appllc. 

3 History/Literature Elective^ 
I Physical Education Elective 

14 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 
14 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 201/202 Chemistry-A Quant. Sci. & Lab or 

CH 220 Infro to Organic Chemistry 

FOR 2 12 Dendrology 

PY211 College Physics I 

WPS(FOR) 202 Wood Anatomy & Prop. 



Spring Semester 

ARE 201 Infro. to Agric. & Res. Econ. or 

EC 205 Fund of Economics 

BO 360 Infro. to Ecology 

History/Literature Elective 

SSC 200 Soil Science 



SUMMER CAMP' 



FOR 204 Silviculture 

FOR 261 Forest Communities 

FOR 264 Forest Wildlife 

FOR 265 Fire Management 

FOR 274 Mapping & Mensuration 



178 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

FOR 303 Silvics & Forest Tree Physiology 

FOR 319 Forestry Economics 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interp. & Photogram 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 

ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 



Spring Semester 

FOR 304 Theory of Silviculture 

FOR 374 Forest Meas., Modeling & Invent. 

ENT (FOR) 402 Forest Entomology 

FOR 434 Forest Operations & Analysis 

PP(FOR) 318 Forest Pathology 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

FOR 405 Forest Mgmt. 

FOR 472 Renew. Res. Policy & Mgmt. 

FOR 490 Senior Seminar in Forestry 

Social Science Elective 

Advised Elective'' 



Credits 
4 
3 



Spring Semester 

FOR 406 Forest Invent. Analysis & Plan 

Advised Elective* 

FOR (FW) 404 Forest Wildlife Mgmt. 

Advised Technical Elective 

Phil.,Relig.,Vis/Perf. Arts Elective 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



128 



'Students with appropriate math skills are encouraged to take the math sequence MA 131-231 or MA 141-241. Credit earned in MA 107, MA 108, or MA 

1 1 1 does not apply toward the 128 minimum credit hours required for graduation. 

"2 1 credit hours of humanities/social science electives, distributed as shown below, must be selected from the university lists in the department curriculum 

handbook. 

1. History or literature - 6 credit hours in any combination of history or literature courses 

2. Philosophy, religion, or visual or performing arts - 3 credit hours 

3. Social Science (anthropology, cultural geography, economics, politics and government, psychology, or sociology) - ARE 201 plus three (3) credit 
hours of elective. 

4. Science, technology, and society (humanities and social science perspective) - 3 credit hours. 

5. Humanities/social science - 3 additional credit hours from any of the above categories or from the humanities/social 
science (additional) list 

'To be eligible for Summer Camp, the student must have passed all freshman and sophomore courses (including a minimum grade of C in ENG 1 1 1 & 1 12) 
with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00. 

*Six credit hours of Advised Electives must be selected from the following courses: FOR 401, FOR 41 1, FOR 422, FOR 423, FOR 484 and FOR 491. 

'Three credit hours of an Advised Technical Elective course to be selected from any department with the advisor's approval. 
Notes: 

1. Students enrolled in the Forest Management curriculum must follow the curriculum and make reasonable progress toward the degree. 

2. Additional graduation requirements: 

a. each student must achieve a Major Grade Point Average (MOP A) of 2. 00 or better in order to graduate in addition to other University 
requirements including a minimum grade ofC in ENG III and 112. 

b. Achieve foreign language proficiency at the FL_ 102 level. 

c. Complete at least one course that focuses on a non-English speaking culture that is selected from the university list in the department curriculum 
handbook. The selected course may also satisfy' a humanities/social sciences requirement. 

d. Complete a minimum of 4 workshops in the Leadership Development Series selected from the list in the department curriculum handbook. Two 
workshops are a required part of FOR 110 and two are a required part of FOR 406. 

FORESTRY SUMMER CAMP 

An intensive, full-time, 10-week summer camp experience, with forestry field training in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Mountain regions of North 
Carolina, is required in the Forest Management curriculum. The camp is based at the College's Hill Demonstration Forest with trips taken to other regions. 
Students take the summer camp after completion of the sophomore year and earn 10 semester credits for courses that provide a base of knowledge and skills 
for the advanced courses to come. 

MINOR IN FOREST MANANGEMENT 

The Forest Management minor is open to all undergraduate degree students at NC State who are interested in learning the basics of the structure and 
functioning of forest ecosystems and the policies and practices of forest management. The minor will be useful to students in unrelated career fields who 
wish to have a better understanding of the scientific and policy issues involved in the sound stewardship of the nation's forests. The minor will be usefiil to 
students in related career fields who may be responsible for management of natural resources or interacting with foresters. 

The minor in Forest Management requires a minimum of 18 credit hours that includes two required courses, FOR 212 Dendrology and FOR 472 Renewable 
Resource Policy and Management, and 1 1 credits of elective courses. Students who wish instruction and field experience in forestry technical skills may 
choose to attend Forestry Summer Camp. For additional information, contact Dr. Awatif E. Hassan, Assistant Department Head for Undergraduate Programs 
(phone 9 19-5 15-7577). 

CURRICULA IN NATURAL RESOURCES 

The two natural resources curricula offered by the Department of Forestry are components of the campus-wide baccalaureate degree program in Natural 
Resources The curricula are designed to produce natural resources professionals with a broad interdisciplinary background coupled with a specific focus in 
natural resources management. The Natural Resources curricula are rigorous math and science-based programs with a common core of math, science, 
communications, and humanities and social science courses that provide a broad general education. Students in all Natural Resources curricula will begin the 
program in a common introductory course, NR 100, and complete the program in a common junior course, NR 300, that focuses on natural resource 
measurements and a senior course. NR 400, that focuses on the tools and skills of natural resource management problem solving and decision making. Those 
common courses will highlight the integrated nature of a broad field and provide experience in the important professional practice of working together in 
interdisciplinary teams 

The curriculum in Natural Resources Ecosystem Assessment will produce graduates who have the knowledge and skills needed to inventory and describe the 
characteristics of natural ecosystems and evaluate the impacts of management practices. Ecosystem assessment or environmental impact assessment is an 

179 



extremely important and somewhat specialized arena in the environmental field that requires individuals who understand ecosystem structure and processes; 
who can identify, measure, inventory, and describe ecosystems; and who can apply standard evaluation and classification systems such as wildlife habitat 
evaluation procedures and the federal wetland delineation criteria. To the strong science base of the core is added a concentration that provides advanced 
courses in sampling and measurement and in vegetation, soils, hydrology, and wildlife and fisheries. Many of the 400-level courses also address techniques 
and issues of natural resource management. 

The curriculum in Natural Resources Policy and Administration will produce graduates who have the knowledge and skills to manage natural resources 
programs in a variety of settings and organizations with an emphasis on public agencies. The advanced courses of the curriculum provide a broad 
background in economics, policy, government, public administration, and natural resources management. An economics track begins with introductory 
microeconomics and culminates with environmental economics and public finance. Courses in the various levels of government and public administration 
provide in-depth knowledge of how public institutions work. Courses in forestry, wildlife and fisheries, and outdoor recreation provide background on issues 
and techniques of managing natural ecosystems for various uses. A common thread of how public policy on natural resources Is influenced and developed 
runs through many of the courses already noted and culminates in two senior courses that focus on policy. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates with the kind of knowledge and expertise provided by the Natural Resources Ecosystem Assessment curriculum are needed in a variety of public 
agencies and private organizations that are involved in environmental regulation and management. Examples are the wetlands protection programs of the US 
Environmental Protection Agency and the US Army Corps of Engineers and the various environmental regulatory programs of state and local governments. 
Private environmental consulting firms need entry-level professionals with broad skills in the field of environmental assessment. The broad natural resources 
background provided by this curriculum also provides a strong base for students who wish to go on to graduate school or environmental law or build 
additional specialties focused on specific job opportunities or career tracks. 

The curriculum in Natural Resources Policy and Administration is designed to produce administrators and managers for public agencies and private 
organizations that are involved with management, administration, policy making, preservation, or regulation of natural resources. Examples are the USDI 
National Park Service, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Geological Survey, state and local government agencies and not-for-profit 
environmental organizations. The broad background in government, economics, policy, and natural resource management also provides a strong base for 
students who wish to pursue a graduate program in the natural resources economics and policy arena. 

CURRICULUM IN NATURAL RESOURCES, ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT 
Degree earned: B.S. in Natural Resources 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CFR 134 Computers in Natural Resources 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 131 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Sci A ' 

NR 100 Intro, to Natural Resources 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness^ 



Credits 

4 
1 
3 
3 
2 



Spring Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry- A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

COM 1 10 Public Speaking or 

COM 1 12 Interpersonal Comm. 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

FOR 252 Intro, to Forest Science 

MA 231 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Sci B 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Sci. and 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab or 

CH 220 Into. Organic Chemistry 

ARE 201 Intro, to Agric. & Res. Economics or 

EC 205 Intro, to Economics I 

FOR 2 12 Dendrology 

PY2II College Physics I 



Spring Semester 

MEA 101 Geology LPhysical 

MEA 1 10 Geology I Lab 

PS 201 Intro, to American Govt, or 

PS 202 State & Local Govt. 

History/Literature Elective 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

PE 253 Orienteering 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 360 Intro, to Ecology 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpret. & Photogram 

ST 3 1 1 Intro, to Statistics 

ZO 201 General Zoology 

History/Literature Elective' 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 
4 
3 
17 



Spring Semester 

ARE(EC) 336 Intro. Res. & Environ. Econ. 
ENG 333 Comm., for Sci. & Researchers 
NR 300 Natural Res. Measurements 
ZO 460 Aquatic Natural History Lab 
FOR (FW) 404 Forest Wildlife Mgmt. 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
2 
3 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BO 495F Wetland Plants 

FOR 401 Watershed & Wetlands Hydrology 

FOR 584 Pract. of Environ. Impact Asses. 

FW(ZO) 420 Fishery Science 

Phil., Relig. Vis/Perf. Arts Elective 



Credits 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
17 



Spring Semester 

Advised Elective 

FW 485 Natural Res. Advocacy 

NR 400 Natural Res. Mgmt. 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 

Social Science Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3 
17 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



126 



180 



' Students with appropriate sl<ills are encouraged to take the math sequence MA 141-241. Credit earned in MA 107, MA 108, or MA 1 1 1 does not apply 

toward the 126 minimum credit hours required for graduation. 

^ Two semesters of physical education are required for graduation. At least one course must fulfill the "Fitness and Wellness" requirement (any PE course at 

the 100 level in fitness and wellness). Students may elect S/U grading for all PE courses. 

' 12 credit hours of H/SS electives, distributed as shown below, must be selected from the university lists in the department curriculum handbook. 

1. History or literature - 6 credit hours in any combination of history or literature courses. 

2. Philosophy, religion, or visual or performing arts - 3 credit hours. 

3. Social Science (anthropology, cultural geography, economics, politics and government, psychology, or sociology) - 3 credit hours of elective. 
Notes: 

1 . Students enrolled in the Natural Resources, Ecosystem Assessment curriculum must follow the curriculum and make reasonable progress toward the 
degree. 

2. Additional graduation requirements: 

a. Earn a minimum grade of C in ENG 1 1 1 & 1 12. 

b. Achieve foreign language proficiency at the FL_ 102 level. 

c. Complete at least one course that focuses on a non-English speaking culture that is selected from the university list in the department curriculum 
handbook. The selected course may also satisfy humanities/social sciences requirement. 

CURRICIILIIM IN NATURAL RESOURCES, POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION 
Degree earned: B.S. in Natural Resources 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CFR 134 Computers In Natural Resources 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 131 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Sci. A' 

NR 100 Intro, to Natural Resources 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

1 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 
3 COM 110 Public Speaking or 

3 COM 1 12 Interpersonal Comm. 

2 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

1 FOR 252 Intro, to Forest Science 

14 MA 231 Calculus for Life & Mgmt. Sci. B 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab OR 

CH 220 Intro Organic Chemistry OR 

ARE 201 Intro, to Agric. & Res. Economics or 

EC 205 Fundamentals of Economics 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 

MEA 110 Geology I Lab 

PY211 College Physics 



Spring Semester 

PS 201 Intro, to American Govt. 

SSC 200 Soil Science 

ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 

PE 253 Orienteering 

ZO 150 Animal Diversity 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ARE(EC) 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 

BO 360 Intro, to Ecology 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpret. & Photogram 

PRT 350 Outdoor Recreation Mgmt. 

History /Literature Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
16 



Spring Semester 

ARE(EC) 336 Intro. Res. & Environ. Econ. 
ENG 333 Comm. for Sci. & Researchers 
NR 300 Natural Res. Measurements 
PS 202 State & Local Govt. 
History/Literature Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EC 410 Public Finance 

FOR 472 Renew. Res. Policy & Mgmt. 

FW(ZO) 353 Wildlife Mgmt. or 

FW(ZO) 420 Fishery Science 

PS 312 Intro, to Public Admins. 

Philosophy, Religion, Visual/Performing Arts Elective 



Spring Semester 

ARE(EC) 436 Environ. Economics 

FW(AC) 485 Natural Res. Advocacy 

NR 400 Natural Res. Mgmt. 

PRT 451 Prin. Recr. Plan. Facil. Dev. 

Social Science Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



123 



'Students with appropriate math skills are encouraged to take the math sequence MA 141-241 . Credit earned in MA 107, MA 108, or MA 1 1 1 does not apply 

toward the 123 minimum credit hours required for graduation. 

^Two semesters of physical education are required for graduation At least one course must fulfill the "Fitness and Wellness" requirement (any PE course in 

Fitness and Wellness at the 100 level). Students may elect S/U grading for all PE courses. 

'12 credit hours of Humanities/Social Science electives, distributed as shown below, must be selected from the university lists in the department curriculum 

handbook. 

1 . History or literature - 6 credit hours in any combination of history or literature courses. 

2. Philosophy, religion, or visual or performing arts - 3 credit hours. 

3. Social Science (anthropology, cultural geography, economics, politics and government, psychology, or sociology) - 3 credit hours of elective. 

181 



Notes: 

1. Students enrolled in the Natural Resources. Policy and Administration curriculum must follow the curriculum and make reasonable progress toward the 
degree. 

2. Additional graduation requirements: 

a. Earn a minimum grade ofC in ENG III & 112. 

h. Achieve foreign language proficiency at the FL 102 level. 

c. Complete at least one course that focuses on a non-English speaking culture that is selected from the university list in the department curriculum 

handbook. The selected course may also satisfy humanities/social sciences requirements. 

CURRICULUM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

Hydrology is the science of water tliat is concerned with the origin, circulation, distribution, and properties of the waters of the earth. Watershed hydrology 
then is the application of that science to the study of the storage, movement, and quality of water in the context of the natural landscape unit the watershed, 
and the effects of man's activities on that water. The curriculum in Environmental Sciences, Watershed Hydrology will produce graduates who have the 
knowledge and skills needed to analyze the hydrologic functioning of watersheds, to plan and implement watershed management practices, and to deal with 
the ecologic, social, political, and economic aspects of water resources problems. The Environmental Sciences core provides a strong education in the basic 
physical, biological, and mathematical sciences; the humanities and social sciences; and the suncture and functions of natural ecosystems. Advanced courses 
of the concentration in Watershed Hydrology focus on hydrologic processes in watersheds; applications of hydrology in environmental management; skills 
of measurement, analysis, and communication; and computer applications. For information on entrance requirements for freshmen and transfer students, 
contact the curriculum coordinator: Dr. James D. Gregory, Department of Forestry, NCSU, Box 8008, Raleigh, NC 27695-8008, phone (919) 515-7567, fax 
(919) 515-6193, e-mail: jim_gregory@ncsu.edu. 

OPPORTIFNITIES 

The increasing stresses on water resources resulting from population growth will maintain demand for hydrologists in a variety of career positions. 
Hydrologists are needed in research, technical, environmental assessment and management positions in a variety of federal and state agencies and private 
organizations. The Environmental Sciences, Watershed Hydrology curriculum meets the criteria of the US Office of Personnel Management for the position 
of Hydrologist; therefore, graduates will be qualified to serve as hydrologists in federal agencies such as the US Geological Survey, US Forest Service, US 
Army Corps of Engineers, and the USDA Soil Conservation Service. State agencies such as the Office of Water Resources and the Division of 
Environmental Management are also excellent sources of employment. In the private sector, hydrologists are needed by environmental consulting firms and 
environmental organizations and by companies that own and manage large areas of forested, agricultural, or urbanized land. The rigorous scientific and 
quantitative background in the field of hydrology in this curriculum also provides excellent preparation for students who wish to pursue a graduate program 
in water resources. 

CURRICULUM IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, WATERSHED HYDROLOGY 
Degree earned: B.S. in Environmental Sciences 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BIO 125 General Biology 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 

MA 141 Analytic Geom & Calculus I 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 201 Chemisfry - A Quantitative Science 

3 CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

1 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 

3 E 1 1 5 Intro, to Computing Environments 

4 ES 100 Intro, to Environ. Sciences 

15 MA 24 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 

Any 100- level PE in Fitness & Wellness^ 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3 
4 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PY 205 Physicsl for Engr. & Sci. I 

CSC 1 12 Intro, to Computing - FORTRAN 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III 

MEA 130 Intro, to Weather & Climate 

MEA 135 Intro, to Weather & Climate Lab 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 ARE 201 Intro, to Agric. & Res. Economics or 

3 EC 201 Intro, to Economics I 

4 CE 2 1 4 Engineering Mechanics - Statics 
3 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations I 

1 PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

1 SSC 200 Soil Science 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CE 2 1 5 Engineering Mechanics - Dynamics 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interp. & Photogram 

BO 200 Plant Life 

ST 380 Prob. & Stat, for Phys. Sciences 

History/Literature Elective^ 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 BO 360 Intro, to Ecology 

3 BO 365 Ecology Lab 

4 CE 382 Hydraulics 

3 COM 110 Public Speaking or 

3 COM 112 Interpersonal Comm. 

16 ENG 333 Comm. for Sci. & Researchers 
NR 300 Natural Res. Measurements 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 



182 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BAE 471 Land Res. Environ Engineering 3 ARE(EC)336 Intro, to Res. & Environ. Econ. 3 

BAE 473 Into to SurfaceAVater Qual. Mod. 3 ES 400 Environ. Sciences Proj. Course' 3 

FOR 401 Watershed & Wetlands Hydrology 4 PS 320 U.S. Environmental Politics or 

MEA 565 Hydrogeology 3 PS 336 World Environmental Politics 3 

Philosophy, Religion, Visual/Performing Arts Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 

16 History/Literature Elective 3 

15 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128 

Additional graduation requirements: 

a Earn a minimum grade ofC in ENG 111 & 112. CH 101, MA 141 & 241. PY205. NO 300. BAE 471 & 473. ES 400. FOR 
401. MEA 565. 

b. Achieve foreign language proficiency at the FL_ 102 level. 

c. Complete at least one course that focuses on a non-English speaking culture that is selected from the university list in the — department curriculum 
handbook. The selected course may also satisfy humanities/social sciences or foreign language - requirements. 

'Two semesters of physical education are required for graduation. At least one course must fulfill the "Fitness and Wellness" requirement (any PE course at 

the 100-level). Students may select SAJ grading for all PE courses. 

'\2 credit hours of humanities/social science electives, distributed as shown below, must be selected from the university lists in the department curriculum 

handbook. 

a. History or literature - 6 credit hours in any combination of history or literature courses. 

b. Philosophy, religion, or visual or performing arts - 3 credit hours. 

c. Social science (anthropology, cultural geography, politics and government, psychology, or sociology) - 3 credits. 

MINIMUM ENTRANCE QUALIFICATIONS 

FRESHMEN: High School GPA of 3.5 

SAT total score of 1 100, SATM score of 600 

Al=2.7; PGE=2.5; PGM=2.8 

Math: place directly into MA 141 . Requires Math Achievement Test score. Level 11=550 or AP Calculus Test score = 2. 

TRANSFERS: NCSU: Successfully completed at least 28 credit hours with a minimum GPA of 2.75 and completed CH 201/202, 

ENG 1 12, and MA 241 with minimum grades of C. 

Other institutions: Successfully completed at least 30 credit hours with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and the equivalents of CH 201/202, ENG 

112, and MA 241 with minimum grades of C. 

CURRICULUM IN FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES 

(See listing under Department of Zoology) 

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

Biltmore Hall, Room 4008 
Phone: (919)515-3276 

PS. Rea, Head 

Professors Emeriti: T.I Hines, WE Smith, RE. Stemlof, MR. Warren; Professors: HA. Devine, P S. Rea, CD. Siderelis, J.D. Wellman; Associate 
Professors Emeriti: G.A. Hammon, L.L. Miller, C.C. Stott; Associate Professors: A. Attarian, S.L. Kirsch, L.D. Gustke, C.S. Love, BE Wilson, G.L. 
Brothers, R.L. Moore; Adjunct Associate Professor: H.K. Cordell; Assistant Professor: MA. Kanters; Adjunct Instructors: J 1 Connors, G.R Worls; 
Instructor: K. Hamilton Brown, E.K. Lindsay, A. Moore; Associate Members of the Faculty: C.S. Vick (Cooperative Extension Service). 

The department offers an Interdisciplinary program allowing students to focus on careers in park management, recreation tourism or sports. Standards 
adopted by the recreation profession make college graduation a requirement for employment. North Carolina State University has facilities, staff, 
curriculum, program and an established reputation for comprehensive professional education in the study of parks, recreation, tourism and sport 
management The program is nationally accredited 

OPPORTUNITIES 

As increased discretionary time becomes available for large segments of the American population, opportunities for growth in the leisure service professions 
have increased dramatically A recreation and park professional's goal is to influence people to use their discretionary time wisely and to improve the quality 
of their lives This goal is accomplished by providing recreation programs and facilities for people in a variety of settings 

Career opportunities include employment by park and recreation departments operated by county and municipal governments, state agencies such as state 
parks, federal government with agencies such as the National Park Service, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Forest Service; resorts and country clubs; and sport 
teams 

Other major employers include youth and family service organizations such as the YMCA, YWCA, Boys' Clubs, Boy and Girl Scouts Industries employ 
recreation directors to head employee recreation programs. Areas with perhaps the greatest growth potential for employment are tourism agencies and 
commercial recreation establishments such as resorts, private clubs, theme parks, and convention and conference centers. Sport management is also a 
growing profession with a variety of career opportunities. 

183 



CURRICULUM IN PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

The curriculum in parks, recreation and tourism management offers a broad general education background, basic professional and technical courses, and the 
opportunity to specialize in a particular field. General education courses are in natural sciences, psychology, sociology, English, mathematics, 
communication, and economics. Specialized courses are required in statistics and the use of computers. 

The curriculum is designed to prepare men and women for a variety of positions in a dynamic and challenging profession. The focus of the curriculum is on 
management rather than face-to-face leadership. The curriculum provides 42 hours of professional course work that includes recreation philosophy, 
management techniques and skills, fiscal management, supervision, facility and site planning, programming, administration, and analysis and evaJuation. A 
computer laboratory is utilized in many courses to provide the student with the best current technology available. 

In addition to the general education requirements and the core professional requirements, students can begin to attain specialized training through 
concentration courses. At the beginning of the students' junior year they choose one of the following concentrations: tourism and commercial recreation, 
park management, natural resource management, program management, or sport management. 

Academic studies on campus are supplemented by practical laboratory experiences in the Raleigh area, out-of-state field trips and study opportunities, and a 
ten-week internship with a park, recreation or tourism agency. Cooperative work-study programs are available. 

CURRICULUM IN PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 
Degree earned: B.S. in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CFR 134 Computers in Natural Resources 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 105 Math, of Finance or 

MA 1 1 1 Precalculus Algebra and Trig, or 

MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math, with Applic. or 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus 

PRT 101 Parks, Rec, and Tourism Pract.^ 

PRT 152 Intro, to Parks, Rec. & Tourism^ 

Natural Science Elective' 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Spring Semester 

Comm./Speech Elective 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading' 

Natural Science Elective' 

PRT 215 Park & Rec. Maint. Mgmt. 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 
1 
14 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EC 205 Fundamentals of Economics or 

ARE 201 Economics of Agriculture 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psychology or 

200-Level Sociology Course 

PRT 216 Managing Park and Rec. Facilities 

Advanced Writing Elective' 

Physical Education Elective 



Spring Semester 
PRT 238 Inclusive Recreation 
PRT 358 The Recreation Program 
PEH 280 Emergency Medical Care 
Phil., Relig. Vis/Perf Arts Elective 
History or Literature Elective 
Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
1 
IS 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PRT 350 Outdoor Recreation Mgmt. 

PRT 359 Leadership, Supervision and Adm. 

PSY 376 Human Growth and Dev. or 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 

Sci., and Technology & Soc. Elective" 

Statistics Elective' 

SUMMER SESSION 

PRT 475 Recreation and Park Internship 



Credits 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

PRT 380 Analysis & Eval. in PRT 

Concentration 

Natural Science (Other) Elective 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
4 
13 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

PRT 454 Park and Rec. Finance and Adm. 

PRT 476 Post Internship Seminar 

Concentration 

History or Literature Elective 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
13 



Spring Semester 

PRT 451 Facility and Site Planning 

PRT 477 PRT Mgmt. 

Concentration 

Sci., Technology & Soc. Electiv^' 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
14 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 121 



'students must receive a "C" or better grade in all English writing courses (111,112, and advanced writing elective) 
^Students must take PRT 101 and 152 concurrently 



184 



'Natural Science courses must be from two different basic sciences (biology, chemistry, earth sciences and physics); two of the three courses must have a 

laboratory. 

■"Course must be selected from the Science/Technology/Society (Science and Technology Perspective) List. 

'Course must be a 300-level statistics course. 

'Courses taken to satisfy the Science, Technology and Society requirements must include one of the following courses: FW 221, MDS 201, MDS 301, MDS 

302, MDS 303, PHI 322. 

'One of the courses taken to satisfy the Science/Technology/Society requirements must include one of the following courses: FW 221, MDS 201, MDS 301, 

MDS 302, MDS 303, PHI 322. 

* Foreign language proficiency at the 102 level is required for graduation. 

Among the courses taken to fulfill graduation requirements, at least one must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

MINOR IN PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

The academic minor in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, is offered to students interested in gaining a basic knowledge of the parks, recreation 
and tourism field and an understanding of the importance of leisure and recreation in American society. It is not intended to prepare students for a 
professional career in parks, recreation and tourism. Seven hours of required courses and nine hours of electives are necessary to complete the minor. The 
program provides a background in recreation and park management which is useful to students who will assume full-time careers that are associated with 
recreation and park services, and become involved in the park and recreation field as a volunteer, program leader or policy-making board member with such 
organizations as the Scouts, Y's, art advisory councils, and conservation organizations. 

CONCENTRATIONS 

Program Management Concentration (9 hours) (Select Three Courses) 

PRT 353, Camp Adminisfration (3) 

PRT 365, Arts Management in Recreation (3) 

PRT 366, Administration of Recreation Sports (3) 

PRT 442, Recreation and Park Interpretive Services (3) 

Natural Resource Management Concentration (10 hours) 

PRT 442, Recreation and Park Interpretive Services (3) 

FW 22 1 , Cons, of Natural Resources (3) OR FOR 472, Renewable Res. Policy and Management (3) 

BO 403, Systematic Botany (4) OR FOR 212, Dendrology (4) 

Park Management Concentration (9 hours) 

CS 200, Introduction to Turfgrass Management (4) 

HS 342, Landscape Horticulture (3) 

HS 471. Tree and Grounds Maintenance (4) 

Tourism and Commercial Recreation Concentration (9 hours) 

PRT 220, Commercial Recreation and Tourism (3) 

PRT 320, Convention and Visitor Services (3) OR PRT 420, Resort Management and Operations (3) 

ACC 210, Accounting I, Concepts of Fin. Reporting (3) OR ACC 280, Managerial Accounting (3) 

Sport Management Concentration (12 hours) 

PRT 366, Administration of Recreation Sports (3) 
PEC 478, Sport Science (3) 
PEC 479, Sport Management (3) 
BUS/PRT 406, Sports Law (3) 

DEPARTMENT OF WOOD AND PAPER SCIENCE 

Biltmore Hall, Room 2105 
Phone: (919)515-5807 

M. J. Kocurek, Head 

R. D. Gilbert, Director of Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: M.W. KeWy .Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor and Elis <5 Signe Olsson Professor: J.S. Gratz; 
Reuben B Robertson Professor: H-M Chang; Buckman Distinguished Scientist: MA. Hubbe/'rq/eMori. H-M Chang, J. Denig, J.S. Gralzl, J. A. Heitmann 
Jr., L Jahn. H. Jameel, M.W. Kelly, M.J. Kocurek, H.G. Olf E.A. Viy\tt\er, Professors Emeriti: AC. Barefoot, EL. Deal, EL. Ellwood, IS. Goldstein, 
C.A. Hart R.G. Hitchings, R.G. Pearson, R.J. Thomas; /(<^u/ic/ Professors: L.L. Edwards, T.K. Kirk, R. Szymam.Associate Professors: MA. Hubbe, B. 
Kasal, AG. Kirkman, MR, Ramasubramanian, J.S. Stewart; Adjunct Associate Professors: R.B. Phillips, HA. Stewart;/lMOC/ate Professors Emeriti: R.C. 
Allison, R.C. Gilmore, S.J. Hanover; Assistant Professors: J.F Kadia, PH. Mitchell, P.N. Peralta, R.A. Venditli; Adjunct Assistant Professor: A.G. 
Raymond Jr.; Senior Research Associate: C.L. Chen. Research Associate: R.L. Lemaster; Research Assistant: W.S. Bryan; Director of Applied Research: 
M.V Byrd; Associate Member of the Faculty: R.D. Gilbert. 

The wood-based industry of North Carolina, as well as throughout the .South, is a vital part of the nation's economy In terms of the dollar value of shipments 
of wood and paper products, the South leads all regions of the country. North Carolina manufactures more wood household furniture than any other state, 
ranks third in shipment value for all wood and paper products and second in number of employees and wages paid. Thus, many opportunities exist in North 
Carolina and other southern states for careers in the wood-based industry. 



185 



The Department of Wood and Paper Science offers two curricula leading to Bachelor of Science degrees - Pulp and Paper Science and Technology, and 
Wood Products. Both curricula prepare men and women for careers in the wood and paper and allied industries or In government agencies connected with 
wood resources. 

CURRICULA IN PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Adrianna G. Kirkman, Undergraduate Coordinator 

The Pulp and Paper Science and Technology curriculum prepares students for careers in pulp and paper, an industry that ranks as the fifth-largest 
manufacturing industry in the United States. Science, engineering, and mathematics form the basis for a multidisciplinary approach to understanding the 
fundamental manufacturing principles involved. Students study wood pulping processes, chemical and by-product recovery systems, and pulp bleaching. In 
addition, various paper-making operations such as refining, sizing, coating, and drying are studied. 

Two concentrations are available emphasizing the technological or engineering aspects of pulping and papermaking. The Technology Concentration 
provides an extensive background in the pulp and paper manufacturing processes and elective credit hours for studies in marketing, economics, management 
or other concentrations of interest to the student. Greater depth in the engineering principles underlying pulp and paper manufacturing can be obtained from 
the Chemical Engineering Concentration. Students who have completed the Chemical Engineering Concentration in pulp and paper science and technology 
can, in cooperation with the College of Engineering and with an additional semester of study, earn a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering as a 
second degree. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates of this curriculum find opportunities for challenging careers as process engineers, product development engineers, process control chemists, 
technical service engineers, quality control supervisors, and production supervisors. Design and construction engineering companies employ graduates as 
project engineers, and pulp and paper machinery companies use their education and skills for technical service and sales positions. Opportunities for 
managerial and executive positions are available to graduates as they gain experience. 

SUMMER INTERNSHIP 

All pulp and paper majors are required to work one summer in a pulp or paper mill. One hour of academic credit is granted after completion of 12 weeks of 
mill work and presentation of a satisfactory report. In addition, students are urged to work in mills the other two summers, as the work provides valuable 
practical experience. Departmental advisors assist students in locating summer work. 

REGIONAL PROGRAM 

The pulp and paper curticulum is a regional program approved by the Southern Regional Education Board as the undergraduate program to serve the 
Southeast in this field. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Approximately 95 undergraduate academic scholarships are granted annually to new and continuing students by more than 100 companies comprising the 
Pulp and Paper Foundation. 

CURRICULUM IN PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 

TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

Degree earned: B.S. in Pulp and Paper Science and Technology 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 115 Intro. to Computing Environments 

EC 205 Fundamentals of Economics 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 141 Calculus I 

WPS 101 Intro, to Wood and Paper Science 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 
3 
I 
1 
3 
3 
4 
I 
1 
17 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading' 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 

WPS 102 Intro. Pulp & Paper Technology 



Credits 
3 
I 
3 
4 
4 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Prin.' 

MA 242 Calculus III 

WPS 215 Pulping Technology' 

Physical Educaiton Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
4 
3 
1 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

WPS 216 Papermaking Technology' 

Advised Elective' 

Humanltles/Soc.Scl./Hlstory /Literature^ 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
17 



SUMMER SESSION 



WPS 211 Pulp and Paper Internship 



186 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 331 Intro. Physical Chemistry 
ST 361 Intro. to Statistics for Engr. 
WPS 3 1 Paper Properties & Additives 
Phil., Relig. Vis/Perf. Arts Elective^ 
H/SS SCIATechnology/SOC' 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech. 

3 WPS 332 Wood and Pulping Chemistry 

3 WPS 355 Pulp & Paper Unit Processes 1 

3 WPS 371 Pulping Process Analysis 

3 WPS 381 Pulp/Bleach Chemistry Lab 

16 H/SS History/Literature^ 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
2 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

WPS 410 Mo. & Sim. Pulp & Paper Process 

WPS 475 Process Control 

WPS 360 Pulp and Paper Unit Processes II 

H/SS PSY/PS/SOC/ANT^ 

Advised Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 WPS 472 Paper Process Analysis 

3 WPS 460 Environ. Issues 

3 WPS 465 Paper Products Des. 

3 WPS416ProjecMgmt. 

3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 

15 Advised Elective' 



Credits 
3 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128 

'Minimum of C grade required for graduation in PPT 

^21 credit hours of H/SS electives must be selected from the university approved lists in the department curriculum handbook 

'Contact your advisor for information on Advised Elective Courses 

•Foreign language proficiency at the FL 102 level required for graduation for all students admitted as freshman or transfer students beginning Summer and 
Fall 1994 

♦♦At least one course must be taken which focuses on a non-English speaking culture; the selected course may also satisfy humanities/social sciences or 
foreign language requirements 

CURRICULUM IN PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CONCENTRATION 

Degree earned: B.S. in Pulp and Paper Science and Technology 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Environments 

EC 205 Fundamentals of Economics 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 141 Calculus! 

WPS 101 Intro, to Wood and Paper Science 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits 

3 
1 
1 
3 
3 
4 
1 



Spring Semester 

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading 

MA 241 Calculus II 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 

WPS 102 Intro, to Pulp & Paper Technology 



Credits 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Prin.' 

MA 242 Calculus III 

WPS 215 Pulping Technology' 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
4 
3 
I 
16 



Spring Semester 
CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 
CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 
MA 341 Applic. Diff. Equations I 
PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 
WPS 216 Papermaking Technology' 



Credits 
4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
17 



SUMMER SESSION 

WPS 21 1 Pulp and Paper Internship 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CHE 31 1 Transport Processes I 

CHE315ThennodynI 

ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Technology 

WPS 310 Paper Properties & Additives 

CH Quantitative Analysis 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CHE 3 1 2 Transport Processes II 

3 Option Elective CHE 316' 

3 WPS 332 Wood & Pulping Chemistry 

3 WPS 371 Pulping Process Analysis 

4 WPS 38 1 Pulp & Bleach Chemistry Lab 
16 H/SS/Histor> /Literature^ 

H/SS/PHI/REL/ARTS' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 
3 
18 



187 



Fall Semester 

WPS 360 Pulp & Paper Unit Processes II 

WPS 410 Mod & Sim P & P Processes 

WPS 475 Process Control 

H/SS SCIATechnology/SOC^ 

H/SS History/Literature^ 



SENIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 


Credits 


3 WPS 472 Paper Process Analysis 


3 


3 WPS 460 Environ. Issues in Paper Industry 


1 


3 WPS 465 Paper Prod. Design 


2 


3 WPS 416 Project Mgmt. 


3 


3 H/SS PSY/PS/SOC/ANT' 


3 


15 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 


3 




IS 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 128 
With Option Elective: 131 

Additional Courses for CHE Degree: CHE 330, CHE 446, CHE 450, ECE 33 1 or MAT 20 1 

'Minimum of C required for graduation in PPT; additional restrictions may apply for the CHE degree 

^21 credit hours of H/SS electives must be selected from the College of Engineering List 

'To complete requirements for a second BS in CHE in nine semesters, the indicated CHE courses must be taken as "Option Elective" 

♦Foreign language proficiency at the FL 102 level required for graduation for all students admitted as freshman or transfer students beginning summer and 

fall 1994 

** At least one course must be taken which focuses on a non-English speaking culture, the selected course may also satisfy humanities/social sciences or 

foreign language requirements. 

MINOR IN PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

The Pulp and Paper Technology Minor is available to all undergraduate students enrolled in the university as degree candidates, except Pulp and Paper 
Technology majors. The minor requires 15 credit hours. Six hours of required courses provide a comprehensive overview of pulping and paper-making 
science and technology, including pulping, bleaching, chemical recovery, recycled fibers, stock preparation, papermaking, coating, printing, converting, and 
environmental aspects. Nine elective hours may be chosen from areas including paper properties, wood chemistry, unit operations, computer modeling and 
simulation of processes, project management, environmental issues, or process control. This course will provide more in-depth exposure to the basic pulping, 
bleaching and paper-making processes. 

The Pulp and Paper Technology Minor, with its focus on paper-making science and technology, is intended to be especially valuable to students majoring in 
programs leading to careers in corporate or government positions which would interface with the paper and related industries. Students interested in 
business, scientific or engineering specialties which may interface with or be employed by these industries will find the minor especially usefril. 

The office location and phone number for students and others inquiring about the PPT minor is: Department of Wood and Paper Science, 2105 Biltmore 
Hall, 919-515-5807. 

CURRICULUM IN WOOD PRODUCTS 

M. W. Kelly, Undergraduate Coordinator 

The wood products industry is of major importance to the economy of North Carolina and the Southeast. It ranks third in the state in the value of shipments, 
behind only textiles and tobacco products, and it is second to textiles in the number of employees. The managerial opportunities for graduates with a BS. in 
Wood Products are excellent. Graduates of this program have a broad education in the humanities, communication skills, social and natural sciences, as well 
as the professional training required for managerial positions in the wood products industry. The curriculum, similar to a material science program, is based 
on the natural resource wood with an emphasis on industrial manufacturing and management. Graduates' knowledge of wood as a raw material enables them 
to properly design and process a variety of wood-based products of value to society. As the availability of nonrenewable resources decreases and their costs 
Increase, the demand for wood, a renewable resource, increases. Currently, career opportunities are excellent and continued strong demand for individuals 
with a wood products education is anticipated. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The Wood Products curriculum at North Carolina State University, which is accredited by the Society of Wood Science and Technology, prepares graduates 
for production supervision, staff positions and management responsibilities in all types and sizes of wood industries. Careers also include positions with both 
large and small companies manufacturing consumer wood products such as furniture. Graduates are also in demand by chemical and equipment suppliers to 
the wood manufacturing industries of chemicals and equipment. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Approximately six undergraduate merit scholarships are granted annually to new and continuing students through the Forestry Foundation. 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

The curriculum provides a minimum of 15 credit hours for technical electives which may be used to pursue a minor in a variety of areas including business 
management, industrial engineering, graphic communications, forestry management or economics. For those undergraduates desiring exposure to more than 
one area, the technical electives may be chosen from these and other areas, depending on the individual's career goals. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Dual degree programs are available whereby students can obtain, in addition to a Bachelor of Science in wood products, a second Bachelor of Science 
degree in forestry, pulp and paper science, business management or in other areas. Credits beyond those required for the single degree program are necessary 
and a minimum of an additional year of study is usually required. Individuals interested in a dual degree should contact the appropriate departmental office. 



188 



CtRRICULUM IN WOOD PRODUCTS 
Degree earned: B.S. in Wood Products 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CFR 134 Computers in Forest Resources 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 131 Analytic Geom. & Calculus A^ 

WPS 202 Wood Anatomy and Properties 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 

Phil., Relig. Vis/Perf. Arts Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 

3 CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 1 2 Comp. & Reading 

3 MA 23 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus B^ 

1 WPS 203 Wood Physical Properties 

3 Physical Education Elective' 

15 



Credits 



SUMMER SESSION 

WPS 205 Wood Products Practicum 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EC 201 Intro, to Economics I 

PY211 General Physics I 

Basic Science Elective 

Sci.. Technology, & Soc. Elective 

Free Elective 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 

PY 212 General Physics II 

ST 3 1 1 Intro, to Statistics 

WPS 350 Wood Products Literature 

History or Literature Elective 



Credits 
2 
4 
3 
2 
3 
14 



SUMMER SESSION 

WPS 210 Forest Products Internship 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 31 1 Comm. Engr. & Technology 

(Comm. or Sp. Elective) 

WPS 301 Wood Processing I 

WPS 3 19 Prin. of Wood Science 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 

Technical Elective' 



Spring Semester 

IE 31 1 Engineering Economics Analysis 

WPS 302 Wood Processing II 

WPS 344 Intro, to Quality Control 

History or Literature Elective 

Technical Elective' 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

WPS 441 Wood Mechanics 

WPS 482 Senior Topics in WPS 

Technical Electives' 

Free Elective 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 WPS 444 Wood Composites 

2 WPS 450 Wood Industry Case Studies 

6 ANT., GEO., PS., PSY., or SOC Elective 

3 Technical Elective' 
15 Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
14 



Minimum Hours Required Tor Graduation: 126 

'D grades not acceptable 

'Students with appropriate math aptitude are encouraged to register for MA 141 and MA 241 

'Technical Electives are selected from business, management, science or applied fields with advisor approval to meet the career goals of the student. 

•Foreign language proficiency at the FL 102 level is required of all NC State graduates. 

MINOR IN WOOD PRODUCTS 

The Wood Products minor is available to all undergraduate students, except Wood Products majors, enrolled In the university as degree candidates. Due to 
the various semester credit hours of the elective courses, the semester hours required for a this minor may be as low as 17 or as high as 20 credits. Eleven 
hours of required courses provide a general background in wood anatomy, physical properties, and wood-based composites. Elective courses (minimum two 
courses required) may be chosen from areas including wood processing, wood mechanics, quality control, and wood-polymer interactions. 
The Wood Products minor, with Its focus on wood properties and processing, is designed to be especially valuable to students majoring in programs leading 
to careers in areas such as structural design, fijmiture manufacturing, and forestry. Students interested In natural and renewable materials will also find the 
minor useful. 



189 



COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 



106 Caldwell Phone: (919)515-2468 

NCSU Box 8101 fax: (919)515-9419 

Raleigh. NC 27695-8101 E-mail: chass@ncsuedu 



MA. Zahn, Dean 

MM. Sawhney, Associate Dean 

M.T. Zingraft, Associate Dean of Research 

G.W. O'Brien, Associate Dean of Graduate Programs 

E.T. Funkhouser, Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs 

R.C. Kochers Berger. Assistant to the Dean for International Studies 

J.N. Wall, Director of Honors/Scholars Programs 

D.B. Greene, Coordinator of Arts Studies 

L.H. Hambourger, Coordinator of Evening Programs and Assistant to the Dean 

M.T. Leach, Academic Director of Diversity Affairs 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers programs of study which lead to baccalaureate and advanced degrees in the disciplines of the 
humanities and social sciences. The college also offers courses in these disciplines which are required in all undergraduate degree programs. In this way the 
university provides its students the opportunity to prepare for a full life in the professions and occupations that require intellectual flexibility, broad 
knowledge, and a basic comprehension of human beings and their problems. 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences is comprised of seven departments: Communication, English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, 
Philosophy and Religion, Political Science and Public Administration, and Sociology and Anthropology (also a department in the College of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences). The Division of Multidisciplinary Studies, an academic unit responsible for interdisciplinary programs, is affiliated with the college; the 
division also administers the Social Work Program. 

The college offers undergraduate majors in arts applications, communication. English, French, history, multidisciplinary studies, philosophy, political 
science, religious studies, social work, sociology, and Spanish. In addition, special options or concentrations are available within some of the major 
programs: communication disorders, mass communication, public relations, and theatre (major in communication); rhetoric, writing, and language (major in 
English); philosophy of law/law and political philosophy (major in philosophy or political science); anthropology (major in sociology), and criminal justice 
(major in political science or sociology). A Teacher Education Option is available in English. French, Spanish, and social studies (history, political science, 
sociology). Enrollments in teacher education programs may be limited. Degrees granted include the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science. Bachelor of 
Social Work, Master of Arts, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy, as well as professional degrees in political science and sociology. 

ACADEMIC MINORS: 

MINOR IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Students who wish to add a significant international dimension to their departmental majors may pursue the Minor in International Studies. This program 
enables students to explore international topics, issues, and research from cross-cultural, transnational perspectives. The program provides tools that students 
can use to understand better the global context of the modem world and to learn the international dimensions of their chosen field of study. 

MINOR IN MUSIC 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers a Minor in Music to all undergraduate students in the university. The music minor is designed to foster 
creative thought, aesthetic understanding, and artistic self-expression. A total of 18 credit hours must be taken to complete this minor with emphasis in 
performance, theory/composition or history /literature. Students are expected to demonsUate their level of musical/intellectual accomplishment in a public 
recital or through submission of papers summarizing results of concentrated analysis and research from one or more courses. Students interested in the minor 
should refer to the music minor curriculum listed under the Department of Music. 

DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAMS: 

ELI WHITNEY DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAM IN TEXTILES AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

This joint program between the College of Textiles and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences allows a student to earn a B.S. in Textile and Apparel 
Management and a B.A in Multidisciplinary Studies with a concentration in international studies. This dual degree is designed to prepare students for work 
in the increasingly international textile industry. The program includes all the technical course requirements associated with the textile and apparel 
management degree. For the B.A. in Multidisciplinary Studies, students choose from among three areas of concentration: the Pacific Rim (language study in 
Japanese or Chinese). Latin America (language study in Spanish), or Europe (language study in German or Italian). The program, which takes four to five 
years to complete, also includes possible overseas internships. Merit scholarship awards are available for high-achieving students who participate in the 
double degree program in textiles and international studies. For more information, contact Dr Helmut Hergeth. Textile Management and Technology. 3318 
Textile Building. (515-6574) or the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Affairs. College of Humanities and Social Sciences. 106 Caldwell Hall, (515-2468). 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

Cooperative Education in humanities and social sciences seeks to broaden the student's intellectual horizons and at the same time to provide an introduction 
to the world of business, industry, government, or finance in preparation for a career after graduation. In this program the freshman and senior years are 
usually spent on campus while the sophomore and junior years are devoted either to alternate periods of on-campus study and off-campus work or to a 
parallel arrangement of part-time work and part-time study on a continuous basis. The student is paid for work experiences by the employer. Ordinarily the 
program takes five years to complete, but those who are willing to attend summer school or take on a summer co-op assignment can finish in four years. 
Transfer students are eligible, and all interested students are urged to apply early in the academic year. The program is also open to graduate students 
although lessfime is required on work assignments. Further information may by obtained from Cooperative Education, 212 Peek Hall, (515-4421). 

190 



HONORS AND SCHOLARS PROGRAMS: 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences sponsors the Scholars of the College Program (part of the University Scholars Programs) for students who 
show exceptional academic promise. The participants in this residential program take special sections of freshman- and sophomore-level courses and 
participate in a series of cultural events and weekly forums. In their junior year they participate in special Junior Scholars seminars and attend monthly 
forums. For upper-level students, each department in the college offers an honors program designed to encourage outstanding students to develop their 
intellectual potential to the fullest extent possible through individualized study, special seminars, and close association with faculty members in their major 
field. 

JEFFERSON SCHOLARS IN AGRICULTURE AND THE HUMANITIES 

The Thomas Jefferson Scholars Program in Agriculture/Life Sciences and the Humanities is ajoint program of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. It is a double degree which permits participants to have two concentrations: one in an area of 

agriculture/life sciences and one in an area of humanities/social sciences. The double degree program may be individually designed to meet each student's 

particular interests and career goals. The purpose of the program is to produce potential leaders in agriculture and the life sciences who have not only 

technical expertise but also an appreciation for the social, political, and cultural issues that affect decision-making. 

Each spring a number of entering freshmen are chosen to receive scholarships to participate in the Jefferson program. In addition, other qualified students 

may choose to pursue a double major in agriculture/life sciences and the humanities under the Jefferson program. 

Students interested in applying to the Jefferson Scholars program should contact Dr. George Barthalmus, Associate Dean, College of Agriculture and Life 

Sciences, Box 7642, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (515-2615) or Dr. Edward T. Funkhouser, Assistant Dean, College of Humanities 

and Social Sciences, Box 8101, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (515-2467), before January 15. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

A limited number of freshmen in the College of Engineering are selected to participate in the Benjamin Franklin Scholars program. In addition to their major 
courses, each Benjamin Franklin Scholar develops an individualized, five-year plan of work focused on a central theme in the humanities and social 
sciences. Students completing the program receive a Bachelor of Science degree in an engineering discipline or computer science and a bachelor's degree in 
multidisciplinary studies. 

This double-degree program, ajoint undertaking of the College of Engineering and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, provides a unique 
opportunity to integrate a solid base of knowledge in technology or science with the broad philosophical perspective of the humanities. The curriculum for 
the double-degree program has four main components: a strong general education, specially designed interdisciplinary and problem-defining courses, all 
technical course requirements associated with the engineering or computer science degree, and a 30-hour multidisciplinary concentration designed by 
students in consultation with their advisers. With careful planning, this program can be completed in five years. 

For more information, contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Engineering, 1 1 8 Page Hall, or the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate 
Affairs, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 106 Caldwell Hall. 

GIFFORD PINCHOT SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The Gifford Pinchot Scholars Program, ajoint program with the College of Forest Resources, follows the model established by other double degree 
programs. Academically talented students are invited to pursue simultaneously a B.S. degree in Forest Management through the College of Forest Resources 
and a B.A. degree in a major in Humanities and Social Sciences through the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The Pinchot Scholars Program is 
limited to a small number (10 or fewer per year) of highly qualified and motivated students. Scholarship support is available to some participants in the 
Pinchot Scholars Program. 

Pinchot Scholars follow the requirements for the B.S. in Forest Management (with one exception: the physics sequence PY 21 1-2I2 is not required). For the 
B.A. degree, they follow a 30-hour major concentration in multidisciplinary studies. Included in this major are two core requirements: MDS 340 
Perspectives in Agricultural History (3 credits) and MDS 498 Senior Thesis (3 credits). Participants also complete an additional MDS seminar (I credit). In 
addition, Pinchot Scholars complete all the general education requirements for a B.A degree in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. A total of 155 
credit hours is required for the double degree which students can complete in four and a half years. 

The theme of the multidisciplinary studies major will involve placing forest management in the context of cross-cultural perspectives, global issues, and 
public policy. The exact set of courses that will constitute the major will be determined by students in consultation with their advisory group, subject to the 
approval of the Multidisciplinary Studies Committee. Each student is assigned an advisory group consisting of an academic advisor from each college, plus a 
mentor from the forest industry. Pinchot Scholars also participate in existing cooperative activities with other double-degree program scholars. For more 
information, contact the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Forest Resources, 1022-N Biltmore, Box 8001 or the Assistant Dean for 
Undergraduate Academic Affairs, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 106 Caldwell, Box 8I0I. 

DaVTNCI SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The DaVinci Scholars Program is ajoint program between the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the School of Design. Students completing the 
DaVinci Scholars Program will earn two degrees within five or six years: a bachelor's degree in one of the five undergraduate disciplines in the School of 
Design and a B.A. or B.S. degree in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. DaVinci Scholars will earn their first degree in design with no 
adjustment in their design requirements. They will elect a second major from any of those available in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 
including Multidisciplinary Studies. They must meet all requirements for both degrees. 

The primary purpose of the double degree program is to provide students with a strong liberal education as a complement to their professional degree study. 
In some cases, however, students will also improve their employment opportunities by selecting study that directly supports their professional in design. For 
example, students majoring in graphic design who take a second degree that focuses on writing improve their opportunities for employment in 
communications. A student in architecture with a second degree in history may improve opportunities for graduate study in architectural history, 
preservation, or urban planning. Study of foreign language may improve opportunities for international design practice. 

Students who wish to participate in the DaVinci Scholars should apply to the Associate Dean of the School of Design within their first semester of study in 
the School of Design and by the time of formal declaration of major in their second semester of study. DaVinci Scholars will participate in special programs 
and meet as a group for regular discussions and advising. Interdisciplinary seminars led by School of Design and College of Humanities and Social Sciences 
faculty will focus on issues relevant to the nature of the disciplines. Other programs may include lectures and field trips. Depending on the availability of 
funds, DaVinci scholars will receive scholarships toward participation in the program. 



191 



SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

In addition to the university-wide awards available, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers the following merit scholarships to entering 
freshmen: 

J. Carlie Adams, Sr. Endowed Scholarship ($500) 

Bess B. and Lynton Yates Ballentine Scholarship ($1000) 

Frances W. and Gerald O. T. Erdahl Memorial Scholarship ($1000) 

Other departmental scholarships include: 

Claire Simmons Allan-Samson Memorial Scholarship in Moral Philosophy ($1000) 

Mary M. Penney Scholarship in English ($1000) 

For further information contact: 

Dr. John Wall, Director, Honors/Scholars Program, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, North Carolina State University, Box 8105, Raleigh, NC 
27695-8105 

FOLGER INSTITUTE 

North Carolina State University is a member of the Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies, a unique collaborative enterprise 
sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, and 20 universities in the Middle Atlantic region. Each year the institute offers an 
interdisciplinary program in the humanities — seminars, workshops, symposia, colloquia, and lectures. Admission is open to faculty and students of North 
Carolina State University, and a limited number of fellowships are available through the campus Folger Institute Committee. 

ALEXANDER HAMILTON SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The Alexander Hamilton Scholars Program permits students to earn a B.A. in Multidisciplinary Studies emphasizing international studies and a B.S. in 
Accounting, a B.S. in Business Management, or a B.A. in Economics. The B.A. in Multidisciplinary Studies is a specially designed program focusing on a 
specific region of the world and one of its major languages. Students may choose from the following regions: China or Japan and the Pacific Rim, France or 
Germany and Western Europe, Francophonic Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. 

Key elements of the Alexander Hamilton Program include at least three semesters of foreign language study beyond the level required for admission to the 
University, at least two courses in history, political science, literature, or anthropology directed specifically at the region of study, a management capstone 
course (business policy and strategy or economics seminar) with a strong global orientation, and several additional courses on topics such as international 
relations, global affairs, and intercultural communication. Each Hamilton scholar is required to complete at least one field experience lasting a minimum of 
six weeks which will provide immersion in the language and culture of the student's focus region. 

Hamilton scholars will participate in special programs throughout their enrollment that are designed to increase their exposure to leading-edge management 
practices, international business, and foreign cultures. These programs will include activities such as special lectures and seminars, corporate tours and field 
trips, and scholar's banquets. For additional information about the Alexander Hamilton Scholars Program, contact the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, 
College of Management, 1 12 Nelson Hall, or the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 106 
Caldwell Hall. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION www.ncsu.edu/chass/communication/ 

Winston Hall, Room 201 
Phone: (919)515-2450 

J. C. Hammerback, Head 

C. R. Branker, Assistant Head 

P. N. Long, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: L.R. Camp, R.M. Entman, W.J. Jordan, J.C. Hammerback, L.W. Long, R.L. Schrag; Professors Emeriti: W.G. Franklin, C.A. Parker; Associate 
Professors: P.C. Caple, DA. DeJoy, E.T. Funkhouser, V.J. Gallagher, M. Javidi, R. Leonard, H.E. Munn Jr., B.L. Russell; Assistant Professors: T. Hallett, 
M. Johnson, A. Lucchetti, J. Macoubrie, N.H. Snow, S. Wiley; Lecturers: J. Alchediak, C. R. Branker, J. Heaton, T.J. Kauffman, P.N. Long, M.F. Pandich, 
S. Stein; Teaching Technician: i. Willard. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Communication program provides study and training in human communication for professionals entering business, industry, non- 
profit organizations, or government service. Today, many organizations are seeking graduates with demonstrated competencies in human communication to 
fill positions which require constant and skillfiil contact with a wide variety of internal and external publics. Depending upon their area of specialization, 
graduates may find employment opportunities in positions such as communication consultants, media specialists, trainers, public relations specialists, 
therapists, or performers. Many graduates choose to enter graduate or law schools. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The Communication major calls for successftil completion of at least 36 semester credit hours of Communication (COM) courses. Three of these courses, 
COM 110, COM 1 12, and COM 190, totaling nine semester credit hours, are completed by all students majoring in Communication. The remaining credit 
hours in the major come from courses completed in one or more of the following concentrations offered by the Department of Communication: 

Communication Disorders: The undergraduate portion of preparation for Speech-Language Therapist or Audiologist careers. A Master's degree is 

required for entry into these professions. 

Mass Communication: A broad curriculum in the structure, operation, and social effects of the mass media in the United States with emphasis on 

electronic media, including courses in broadcast and non-broadcast media writing and production, media criticism, and media history. 

Public and Interpersonal Communication: A curriculum emphasizing analytical and skills approaches to the study of human communication 

processes and problems. 

Public Relations: Instruction in the communication theories and methods applied by organizations to establish and maintain mutually beneficial 

relationships with employees, governments, stock holders, and other publics. 

Theatre: Studies in stage directing, acting, scenic and lighting design, and stagecraft. African-American dramaturgy and children's touring theatre are 

special features of this program. Courses are taught at Thompson Theatre on the NC State campus. 

192 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in Communication provides academically talented students an opportunity to expand their curriculum and abilities through in-depth, 
guided study. Candidates for the program must have achieved junior standing with aTGPAof at least 3.250 and a minimum 3.500 GPA in the minor after 
completion of at least nine credits of Communication courses. 

Students admitted to the program must complete a total of nine credit hours in at least two of the following three types of courses: COM 300 and 400-level 
honors or honors contract courses, COM 500-level courses and an Honors senior thesis seminar (3 credits). Honors students will select and work closely 
with an honors faculty adviser. 

Students who complete a plan of study meeting the above requirements and graduate with a minimum TGPA of 3,250 and a GPA for Communication 
courses of at least 3.500 will have successfully completed the Communication honors program. Completion of the program will be noted on the student's 
transcript and diploma, and in the commencement and honors convocation programs. 

CURRICULUM NOTES 

• Students must enroll in COM 190 during their first semester as a Communication major. 

• A student must have completed 1 5 hours at NC State with a minimum overall GPA of 2.700 to transfer upon request from another NC State 
curriculum into the Communication major. Students with GPAs less than 2.700 but above 2.000 may apply for admission to the major. Two 
application periods are scheduled each year. Contact the department for an application form and deadline information. 

• No final grades below "C" are permitted for courses used in the Communication major. 

• To qualify for graduation, each student must have a minimum GPA of 2.000 for all courses completed at NC State, and at least a 2.000 GPA for 
all courses taken in the Communication major. 

• COM 146, Business and Professional Communication, is intended for students in majors other than Communication. Students majoring In 
Communication may not use this course to satisfy any requirement within the 36-credit-hour major. 

MINORS 

A minor in Theatre is offered. Also, the Communication Department and the Departments of English and Multidisciplinary Studies jointly offer a Film 
Studies minor. Literature detailing the requirements for these minors is available at the main department office. Those interested in the Journalism minor at 
NC State should contact the English Department. 

INTERNSHIPS 

The Department operates an internship program which offers qualified Seniors the opportunity to gain work experience in the Communication field. The 
internship is required of all students in the Public Relations concentration, but students from the other Communication concentrations may also participate in 
this program. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH www.chass.ncsu.edu/english/ 

Tompkins Hall, Rooms 131, 246 
Phone: (919)515-3866 

T. D. Lisk. Head 

C. A. Prioli, Associate Head 

B. M. B\ackiey.Assislanl Head for Scheduling 

L. T. Holley, Coordinator of Advising 

R. V. Young, Director of Graduate Programs 

J. Ferster, Director of the Freshman Program 

William C. Friday Distinguished Professor: Walt A. Wolfram; /f/umn/ Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: M.T. Hesler.Professors: B.J. Baines, J.W. 
Clark, J. Ferster, J.A. Gomez, J.M. Grimwood, AH. Harrison, M.T. Hester, L.T. Holley, J.J. Kessel, L.H. MacKethan, WE. Meyers, C.R. Miller, C.A. 
Prioli, L. Smith, J.J. Smoot, A.F. Stein, J.N. Wall Jr., W. Wolfram, R.V. Young, Professors Emeriti: G.W. Barrax, P.E. Blank Jr., L.S. Champion (Alumni 
Distinguished Undergraduate Professor), J.D. Durant, M. Halperen, H.G. Kincheloe, A.S. Knowles, B.G. Koonce, F.H. Moore, M.S. Reynolds, M.C. 
Williams, P. Williams Jr.; Associate Professors: E.Y. Amiran, L.J. Betts, M.P. Carter, D.H. Covington. A.M. Davis-Gardner, C. Gross, D. Herman, S.B. 
Katz, M.F. King, R.C. Kochersberger, R.C. Lane, D.L. Laryea, J.E. Morrison, C. Nwankwo, ME. Orr, A.M. Penrose, JO. Pettis, L.R. Severin, J.J. Small, 
J.F. Thompson, H.C. West DB. Wyrkk; Assistant Professors: S. Dicks, M. Douglas, C. Haller, N. Halpem, W.E.Haskin, S.M. Katz, D.E. Keetley, P. 
LaCoste, L. May. B. Mehlenbacher. J.D. Morillo, M. Pramaggiore. S.M. Setzer. K. Shepherd-Barr, E. Thomas. C. Warren, T. V/e]donSenior Lecturer: P.R. 
Cockshutt. 

The Department of English offers basic and advanced courses in writing, language, and literature. The freshman courses, required of all undergraduate 
students, develop skill in expository writing and in analytical reading of literary and non-literary works. Advanced courses in writing available to all students 
cover a variety of areas, including journalism, technical and business writing, and creative writing. These courses give students opportunities to pursue 
special personal and career interests, as do courses in literature, linguistics, film, and folklore. 

The department offers a Bachelor of Arts major in English with four options: language and literature; worid literature; rhetoric, writing, and language; and 
teacher education. It also offers a Bachelor of Science major. Internships available to qualified students provide practical experience as well as an 
understanding of how academic studies are relevant to the workplace. 

In addition, the department offers two graduate degrees: a Master of Arts in English and a Master of Science in Technical Communication. (See Graduate 
Catalog for details.) 

A five-course certificate program in Professional Writing, available to students not seeking a degree at NC State, offers preparation in practical writing and 
editing, including both journalism and technical writing. 

OPPORTI'NITIES 

A degree in English provides both liberal education and practical knowledge about the role of writing and language in the everyday worid. It leads to careers 
in such fields as teaching, journalism, advertising, public relations, personnel management, technical writing, business writing, and creative writing. It 
sharpens the analytical and interpretive skills needed for professional and managerial careers, and it serves as an excellent preparation for students planning 
to study law or medicine and for those intending to do graduate work in literature and rhetoric. 

193 



ENGLISH HONORS PROGRAM 

The Honors Program in English provides courses that enrich the intellectual life of the English major. The Honors student contributes to and learns from 
seminar settings, takes up the obligation of independent study, produces documents representing sustained and logically articulated research practices, and 
earns recognition for excellent work beyond ordinary requirements. 

For admission, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.000, and must have completed at least three English courses above the freshman level with a 
minimum GPA of 3.250. Successful completion of the Honors Program requires completion of 9 hours of honors courses with grades of A or B, a GPA of at 
least 3.400 in NC State English courses and a minimum overall GPA of 3.250. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

Major in English, Language and Literature Option~The student must schedule 42 semester hours beyond the usual six hours in freshman composition. A 
core of 24 hours, including Infroduction to Literary Studies, is required of all majors. Beyond these courses, the student may pursue special interests within 
the limits of recommended categories. 

Major in English, World Literature Option-The Student must schedule 42 semester hours beyond the usual six hours in freshman composition. At least 21 
of these hours must consist of ENG or ENG/FL courses; at least 12 of them must consist of FL- or ENG/FL courses. A core of 33 hours, including 
Introduction to Literary Studies, meets requirements for courses in periods, regions, and methods. Students must achieve proficiency in a foreign language, 
usually at the 300 level. The Lawrence Rudner Option in World Literature enables students to achieve a fully- rounded education in literature by mixing 
courses in English and American literature with courses in foreign-language literatures. 

Major in English, Rhetoric, Writing, and Language Option~The student must schedule 42 semester hours beyond the usual six hours in freshman 
composition. For their 18 hours of English electives, students choose at least 6 hours in concepts and theories and 6 hours in practical applications, with an 
additional 6 hours in either area. This combination allows students to learn how to write and design documents for specific uses, to understand why sfrategies 
work, and to develop resources for solving new problems. With appropriate electives and a choice of a minor, students may prepare for careers in journalism, 
technical writing, information services, or creative writing or may enter graduate study in these areas or in rhetoric and composition. 

MAJOR IN ENGLISH, CONCENTRATION IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

English majors may enroll in the Teacher Education Option offered by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences in cooperation with the College of 
Education and Psychology. Students who complete this program are eligible to apply for the certification to teach English in secondary schools in North 
Carolina. The requirements of the program include 33 semester hours in professional courses and 36 semester hours in English beyond the usual six hours in 
freshman composition (total 128 credit hours required for graduation). Students desiring to enter this program should declare their intention before the spring 
of the sophomore year. Students are required to file a formal application for admission which must be approved in order for them to participate. Enrollments 
in the Teacher Education Option may be limited. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH 

Major in English-Students, in consultation with their departmental advisers, must schedule 30 semester hours beyond the usual six hours In freshman 
composition. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

The Department of English offers a Minor in English to majors in any field except English. To fulfill this minor, students must: 

• complete 15 hours ( 5 English courses) at or above the 200 level 

• take at least 6 hours (2 courses) at or above the 300 level 

• take at least 3 hours ( 1 course) at or above the 400 level 

• earn a grade of C or better in all courses credited to the minor. 

MINOR IN JOURNALISM 

With the Department of Communication, the Department of English offers a Minor in Journalism, open to students in any major. It consists of the following 
courses: ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 315, COM 204, and one of the following: COM 234, COM 334, COM 421. A grade of C or better is required in all 
courses. 

MINOR IN LINGUISTICS 

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and the Department of English offer a Minor in Linguistics to majors in any field. Among students 

likely to be attracted to the minor are those interested in second language acquisition. 

To complete the minor fifteen hours of designated courses are required, as well as the completion of a foreign language through the 202 level. 

MINOR IN WORLD LITERATURE 

The Departments of English and of Foreign Languages and Literatures offer a Minor in World Literature to all undergraduate students. It requires six 
courses: FL 350, CL 495, and four courses in one or more literatures (other than a student's major) chosen from an approved list. A grade of C or better is 
required in all courses. 

MINOR IN TECHNICAL AND SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION (TSC) 

The department of English offers a Minor in Technical and Scientific Communication (TSC) for students not majoring in English interested in 
supplementing their studies in technical, scientific, or other fields. In addition to gaining valuable skills in document design, editing, collaboration, and 
revision, students minoring in TSC will be introduced to numerous genres including proposals, reports, science writing, users guides, reference manuals, and 
online documentation. Critical perspectives towards the role of communication in the creation of scientific and technical knowledge will be examined. 
Fifteen hours of course work are required to complete the minor: ENG 214, ENG 314, one of ENG 331, ENG 332, or ENG 333, ENG 421, and one of ENG 
425, ENG 520, or ENG 583 (Usability Studies, number to be designated). 



194 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES hnp://sasw.chass ncsu edu/d/fl htm 

1911 Building, Room 117 
Phone: (919)515-2475 

L.R. Schehr, Head 

D.M. Marchi, Assistant Head 

A.B. Kennedy, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: T.P. Feeny, G.F. Gonzalez, J.R. Kelly, L.R. Schehr, M.L. Sosower, J.H. Stewart, M.A. \^\\X.Professors Emeriti: A. A. Gonzalez, M. Paschal, 
G.W. Poland, E.M. Stack; Associate Professors: S.T. Alonso, V. Bilenkin, H.G. Braunbeck, G.A. Dawes, M.M. Magill, A.C. Malinowski, D.M. Marchi, 
L.A. Mykyta, Y.B. Rollins, M.L. Salstad; /Jwoc/afe Professors Emeriti: R.A. Alder, W.M. Holler, V.M. Prichard, S.E. Simonsen, H. Tucker )r.:Assislant 
Professors: J.S. Despain. M.D. Garval, H. James, J.M. Levis, J. Man, J. P. Mertz, G.P. Meyjes. A. Tay, Lecturers: D.F. Adler, A.B. Kennedy. S. Navey- 
Davis, Q.Q. Sun. 

OPPORTirNITIES 

The expansion of international relations makes the knowledge of foreign languages a critical need for today's professional. The student of foreign languages 
is not limited to teaching, translating or interpreting. There are careers in politics, diplomacy, commerce, business, agriculture, science, and research in 
which a thorough knowledge of foreign languages is crucial for success. The demand for multilingual personnel extends to all fields of human enterprise and 
will continue to grow in the coming years. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH OR SPANISH 

All the general requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree must be met, including six hours of literature survey within the Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures or in British and American literature or any combination of these. Degree designations are B.A. in French Language and 
Literature, B.A. in Spanish Language and Literature, B.A. in French Language and Literature with Teacher Education Option, and B.A. in Spanish Language 
and Literature with Teacher Education Option. 

Outstanding students may become members of the Alpha Lambda chapter of Phi Sigma Iota. National Foreign Languages Honor Society; of the Xi Omicron 
chapter of Sigma Delta Pi, National Hispanic Honor Society; and of the Gamma Alpha chapter of Debra Slav., National Slavic Honor Society. A 
departmental honors program in French and Spanish is also available to eligible students. 

Major In French or Spanish-Students must complete 36 hours beyond the 201 level, including a senior seminar/capstone course. Majors must take 12 
additional hours of advised electives. These are waived for students who choose to double major (in Business Management or Political Science, for 
example), and for those who choose the Teacher Education Option. 

Major in French or Spanish with Teacher Education Option In collaboration with the College of Education and Psychology and the Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers a program leading to a French or Spanish teaching license in North 
Carolina, grades K-12. 

The requirements of the program include 30 semester hours in professional education classes and 39 semester hours in French and Spanish beyond the 102 
level. Candidates must consult with their academic adviser as early as possible for the proper planning of their curriculum. Application for admission to 
teacher education candidacy is made during the spring 
semester of the sophomore year. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The Honors Program in Foreign Languages and Literatures assists academically talented majors to realize their fullest potential as undergraduates in the 

field. To participate, students must have a TEPA of 3.000+ and SPA of 3.250+ after 9 hours in the major. 

Successful completion of the program requires an overall GPA of 3.250+, with 9+ hours of Honors work, at least 6 of them in Foreign Languages and 

Literatures. 

Students will extend their critical thinking skills, refine foreign language skills, and discover significant scholarly areas of particular interest to them through 
various avenues, such as: Honors options in regular classes, in which students explore the material in greater depth or breadth; development and execution of 
an independent project, assisted by a faculty mentor and; an approved study abroad project. Completion of departmental Honors is noted on the student's 
transcript and diploma and at Commencement. 

PROGRAMS ABR0.4D 

Summer study programs are offered in Austria, France, Germany, India, Mexico, Taiwan, and semester-long programs in Spain and France. 

MINOR IN CLASSICAL STUDIES 

The Minor in Classical Studies offers an excellent foundation for advanced work in other academic disciplines as well as professional programs in law, 
medicine, and finance The minor gives students an opportunity to develop a keener perception and better understanding of the cultural forces at work in the 
contemporary world. And by presenting a broad selection of courses in the various disciplines of literature, philosophy, and histor>', the minor provides 
students with a sound introduction to studies in antiquity. 

Requirements for the minor include five courses selected from the following: GRK 20 1 or LAT 20 1 ; GRK 3 1 or GRK 320; PHI 300 or REL 3 1 2; HI 403 or 
HI 404; and HI 405 or 406. 

MINORS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES. AND CULTURES 

Minor programs in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures include courses in language, literature, and civilization. The minor program 
requires 15 hours of study in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, or Spanish, beginning at the 201 level; in Classical Greek, beginning at 
the 101 level. 

Undergraduate students majoring in any area of study at NC Stale are eligible to minor in a foreign language. Students may not, however, major and minor 
in the same language. 



195 



MINOR IN JAPANESE STUDIES 

Students who take a Minor in Japan Studies are required to complete, with a grade of C or better, 18 hours of courses distributed as follows: Tested language 
competence through FLJ 202, with at least six hours of Japanese language instruction at NC State at or above the FLJ 201 level and four of the following 
cognate courses: EC 470; ENG/FL 394; HI 263; HI 472; PS 342; PS 346; MDS 295. With the Minor adviser's approval, additional Japan-related classes may 
be used to fulfill the cognate course requirement. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY www.ncsu.edu/chass/history/ 

Harrelson Hall, Room 162 
Phone: (919)515-3307 

E. Sylla, Interim Head 

J.E. Crisp, Assistant Head 

DA. Zonderman, Coordinator of Advising 

Gail O'Brien, Director of Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor Emeritus: B.F. Beers,AIumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: J.P. Hobbs, J.M. Riddle; Alumni 
Distinguished Professor (for graduate teaching): J.D. Sm\M\;Professors: JR. Banker, C.H. Carlton, A.J. De Grand, DP. Gilmartin, W.C. Harris, J.P. Hobbs, 
A.J. La Vopa, L.O. McMurry, G.W. O'Brien, J.K. Ocko, S.T. Parker, J.M. Riddle, R.H. Sack, R.W. Slatta, J.D. Smith, ED. Sylla, K.S. V'mQentJ'rofessors 
Emeriti: M.L. Brown, M. S. Downs, R.W. Greenlaw, DE. King, L.W. Seegers, ME. Wheeler, B.W. Wishy; Associate Professors: J.E. Crisp, W.A. Jackson, 
O.J, Kalinga, W.C. Kimler, K.P. Luria, S. Middleton, S.L. Spencer, G.D. Surh, P. Tyler, K..P. Vickery. Associate Professor Emeritus: R.N. Elliott, J.A. 
Mulholland; ,4.s,soc;a/e Members of the Faculty: F.A. Moyer;^«/,sMn/ Professors: D. Ambaras, R. Bassett, H. Brewer, A.F. Khater, M.KIm, A. Mitchell; 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: V.L. Berger, J.W. Caddell, J.C. Cashion, J.J. Crow, HE. Mattox, D.J. Olson, W.S. Price Jr., H.K. Steen; Lecturer: J. Woodard 

An understanding of the historical background of our times is expected of the educated person. The Department of History makes it possible for students to 
gain this understanding through a wide range and variety of courses at all levels from introductory through graduate. 

A broad offering of introductory courses is available to satisfy the undergraduate history requirement or part of the humanities and social sciences 
requirements in most university curricula Students in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences are required to take two courses in history — one 
dealing with a culture significantly different from our own in pre-industrial Western or non-Western societies and the other dealing with our own culture in 
the United States or post-industrial Western societies. 

Honors students are eligible for membership in Phi Alpha Theta, the national history honorary society. Some introductory and advanced undergraduate 
courses and graduate courses are offered in the evening. 

The department offers two Master of Arts degrees. Students interested in enhancing their understanding of history, obtaining advanced teaching credentials, 
or pursuing doctoral work elsewhere may take the traditional graduate program. Students interested in applied history may take the public history program. 
Some financial assistance is available. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

A history major has traditionally served as a foundation for careers in such professions as teaching and law. In recent years undergraduates have frequently 
augmented studies in history with computer science, foreign language, or business administration, combinations which have proved attractive in business 
and government service. 

The prospect of new career ladders in public education has prompted renewed interest in an M.A. in history with advanced teaching certification. 
Multiplication of records of every kind has created a steady demand for historians with master's degrees in applied or public history. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The departmental honors program in History allows selected students to pursue intensive, individually directed work in history. Students are invited to enter 
the honors program (usually in the junior year) if they have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.000. and a history GPA of a least 3.300, with a minimum of 9 
history hours completed. Students must take 9 hours of individual, directed study (HI498, 495, 496) leading toward the writing of an Honors Thesis. 
Students must also take an extra history seminar (HI 491) and participate for two semesters in a non-credit honors reading seminar. 

To graduate with honors in history, a minimum history GPA of 3.300 and an overall GPA of 3.250 is required. Graduating honors students receive 
recognition at commencement and an "honors" designation on their permanent record. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

A history major must take 30 hours of course work in history in addition to the six hours required of all students in the College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences. These 30 hours must include a 491 seminar. At least 24 of the 30 hours must be at the 400 level. Sufficient courses are offered to complete the 
history requirements for the B.A. in the evening. 

Major in History with Social Studies Teacher Education -History majors may enroll in the teacher education program offered by the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences in cooperation with the College of Education and Psychology. Students who complete this program are eligible for 
certification to teach social studies in secondary schools in North Carolina. 

In addition to the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements, students are required to take professional courses in education and psychology and additional social 
sciences courses (126 credit hours required for graduation). Students desiring to enter this program should declare their intention during their sophomore 
year. Admission is competitive and the limited in Teacher Education Option programs. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HISTORY 

A Bachelor of Science in History involves 27 hours of course work, with 15 hours at the 400 level, including an HI 491 seminar. 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

A Minor in History shall consist of six courses in history; one introductory course in pre-industrial or non-Western history (i.e., HI 207, 208, 209, 215, 216, 
263, 264, 275, or 276); one introductory course in United States or post-industrial Western history (i.e., HI 205, 2 1 0, 22 1 , 222, 233, 25 1 , or 252); four three- 

196 



hour courses in history at the 300 level or above, two of which must be at the 400 level. All six courses must be completed with a grade of C or better to 
satisfy the requirements of the minor. 

DIVISION OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES www2 ncsu edu/ncsu/chass/mds 

2806 Hillsborough Street 
Phone: (919)515-2470 

CD. Korte, Head and Director of Graduate Programs 
P.W. Hamlett, Assistant Head 

Professors: D.B. Greene, CD. Kone. Professors Emeriti: D.A. Adams, A.C Baiefool. Associate Professors: CC. Brookins, P.W. Hamlett, R.L Hoffman, 
L. Severin, R.A. Waschka II; Assistant Professors: D. Crumbley, J. Herkert, S. Warren; Lecturers: E. Malloy-Hanley, C.L. Stalnaker. 

Multidisciplinary Studies Degree Committee: 

C Crossland. Curriculum and Instruction 

A. Kennedy, Foreign Languages and Literatures 

J. Wallace, Sociology and Anthropology' 

T.L. Honeycutt, Computer Science 

C B. Kimbrough, Business Management 

C.L. Stalnaker. \tulltdisciplinary Studies. Chair 

E. Malloy-Hanley. Multidisciplinary Studies 

R. Hoffman, Multidisciplinary Studies 

W. Jordan, Communications 

Multidisciplinary Studies is an academic unit responsible for interdisciplinary programs dealing with contemporary and historical issues and problems. 
Courses are ot\en taught by teams of faculty drawn from the division and from the academic disciplines relating to the problems or issues under 
consideration These courses are open to students in all curricula. In addition, the Social Work Program is administered as part of the Division of 
Multidisciplinary Studies. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

The Multidisciplinary Studies program allows students to design their own academic majors. Instead of following the requirements for a major in one of the 
U-aditional disciplines, the candidate for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in Multidisciplinary Studies has the responsibility of organizing 
a concentration or field of specialization from one or more disciplines. A concentration in Latin American Studies might for example, combine related 
courses in language, literature, history, economics, sociology, and political science. 

The freshman and sophomore basic requirements for the multidisciplinary studies program are the same as for the other Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 
Science programs in humanities and social sciences. In satisfying basic requirements in language, humanities, social science, mathematics, and natural 
science, students should, whenever possible, choose those courses that are most appropriate as background for the courses in their major concentrations. 

To become candidates for a self-designed major in multidisciplinary studies, students must first get application forms and information from the office of the 
Division of Multidisciplinary Studies, 2806 Hillsborough Street and then prepare a tentative proposal which includes a list of courses comprising 30 credit 
hours for the B.A. and 27 credit hours for the B S. and an essay of 500 words explaining the reasons for making this set of courses the field of specialization. 
The student's proposal is reviewed by a faculty sponsor and submitted to the Multidisciplinary Studies Degree Committee for consideration. 

Afler a thorough examination to determine whether the set of courses proposed as a multidisciplinary major is academically sound and coherent, the 
committee will recommend that the Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences accept the proposals, or they will be sent back to the students and their sponsors 
with suggestions for modification and resubmission. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ARTS APPLICATIONS 

The Division of Multidisciplinar> Studies also offers a degree program in Arts Applications which allows students to develop a foundation in one of the arts 
and, on that foundation, leam the social or technological applications of the arts in a modem world. Examples are computers and the aits, scientific 
illustration, arts management and arts education. 

Students take 2 1 hours in foundation courses, 6 hours in linking courses (such as computers and music or arts and politics), a 3-hour capstone course (MDS 
494) designed for Arts Application majors, and an advised elective to support their particular interests and career objectives. To enroll in the program, 
student come to the Arts Studies Office, Room 242 in the 1911 Building. 

HONORS PROGRA.M 

The Honors Program in Multidisciplinary Studies provides able students the opportunity to integrate the various strands of their concentrations in a capstone 
project. The program also provides a context in which students can sharpen their thinking on the unique challenges and opportunities of interdisciplinary 
work. 

To be admitted into the MDS Honors Program, students must have earned nine credit hours in their MDS concentrations, have an overall GPA of 3.000 and 
a major GPA of 3.250. 

To graduate with Honors in MDS students must have a GPA of 3.250, and must have completed the MDS capstone course, " Independent Studies for MDS 
Honors Students," and have earned six additional credit hours in courses that are both Honors courses and also part of their MDS concentrations. 

MINOR IN AFRICANA STUDIES 

The Minor in Afiricana Studies provides a comparative and interdisciplinary study of the Black experience in Africa and the Americas. Three required 
courses include an Introduction to African-American Studies (MDS 240), Black American Literature (ENG 248). and Afro-American History (HI 372 or 
373). Two elective courses may be selected from a list of designated courses in such disciplines as anthropology, history, language, sociology, social work, 
and communication. The minor is designed to bring together students from diverse backgrounds and curricula who share a common interest In the African 
American experience. 

197 



MINOR IN ARTS STUDIES 

The Minor in Arts Studies is open to all undergraduate majors in the university. This interdisciplinary minor is designed to enrich the student's university 
experience, to serve as a foundation for learning and understanding in the arts beyond the university years, and to stimulate intellectual development in ways 
that may reinforce or complement the objectives of the student's major. This minor provides the student with a fundamental understanding of the historical, 
theoretical, and practical disciplines of the arts. 

A total of eighteen credit hours must be taken to complete this minor. Students interested in the minor should refer to the Arts Studies courses listed under 
"Arts Studies" in the course description section of this catalog. These courses are described in detail under their departmental prefixes. 

MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

The Environmental Science Minor provides a pathway for students from all disciplined to acquire a basic understanding of their biophysical and 
socioecomomic environments, and the effects of humankind's activities upon these environments. With this knowledge, individuals will be better able to 
interpret environmental issues that emerge daily, and to influence public and private activities that affect the environment. 

The minor consists of 15 credit hours of course work, selected from more than 20 eligible courses subdivided into four groups. To complete the minor, a 
student must take at least one course from each group, plus one additional course. 

MINOR IN FILM STUDIES 

The Departments of English and of Communication and the Division of Multidisciplinary Studies offer a Minor in Film Studies. The minor provides an 
introduction to the nature of the film experience, some background in the history of the medium, and the opportunity for in-depth study of selected topics. 

Fifteen hours of course work are required to complete the minor: ENG 282 and either COM 364 or COM 374, plus nine credit hours selected from the 
following: ENG 382, ENG 492, COM 244, COM 364 or 374 (whichever course was not taken to fiilfill the requirement above), MDS 496, HI 336, and DN 
3 1 6 (prerequisite waived, consent of instructor). Any students taking this minor cannot count courses from the minor toward their majors. 

MINOR IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY 

The Minor in Science, Technology, and Society is a fifteen-hour, multidisciplinary minor providing students an opportunity to appreciate and understand 
better the roles that science and technology play in the larger sociocultural context. A goal of the minor is to help students develop the ability to order and 
integrate the diverse aspects of their educations. 

Two essential components of this ability are sensitivity to the moral dimensions of scientific and technological inquiry as affecting how people may live or 
want to live and an appreciation of the practical implications of scientific and technical theory. In addition, the Minor in Science, Technology, and Society 
enables students to increase the breadth of their familiarity with science and technology. 

MINOR IN WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES 

The Women's and Gender Studies Minor provides all students in the university the opportunity for interdisciplinary study in women's gender issues from a 
wide variety of cultures, backgrounds and historical eras. In addition, it introduces the often unacknowledged contributions made by women in various fields 
of endeavor through course offerings in nine departments, the undergraduate minor helps students to examine common assumptions about gender relations 
using feminist theory and methodologies across disciplinary boundaries. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION www2 ncsu edu/ncsu/chass/philo 

Winston Hall, Room 101 
Phone: (919)515-3214 

H.D. Levin, Interim Head 

M.K.. Cunningham, Coordinator of Advising 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors.VJ .R. Carter, T.H. Regan; Professors: W. Adler, W.R. Carter, J.Levine, CM. Pierce, T.H. Regan, 
A.D.VanDeVeer; Professors Emeriti: PA. Bredenberg, R.S. Bryiai;Associate Professors: D.F.Austin, J.W. Carroll, M.K.Cunningham, R.M. Hambourger, 
D.M.Jesseph, B.B.Levenbook, H.D.Levin, R.B.Mullin, R.O.Savage, T.K.Stewart; Associate Professors Emeriti: W.C. Fitzgerald, W.L.Highfill, 
R.S.Metzger; Assistant Professors: D.D. Auerbach, N.B. Dohrmann, T.J. Hinton, R.M Jaffe, C.L. Miller 

Philosophy and Religious Studies confront the most important questions with the most rigorous standards, relying on over two millennia of accumulated 
wisdom from the best minds. They provide excellent training for any line of work where there's value in the ability to think straight and express oneself 
clearly ~ virtually every line of work. Law school, medical school and other professional school admission boards know this. A double major in this 
department and another (e.g., political science for law, biochemistry for medicine) can make an applicant very attractive to a professional school. 
Majors receive excellent training for graduate school in Philosophy or Religious Studies, as is shown by the department's record in placing graduates in top 
graduate programs in each field. 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion is located on the World Wide Web at: http://www2.ncsu.edu/ncsu/chass/philo/ 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Claire Simmons Allan-Samson Memorial Scholarship in Moral Philosophy, a renewable scholarship of $1000 per year, will be awarded annually to 
worthy students who have expressed an interest in issues in animal rights. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

For students interested in postgraduate study, information compiled by post-college professional schools reveals that undergraduate majors in philosophy 
and religion who apply to graduate schools of management have in the past scored extremely well in combined total scores on the Graduate Management 
Admission Test, with exceptional scores on verbal fields. 

Those undergraduate philosophy majors who apply to law schools have been shown to be more likely to be admitted than virtually any other field 
represented. Students intending to study philosophy and religion in graduate programs have consistently scored much higher than other students on the 
verbal section of the Graduate Record Examination. Because of this capability of scoring so well on the various postgraduate tests, many businesses and 
industries welcome philosophy and religion majors into their training programs. 

198 



PHILOSOPHY HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in Philosophy offers an enriching and challenging educational experience lo qualified majors. 

Admission to the program requires junior standing, completion of nine hours in the major, and a 3.250 GPA overall and in the major. Honors students must 
complete at least nine credit hours of honors option course work in Philosophy (including PHI 335 and PHI 498) and write an honors thesis (PHI 498) to be 
evaluated by the instructor for PHI 498 and one other member of the Philosophy faculty. Graduation requires a 3.250 GPA overall and in the major. 

Successful completion of the program is noted on the student's transcript and diploma, and in the commencement and honors convocation programs. 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in Religious Studies guides outstanding majors in independent, critical inquiry of the academic study of religion. 

Admission to the program requires junior standing, completion of nine hours in the major, and a 3.250 GPA overall and in the major. Honors students must 
complete at least nine credit hours of honors option course work in Religious Studies (including at least one 400-level course) and write an honors paper as 
part of an independent study course (REL 498) which is evaluated by an honors committee. 

Graduation requires a 3.250 GPA overall and in the major. Successiul completion of the program is noted on the student's transcript and diploma, and in the 
commencement and honors convocation programs. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies must complete 33 credit hours in the major. The courses in religious studies must include one 

course in Western religious traditions (REL 317, 320, 323, 326, 327); one course in non-Westem religious traditions (REL 331, 332, 407, 408); one course 

in Biblical Studies (REL 202, 31 1, 312, 314; GRK 202); and a minimum of 9 hours of advanced studies (REL 402, 407, 408, 460, 481, 484, 491*,496', 

498*). 

• can be taken twice for credit 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy must complete 33 hours in philosophy, including the three hours in philosophy required of all CHASS 
students; either Logic (LOG 20 1 ) or Symbolic Logic (LOG 335); the courses in the development of Western philosophic thought (PHI 300 and 30 1 ); an 
introductory course in value theory (PHI 275 or 321); one advanced course in value theory (PHI 306. 309, 311,313, 322); two courses in contemporary 
philosophy (PHI 330, 33 1, 332, 333); one-credit writing courses in each of three core areas of philosophy (PHI 494, 495 and 496); the seminar Writing and 
Research in Philosophy (PHI 497); and two additional philosophy courses (other than PHI 250). 

Major in Philosophy with a Concentration in Philosophy of Law - The concentration requires 39 hours, with at least 27 hours in philosophy (in addition to 
either PHI 275 or PHI 321. which may be taken to meet college requirements) and at least 9 hours in political science. Three advised electives are required in 
addition to five core courses; PHI 309. PHI 312, PHI 313, PS 308, and PS 361. Four background courses (12 hours), and three writing courses (3 hours) 
must be taken: either Logic (LOG 201) or Symbolic Logic (LOG 335); the courses in the development of Western philosophic thought (PHI 300 and PHI 
301); either PHI 331 or PHI 332; and one-credit writing courses in each of three core areas of philosophy (PHI 494, 495, 496). 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Philosophy must complete 30 hours in philosophy, including the 3 hours in philosophy required of all CHASS 
students. These must include the courses in the history of Western philosophic thought (PHI 300 and PHI 301); Symbolic Logic (LOG 335); Philosophy of 
Science (PHI 340); an introductory course in value theory (PHI 275 or PHI 321); one advanced course in value theory (PHI 306, 309, 311,313, 322); one 
course in contemporary philosophy (PHI 330, 33 1, 332, 333); one-credit writing courses in each of three core areas of philosophy (PHI 494, 495 and 496); 
the seminar Writing and Research in Philosophy (PHI 497); and one additional philosophy course (other than PHI 250). 

MINORS 

Students wishing to take any of the following academic minors need to complete the departmental form declaring intention to do so. 

MINOR IN JAPAN STUDIES 

Students who take a Minor in Japan Studies are required to complete with a grade of C or better 18 hours of courses distributed as follows: Tested language 
competence through FLJ 202, with at least six hours of Japanese language instruction at NC State at or above the FLJ 201 level and four of the following 
cognate courses: EC 470; ENG/FL 394; HI 263; HI 472; PS 342; PS 346; MDS. With the Minor adviser's approval, additional Japan-related classes may be 
used to fulfill the cognate course requirement. 

MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

Students who take a Minor in Cognitive Science are required to complete with a grade of C or better fifteen hours of courses, distributed as follows: PSY 
320 (Cognitive Processes); PSY 340 (Environmental Ergonomics) or PSY 546 (Human Information Processing); PHI 331 (Philosophy of Language); PHI 
332 (Philosophy of Psychology); PHI/PSY 425/525 (Introduction to Cognitive Science). 

MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY 

Students who take a Minor in Philosophy are required to complete with a grade of C or better fifteen hours of courses in selected fields in philosophy, 
including a course in the history of philosophy (3 credit hours), a course in normative (ethics and ethics-related) philosophy (3 credit hours), a course other 
than one in normative philosophy, but not including logic or the history of philosophy (3 credit hours). 

MINOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

Students who take a Minor in Religious Studies are required to complete with a grade of C or better fifteen hours of courses in selected fields of religious 
studies. In order to ensure a wide study of the field, students are required to select at least one course in Western religious traditions and at least one course 
in non-Westem religious traditions. REL 101 and REL 102 may not be counted in the minor. 



199 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION www2 ncsu edu/ncsu/chass/ps/ 

Caldwell Hall, Room 211 
Phone: (919)515-2481 

J.H. Svara, Head 

E. O'Sullivan, Director of Public Administralion Graduate Programs 
C. E. Griffin. Director. Master of International Studies 
T. Inlow, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: C.K. Coe. DM. Daley, G.D. Garson, M.S. Soroos, J.H. Svara, D.W. Stewart, J.O. W\\\\ami;Professors Emeriti: W.J. Block, A. Holtzman, E.R. 
VMb\n; Associate Professors: S.H. Kessler. J.M. McClain, R.S. Moog, E. O'Sullivan, T.V. Reid, J.E. Swiss, M.L. \3SuAssociate Professors Emeriti: J.H. 
Gilbert, C.E. Griffin, H.G. Kebschull, K.S. Peterson; Assistant Professors: W.A. Boettcher, MA. Dimock, R F. Stephen, A.J. Taylor; Visiting Assistant 
Professors: JR. Homer, S.K. Straus; Lecturers: J.A. Delp, T. Inlow, P M. Pavlik 

The Department of Political Science and Public Administration offers basic and advanced courses in all major fields of the discipline: American government 
and politics (local, state, and national), public law and criminal justice, public administration, comparative politics, international relations and global issues, 
political theory, and methodology of political science. The department affords opportunities for the study of government and administration to students in 
other curricula and schools. 

Graduate courses in political science are available to advanced undergraduates. See listing of graduate degree programs and consult the Graduate Catalog. 

The department provides opportunities for internships with political parties and campaigns, lobbyists, non-profits, and all levels of government, including 
the North Carolina General Assembly Legislative Internship Program. Majors in political science with distinguished academic achievements are annually 
invited to join Zeta Epsilon Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political science honor society. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

There are a number of careers and professions for which a major in political science, or extensive study of government and politics, can be most useful. This 
is true especially for those planning to seek careers in teaching, the legal profession, criminal justice agencies, state and local government, urban planning, 
the federal bureaucracy, journalism or in any of the organizations that seek to monitor political processes or to influence the content of public policy. Private 
firms also seek managers and public affairs specialists who have a knowledge of the fiinctioning of the political system and of politics in general. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Nine credit hours of specialized coursework designed to challenge academically talented majors and allow them to realize their greatest potential as political 
science students. Required for admission to the program: 3.250 GPA both overall and in the major, completion of 9 hours of PS coursework, and completion 
ofeitherPS371 or PS 471. 

Majors admitted to the program complete a substantial research project in consultation with faculty honors advisor (6 credit hours). Also required: either one 
500-level PS course or an honors-option 400-level political science course (3 credit hours). Successful completion of the program is noted on the student's 
transcript, diploma, and at commencement. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Major requirements are 30 hours of political science course work; grades of C- or better for courses applied towards the major with a minimum GPA of 
2.000 for all political science courses taken; 21 hours at the 300-level or above, including two 400-level courses, one of which must be a seminar; PS 201; 
and at least six hours in each of three pairs of subfields (Pair A: American Politics/Public Policy and Administration, Pair B: International or Comparative 
Politics, PairC: Political Theory/Social Science Methods). 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE OPTION 

The department offers a Criminal Justice Option for students interested in the nature and causes of crime as well as the processes of making and 
implementing criminal justice policy. The option includes coursework in both sociology and political science. Students fulfill the normal requirements for 
the College and the major, but choose 28 hours from a prescribed group of public law and criminal justice courses. The option also includes a fieldwork 
component, which allows students to work in a criminal justice agency in the senior year. The program is suitable for those interested in a management or 
policy-making position in police, court, correctional, or probation and parole agencies. 

LAW AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY CONCENTRATION 

The Concentration in Law and Political Philosophy is an interdisciplinary program designed for students who are interested in the theoretical and legal 
dimensions of political life. It seeks to develop a broad understanding of the relationship between law and politics and the moral and philosophical questions 
which are central to both. The concentration is fijlfilled by successful completion of 12 hours of core course requirements, 9 hours of recommended 
electives, and completion of the normal political science major requirements. Six hours of the core course requirements and at least 3 hours of the 
recommended electives will be taken in the Department of Philosophy and Religion. Courses in the concentration provide a humanistic perspective on legal 
and political questions. The program is suitable for those interested in a career in law or government or those who hope to pursue graduate studies in either 
political science or philosophy. 

SOCUL STUDIES TEACHER EDUCATION 

A major in political science may also choose a Teacher Education Option. This is a 124-credit-hour degree program which includes the normal 30-hour 
major plus the required professional education courses. Successful completion of the program leads to certification to teach social studies in the secondary 
schools. Enrollments may be limited in Teacher Education Option programs. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The major requirements for a B.S. degree in political science are identical to the B.A. except that 27 hours of course work in the discipline are required 
instead of 30. 

MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The Minor in Political Science requires 15 hours of political science courses with grades of C- or better and a minimum GPA of 2.000; nine hours must be at 
the 300-level or above, including a 400-level seminar; coursework must be drawn from at least two of the following subfields (Pair A: American 
Politics/Policy and Administration; Pair B: International or Comparative Politics; Pair C: Political Theory/Social Science Methods). 

200 



SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM, DIVISION OF MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES www ncsu edu/chass/socialwork/ 

1911 Building. Room 231 
Phone: (919)515-2492 

L.R. Willliams, Interim Director 
C.E. Waites, Coordinator of Advising 

Associate Professor Emeritus: I.E. Russell; /(iiuMn/ Professors: M.J. Macgowan, C.E. Waites; Lecmrer L.R. Williams; Adjunct Instructors: A. Burch, D. 
Courtney. E. Cummings, P. Denning, M. Deyampert, W. Dubrick, J. Haire, C. Terwilliger. 

The Social Work Program is fiilly accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and offers the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree. Students 
complete a curriculum based on the liberal arts that incorporates a professional foundation, including social work practice, human behavior, diversity, 
community social services, social policy, and research methods. Optional courses offer opportunities to study in depth various social work practice areas 
such as child welfare, health care, black family, and school social work. Students complete several preprofessional placements and a 480-hour field 
placement in a social service setting. A minor in Social Work is available. 

The purpose of the Social Work Program is to prepare students for entry-level professional practice in social work or for advanced graduate-level academic 
work. The curriculum has a liberal arts base which includes English, literature, history, natural science, math, foreign language, philosophy, social sciences, 
physical education and free electives. Thirty-five hours of core social work courses, 3 hours of social work electives, and 3 hours of statistics complete the 
124-hour graduation requirement. Enrollment in practice and field classes is limited to social work majors, and no credit towards the social work degree is 
given for student life experiences. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Social work is an exciting, challenging, and dynamic profession. No matter what the political climate or the changing nature of personal or social need, 
social workers will be in demand. Social workers are employed in a variety of settings which include health care, mental health, services to the aging, child 
welfare, public welfare, substance abuse, public schools, developmental disabilities, and many other public and private settings. 

In each of these areas there is recognition for professional preparation, and the BSW graduate will be prepared to embark upon a career in his or her chosen 
field. All states, including North Carolina, have licensing or certification procedures for social work practice. Graduation from the Social Work Program 
makes the student eligible for such licensing or certification. 

MINOR IN SOCIAL WORK 

The minor is designed to familiarize students with the social service system, major social welfare programs, and elements of the profession of social work. 
The student takes four required courses and selects two additional courses from elective offering which represent the contribution of professional social work 
in a number of settings. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Social Work .Association (SSWA) is open to all social work majors and provides an opportunity for students to socialize and become involved in 

the professional community outside the school through a wide variety of campus and community activities and aids in maintaining a sense of unity and 

purpose among the students. 

Student Association of Black Social Workers (SABSW) provides students with peer support, a chance to socialize with other social work majors, to 

process educational material, and examine how the curticulum fits the needs of African American social work majors and social work agencies in the 

community. 

Phi .4lpha Honor Society is a national honor society for social work students. A student is eligible for membership after achieving national and local 

chapter requirements which include having sophomore status, achieving a 3.000 overall grade point average and a 3.250 grade point average in required 

social work courses, and completing 9 hours of social work courses. 

Student Organization of Christian Social Workers provides students with the opportunity to glorify God through the profession of social work and to 

learn how, as Christians, to work in the field of social work. The organization promotes the open discussion of potential ethical dilemmas that may arise 

when Christian and secular viewpoints conflict. 

ADMISSION TO THE PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

The social work faculty is committed to helping all entering students evaluate career goals and objectives to ensure that the students meet minimum 
academic standards; have goals and objectives compatible with the major; and know specifically what the profession of social work is in terms of its 
philosophy, value base, and fields of practice. The admissions procedure is intended to strengthen the student's certainty regarding career choice and to 
enhance the student's focus and sense of purpose in curriculum planning. Specific components of the admissions procedure include: completion, with a grade 
of C or better, of any 200-level social work course; participation in an orientation session; completion of the application for admission; a personal interview 
may be scheduled with a faculty advisory committee. The program is committed to assuring that adequate resources and support services are available to 
meet the educational needs of students; therefore, admission decisions will be made twice a year on a space-available basis within an established 
faculty:student ratio. The Social Work Program Student Handbook spells out hirther details of this procedure, as well as other elements of the Social Work 
Program. 

CURRICULUM IN SOCIAL WORK 
Degree earned: Bachelor of Social Work 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

SW 201 Community Social Services 3 SW 290 Devel. of Soc. Welfare and Soc.Work 3 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric 3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Rhetoric 3 

FL_201 Foreign Language' 3 History' 3 

Mathematics 3 Math.' 3 

S0C2_' 3 Philosophy' 3 

Any 100-levelPE in Fiuiess& Wellness^ 1 Physical Education Elective I 

16 16 



201 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

SW 410 Multicultural Social Work or 

SOC 305 Race and Enthnic Relations 

Natural Science' 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psychology 

Literature' 



Fall Semester 

Social Work Elective 

ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 

History 

Natural Science' 

Sci., Technology & Soc.'° 

Free Elective 



Fall Semester 

♦SW 405 Social Work Practice II* 

SW 420 Legal Aspects of Social Work* 

•SW 480 Preparation for Fieldwork'' 

Free Elective 

Free Elective 

Free Elective 



Spring Semester 

SW 307 Social Welfare Programs and Policy 



Credits 
3 



3 SW 3 1 Human Behavior for Social Work 

4 Literature* 

3 Natural Science' 
3 PS/EC 2 ' 
3 
16 


3 
3 
4 
3 
16 


JUNIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 

3 ♦SW 320 Social Work Practice I 

3 SW 300 Social Work Research Methods or 

3 SOC 300 Research Methods 

3 ANT or SOC 3_/4_ ' 

3 Free Elective 

2 Free Elective 

17 


Credits 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
15/16 


SENIOR YEAR 




Credits Spring Semester 

3 'SW 490 Field Work in Social Services 

3 

1 

3 

3 

3 

16 


Credits 
12 


12 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 



124 



•Practice and Field Courses must be taken in successive semesters. Field Work is offered in both Fall and Spring semesters, but must be taken during the 

last semester. Preparation for Field Work is a corequisite of SW 405 Social Work Practice II. 

'Demonstrated proficiency at the first-semester intermediate level (FL_ 201) in a foreign language. In order to enroll at the 201 level, prerequisites must be 

met through course work or the Placement Test, 

^Any 100 level PE Fitness & Wellness course and one additional 1 credit PE course is required for graduation. 

'The fifteen-hour social science requirement of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences includes ANT 252; one 200-level SOC course; one 300-or 

400-level ANT or SOC course; PSY 200 and a basic course in political science or economics. 

*The Bachelor of Social Work consists of 46 hours in the major including the twelve hours of fieldwork (SW 490). Practice and Field Work courses must be 

taken in successive semesters. SW 490 is scheduled in both fall and spring semesters but must be taken during the student's last semester. 

'Two mathematics courses (6 hours credit) are required. 

'This two-semester requirement includes a course concerned with pre-industrial Western or non-Western societies (HI 207, 208, 209, 215, 216, 263, 264, 

270, 275, or 276), and another dealing with the United States or post-industrial Western societies (HI 205, 210, 221, 222, 233, 251, or 252). 

'Three hours of philosophy, exclusive of logic (LOG 201 and 335), are required. 

'This requirement consists of two literature courses, at least one of which must be in literature outside the United States and prior to the twentieth century. 

One of the courses must come from the following: ENG/FL 221, ENG/FL 222; ENG 251», ENG 261», ENG 262*; FLF 301; FLS 301; FLS 303; FLG 316; 

or FLR 303. The second course may also come from the list above or it may be a course in American or twentieth century literature (either ENG/FL 223, 

ENG/FL 224; ENG 246, ENG 248, ENG 252. ENG 265, ENG 266; or FLR 304), or it may be an upper-division survey course or literature course in a 

period, genre or major figure in English, a foreign language in English translation, or the original foreign language (either ENG 305, 349, 362, 363, 369, 370, 

371, 372, 373, 376, 377, 380, 382, 383, 385, 390, 398, 399, 420, 439, 448, 449, 451, 452, 453. 462, 463, 464, 465, 468, 469, 470, 471, 486, 487; ENG/FL 

394, 406, 407; FLF 302, 320, 323, 324, 330, 352, 414, 415, 492; FLG 323; FLS 302, 304, 323, 403, 404. 492; or GRK 320). 'Students using ENG 261 or 

ENG 262 to satisfy this requirement may not also use ENG 251. •Students using ENG 261 or 262 to satisfy this requirement may not also use ENG 251. 

'The natural science requirement calls for a minimum of eleven credit hours; at least one human-oriented science is required - preferably BIO 105, 125, 181, 

183 or ZO 212; students must receive credit from two different basic introductory courses in physics, chemistry, the earth sciences, and the biological 

sciences; the third course may be either GN 301 or FS/NTR 301 ; at least two courses must include a laboratory experience. 

'"One three-credit course taken from the university approved lists of courses in Science, Technology and Society (Humanities and Social Sciences 

Perspectives list or Science and Technology Perspectives list). The course used to meet this requirement may not be used to fijifill any other requirement. 



http://sasw.chass.ncsu.edu/s&a/s&ahmpg.htm 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

1911 Building, Room 301 
Phone: (919)515-3180 

W.B. Clifford, Head 

E.M. Woodrum, Associate Head 

R.S. Ellovich, Undergraduate Administrator 

J.C. Leiter, Director of Graduate Programs 

S.C. Lilley. Department Extension Leader 

Sociology Teaching, Research And Extension Faculty 

Professors: V.M. Aldige, W.B. Clifford, L.R. Delia Fave, T.J. Hoban, J.C. Leiter, R.L. Moxley, LB. Otto, B.J. Risman. MM. Sawhney, M.D. Schulman, 
D.T. Tomaskovic-Devey, R.C. Wimberley, EM. Woodrum, M.T. Zingraff; Professors Emeriti: J.N. Collins, EM. Crawford, T.N. Hobgood Jr., C.P. Marsh, 
ME. Voland, J.N. Young; Associate Professors: MP. Atkinson, R.F. Czaja, S.K. Garber, T.N. Greenstein, S.C. Lilley, PL. McCall, ML. Schwalbe, M.E. 



202 



Thomas, M.S. Thompson, R.J. Thomson, K.M. Troost, C.R. Zimmer; Associate Professors Emeriti: R.C. Brisson, P.P. Thompson; Assistant Professors: 
R.L. Engen, W.R. Smith; Assistant Professors Emeriti: C.G. Dawson, T.M. Hyman; Associate Member of the Faculty: R.D. Mustian (Agricultural and 
Extension Education); Adjunct Associate Professor: JR. Thigpen (East Carolina University'). 

Anthropology Teaching And Research Faculty 

Associate Professors: I. Rovner. A.L. Schiller, M.L. Walek, J.M. Wallace; Associate Professors Emeriti: G.S. Nickerson. J.G. Peck; Assistant Professors: 
R.S. Ellovich. 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers introductory and advanced courses in sociology and anthropology covering the major sub-fields of 
the two disciplines. It also offers supervised field work and practicum experiences required for certain curricula in the department. 

Aims of the departmental offerings are to provide majors with academic background and experience useful for many careers in government and industry or 
for pursuing advanced academic work (for a description of the graduate degrees offered by the department, see the Graduate Catalog) and to provide service 
courses to other students. 

The department, jointly administered by the Colleges of Humanities and Social Sciences and Agriculture and Life Sciences, offers six undergraduate 
curricula. The four curricula administered by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences are Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, Bachelor of Arts in 
Sociology with Criminal Justice Option, Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with Social Studies Teacher Education Option, and Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 
with Anthropology Concentration. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

In this program, outstanding majors pursue an individual program of study involving close working relations with departmental faculty. Twelve credit hours 
of honors courses will allow students to enhance their expertise in sociology and anthropology. Honors courses combine nine hours of credit in regular and 
independent study classes with a three-credit honors thesis done in consultation with a faculty honors advisor 

To be admitted, students must have earned 12 hours in their major and have a 3.250 overall GPA and a 3.250 in the major. To graduate with 
Sociology/Anthropology Honors, the student must have a 3.250 GPA overall and in the major. Successful completion of the program is noted on the 
student's transcript and diploma and at commencement. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

The following departmental requirements must be met by all students majoring in sociology: A minimum of 31 hours in the major field including SOC 300, 
Social Research Methods; SOC 400, Theories of Social Structure; SOC 401, Theories of Social Interaction; at least three but no more than six credit hours of 
200-level sociology courses; at least 15 credit hours of 400-level or above sociology courses including SOC 400 and SOC 401. (Note: In the LCS program 
[anthropology concentration], 3 credit hours at the 400-level or above are in anthropology.) Additional electives in sociology may be at the 300-level or 
above. ANT 252, Cultural Anthropology, is required. A second course in anthropology is strongly recommended. ST 31 1, Introduction to Statistics, is also 
required. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE OPTION 

The Criminal Justice Option seeks to develop a professional orientation that will be relevant both to occupational goals and participation as a citizen in 
community affairs. Courses in both political science and sociology are included in a 25-block that provides general background in crime specific courses 
dealing with deviance, juvenile delinquency, the court system, correctional facilities, and the like, including field placement in an agency of criminal justice 
system. 

SOCL\L STUDIES TEACHER EDUCATION OPTION 

This curriculum prepares the student for state certification in social studies in the secondary school system. (125 hours required for graduation). The 
inclusion of a professional semester with practice teaching and the need for a broad base in the social sciences makes this a comparatively demanding 
program. Courses in education and psychology are taken beginning in the sophomore year in preparation for the teaching experience. The student learns the 
basic concepts of economics, political science, anthropology and history, as well as sociology. Enrollments in Teacher Education Option programs may be 
limited. 

ANTHROPOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

This concentration emphasizes the complementary nature of sociology and anthropology in understanding human behavior in social and cultural context. It 
encourages flexibility in selection from both anthropology (12 hours within the major plus 6 hours in the social science requirement) and sociology (22 
hours) courses. The four anthropological subdisciplines of cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics are represented in the 
course offerings. 

MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

A minor in Anthropology focuses on the comparative study of human beings, with emphasis on biology and behavior A flexible selection of courses (15 
credit hours) includes offerings from anthropological subdisciplines of cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics. 

MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY 

This minor emphasizes sociological theory and research with substantive applications. The minor builds on theory and methodology and allows students 
flexibility in the choice of specialties such as criminology, stratification, race and ethnic relations, agriculture, development, work and organization, or the 
family. 



203 



COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT 



: 



112 Nelson Hall Phone: (919)515-5565 

NCSU Box 8614 Fax: (919)515-5564 

Raleigh. NC 27695-8614 E-mail: management@ncsu.edu 

Homepage: http://www. ncsu. edu/COM 



J. W. Bartley. Interim Dean 

G, J. Zuckerman, Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 

J. M. Busko, Coordinator of Career Services 

E. O. Dixon, Director of Admissions 

0. A. Hankins, Director of Academic Affairs 

A. L. Irby, Director of Advising 

A. F. Nowel, Director of Student Services 

D. R. Steen, Director of Computing Services 

MISSION 

The mission of tlie College of Management is to provide the citizens of North Carolina high quality education in accounting, business management and 
economics; to produce distinguished research and publications; and to provide high quality executive education and outreach programs. The College's 
undergraduate and graduate degree programs are the core of its mission and are distinguished by their excellence and their emphasis on the management of 
technology and those aspects of management that interface with the other technical and professional disciplines at North Carolina State University. 

VISION 

The College of Management will be recognized for excellence in management education, for its emphasis on the management of technology and for its 
unique dual-degree and cross-disciplinary programs with other colleges at North Carolina State University. 

The College of Management offers a variety of curricula that prepare graduates to become leaders in a global business environment. Students may prepare 
for careers in fields such as accounting, electronic commerce, fmancial management, manufacturing management, marketing, sales, economic analysis, 
human resource management quality management, management information systems, and general management. Opportunities for employment include 
corporations, consulting and public accounting firms, government agencies, and non-profit organizations. Many graduates pursue advanced studies in law, 
professional accounting, economics and business administration. 

The curricula provide all students with a broad liberal arts background combined with a strong concentration in accounting, business, and economics. 
Communication skills and computer usage are stressed throughout the course work. The College faculty are dedicated to excellence in teaching and research. 
An outstanding faculty combined with innovative curricula provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic knowledge and management skills 
necessary to become leaders in the business world. Many courses are offered in the evening as well as the day and provide part-time educational 
opportunities to employed adults. 

The three departments in the College, Accounting, Business Management, and Economics, graduate more than 500 students annually. Four undergraduate 
degree programs are offered: B.S. in Accounting, B.S. in Business Management, and B.A. and B.S. in Economics. The accounting and business management 
degrees are professionally oriented while the economics degrees are both liberal arts degrees. New freshmen and transfer students with fewer than 40 hours 
of college credit may enter an Undeclared Major in the College. After completing 40 credit hours, students in the Undeclared major enter a degree program. 
Graduate degrees offered include: Master of Accounting, Master of Economics, Master of Science in Management, and Ph.D. in Economics. 

The Alexander Hamilton Scholars Program is a dual degree program sponsored jointly by the College of Management and the College of Humanities and 
Social Sciences at North Carolina State University. The program is designed for undergraduate students wishing to complement a management degree with 
a strong emphasis on international studies. For further information, contact Dr. John Dutton, program Co-Director, at 5 1 5-6948. 

Students may pursue a dual degree program in which they receive both a B.S. in Chemical or Electrical Engineering and M.S. in Management. For further 
information contact the College of Engineering. 

ACADEMIC MINORS: 

Academic minors for students in other majors are offered in accounting, business management, and economics. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

There are two honor societies: Sigma Beta Delta for accounting and business management majors and Omicron Delta Epsilon for economics majors. 
Students also have the opportunity to join many management related organizations including the Accounting Society, Alpha Kappa Psi (professional 
business fraternity), American Advertising Federation, College of Management Advisory Board, Economics Society, Entrepreneur's Club, National 
Association of Black Accountants, Pre-Law Student Association, Society for African-American Corporate Leaders, and the Society for Human Resource 
Management. These organizations sponsor social events and hold regular meetings where business leaders discuss current issues and provide career advice. 

FACILITIES 

The College of Management is located in Nelson Hall. A large computing lab in Nelson Hall provides students access to multimedia personal computers 
served by a local area network and linked to the Internet. All of the College's primary classrooms are equipped for multimedia presentations. 

STUDENT SERVICES 

The College of Management provides comprehensive academic advising services to undergraduate students. New freshmen and off-campus transfer students 
are assigned to specialized advisors. All students have access to a faculty advisor and to the College's professional advising staff located in the Academic 
Affairs Office, Nelson Hall. 

204 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

In addition to university-wide awards, the College has the following scholarships: the Brantley and Geri Deloatche Scholarship, the EC. Hunt. Jr. 
Endowment, the First Union Undergraduate Scholarship Award, the Lichtin Family Scholarship, the Robert L. Shaw Memorial Scholarship in accounting, 
and R. Ray Moore Scholarship available to rising juniors and seniors majoring in business management and economics. The College contacts 
all applicants for admission who may be eligible for scholarships. 

DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING www mgt ncsu edu 

Nelson Hall 

Phone: (919)515-2256 

C. J. Messere, Head 

R. L. Peace, Director of Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: R.L. Peace: KPMC Peat Marwick Professors: C.J. Messere: Profesors: J.W. Bartley, R.L. Peace, P.P. 
Williams; Associate Professors: B.C. Branson, FA. Buckless, A.Y. Chen, K.A. Krawczyk, R. B. Sawyers, L.M. Wright, G.J. Zuckerman: Assistant 
Professors: M. S. Beasley, B.A. Chaney. L.R. Ingraham, JO. Jenkins, D. P. Pagach; Lecturers: E. R. Carraway, J. W. Giles, H. O. Griffin, W. A. Koole, G. 
A. Marsh. 

The accounting program provides education and training to individuals who will pursue careers as professional accountants in business, government, and 
industr>'. The Department of Accounting currently offers a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting. In order to meet the demands of employment markets 
for more highly skilled accounting professionals and respond to the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants' mandated 1 50-hour education 
requirement by the year 2000, the Department of Accounting also offers a fifth-year Masters of Accounting (MAC) degree program. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Accounting systems and the accountants who maintain them are absolutely essential to the functioning of business enterprises of all types and sizes, to 
government at all levels; and to nonprofit organizations. Many career opportunities are available to accounting graduates. Starting salaries are among the 
highest of all university graduates, and potential earnings over a lifetime are excellent. 

The accounting profession is organized into three major employment groups: 

• approximately 60 percent of accountants are employed in business entities; 

• another 1 percent work in non-business entities; 

• about 30 percent are in public practice. 

Public accountants offer auditing, tax preparation and planning, and management consulting to individuals, businesses, and other organizations on a fee 
basis. Management or industrial accountants design financial and cost accounting systems and provide their companies with financial management, financial 
analysis, planning and budgeting, product costing, and operational auditing. Governmental units and other not-for-profit entities have informational needs 
similar to private businesses. Accountants employed by such entities perform many of the same functions. Accountants in some governmental agencies, such 
as the SEC, IRS, and FBI. serve the dual ftjnction of auditing and law enforcement.Certified public accountants (CPAs), certified management accountants 
(CMAs), certified internal auditors (CIAs) and certified cost analysts (CCAs) are individuals who, like doctors, dentist, and lawyers, are licensed to practice 
their profession. Such certifications are granted to those accountants who pass a qualifying examination and meet certain accounting experience and 
educational requirements. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Approximately ten achievement awards sponsored by businesses and public accounting firms are made to outstanding students annually. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Designed for academically talented and highly motivated students seeking a richer educational experience. Students can expand their understanding of 

accounting's role in society and investigate accounting problems and issues in greater depth. The instructional environment gives students opportunities to 

develop critical thinking, problem-solving and communication skills. Students will be better prepared for entry into graduate programs and employment 

possibilities. 

Admission Requirements: 

Completion of 30 hours of course work at NC State with at least a 3.250 overall GPA. 

Graduation Requirements for Honors: 

Students must achieve at least a 3.250 overall GPA and at least a 3.250 GPA in all honors courses completed. 

Honors Coursework: 

• 12 credit hours of honors course work minimum required. The 12 hours of honors course work must contain courses from at least two of the 
following categories: Special courses, advanced courses and independent study. 

• In their senior year, all honors students must take either a regularly scheduled honors section of ACC 490 or a student-initiated honors option in 
ACC 490. ACC 490 will include a major project and/or a small group tutorial that meets the Honors Program requirement for "independent 
study." 

Remaining 9 hours credit must be selected from among the following categories: 

1 . Honors sections of any 300- or 400-level ACC courses 

2. Student or faculty initiated honors options in any 300- or 400-level ACC course 

3. Honors credit through honors section, student initiated honors option, or faculty initiated honors option in any EC or BUS course (no more than 3 credit 
hours from EC or BUS courses may count towards the remaining 9 credit hours.) 

4. Advanced courses: 500-level MAC courses taken as elective courses or as substitutes for 300- or 400-level courses, subject to approval by the Honors 
Program Director. 

CIRRICULU.M AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

All Accounting majors graduating after Summer II 1997 are subject to a departmental residency requirement that they complete a minimum of 30 credit 
hours of course work at NC State after being formally admitted to the B S degree program in Accounting (or the B.S. in Business Management). In addition. 
Accounting majors must complete at least 30 hours of major courses and at least six of the following courses in residency atNC State: ACC 310, 51 1, 320. 
330, 410, 450. and 490. A "General Policies" statement for all College of Management majors is available in Nelson Hall It serves as an addendum to the 
curriculum requirements and describes GPA requirements for graduation, residency requirements, suspension policy, required grades in specific courses, 
course repeat policy, etc 

205 



CURRICULUM IN ACCOUNTING 
Degree earned: B.S. in Accounting 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ACC 100 Intro. Accounting Profession 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus^ 

History Elective' 

Natural Science Elective' 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness'^ 



Credits Spring Semester 

1 COM 1 1 Public Speaking or 

3 COM 146 Business Comm. 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading' 

3 M 200 Micro. Applic. Bus. Accounting 

4 MA 132 Comp. Math for Life & Mgmt. Sci. 
1 Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective" 

15 Natural Science Elective* 

Physical Education Elective'^ 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ACC 210 Accounting I 

BUS 201 (295B) Intro. Bus. Processes 

EC 201 Prin. of Microecon. 

MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math^ 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psychology 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

ACC 220 Accounting II 

BUS 335 Organizational Behavior 

BUS/ST 350 Economics/Bus. Stat.' 

EC 202 Prin. of Macroecon. 

Ethics Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ACC 310 Intermediate Financial Account' 

ACC 320 Managerial Uses of Cost' 

BUS 370 Operations Mgmt. 

ENG 33x* Advanced Writing Elective 

Restricted Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ACC 300 The Accounting Profession' 

3 ACC 31 1 Intermed. Fin. Accounting II' 

3 ACC 330 Intro, to Income Tax' 

3 BUS/CSC 340 Info. Systems Mgmt. 

3 Sci., Technology, and Soc. Elective'' 

15 Restricted Elective'" 



Credits 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15-16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ACC 410 Government & Special Repot Issues 

ACC 440 Accounting Information Systems' 

BUS 320 Financial Mgmt. 

BUS 360 Marketing Methods 

Literature Elective' 



Is Spring Semester 

3 ACC 300 The Accounting Profession' 

3 ACC 407 Business Law 

3 ACC 450 Auditing Fin. Info.' 

3 ACC 490 Senior Seminar 

3 College of Mgmt. Elective" 

15 Restricted Elective'" 



Credits 
I 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15-16 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 122 

'"Cs" or better in both ENG 1 1 1 and 1 12 (or ENG 1 12-H) are required. 

^MA 131 and 132 or 141 may substitute for MA 121. MA 242 may substitute for MA 1 14. 

'One course from among the History, Literature, and H & SS electives must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'Three courses (11 hours) from natural sciences; 8 hours of Basic Natural Science and 3 hours from the Science, Technology, and Society (STS) elective list. 

'ST 361, or 372 may substitute for BUS 350. 

'One of the following courses in ethics: PHI 275, 31 1, 313, 314, 321, or 322. (PHI 31 1, 313, and 322 have prerequisite.) 

'COURSES REQUIRING C- PREREQUISITES: 

Course Prerequisites 

ACC 3 1 C- or better in ACC 2 1 

ACC 3 1 1 C- or better in ACC 3 1 

ACC 320 C- or better in ACC 220 

ACC 330 C- or better in ACC 210 

ACC 4 1 C- or better in ACC 3 1 

ACC 440 C- or better in ACC 3 10, and ACC 320 

ACC 450 C- or better in ACC 3 1 1 

'ADVANCED WRITING ELECTIVE - Select one of the following: ENG 331 Communication for Engineering and Technology, ENG 332 Communication 

for Business Mgmt, or ENG 333 Communication for Science and Research 

'Prospective MAC candidates should enroll in ACC 300 during the spring semester of their Senior year. Those students not planning to enroll in the MAC 

program should take ACC 300 during the spring semester of their Junior year. 

'"Nine hours of restricted electives are required. These electives may not be ACC or BUS courses. One of the three courses may be EC. Credit will not be 

allowed for FL 1 1 , 1 02, or 1 05 (in language in which proficiency requirement is met), and MA 101, 1 03, 1 05, 1 07, 1 08 and 111. 

"This course must be in a 400-leveI BUS or ACC course or a graduate-level ACC course taken for undergraduate credit. 

'^ PEC, PEF, PEH, PEO and PES courses cannot be taken to satisfy this requirement. PE courses may be taken for credit only. 

MINOR 

The accounting minor is offered to students interested in gaining a basic knowledge of accounting and an understanding of how accounting information is 
used to make rational decisions by individuals, businesses, and society. The minor requires 15 hours of accounting courses and includes an introduction to 
financial, managerial, and tax accounting principles and practices. The minor is not intended to prepare students for a professional accounting career. Please 
contact the Academic Affairs office in Nelson for specific information about admission and other requirements. 

206 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT www mgt ncsu edu 

Nelson Hall 

Phone: (919)515-5567 

S. Barr, Department Head 

S. G. Allen, Director of Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: J. P. Huggard. C.B. Kimbrough, J.W. ^\\%onProfessors: S.G. Allen. S.Barr, R.L. Clark. G. W. Dickson, 
C.P. Jones. R.J. Lewis, MA. Rappa, J.W. \^\\io\\. Professors Emeriti: A.J. Bartley. DR. D\\on\ Associate Professors: D.L. Baumer, C.C. Bozaith. S.N. 
Chapman, K.S. Davis, J.C. Dutton, S.K. Markham, E.A. McDermed, K. Mitchell, P. Mulvey, A. Padilla, J.C. Poindexter, }i.;Assislant Professors: L. 
Aiman-Smith, J.B. Earp, J.K. McCreery, M. Montoya-Weiss, F.C. Payton, K.D. Schenk, S.E. Scullen, B.B. Tyler, G. Voss, G. YoungMcturers: J.P. 
Huggard, J.P. Jeck, C.B. Kimbrough. Associate Members of the Faculty: A. Kingon, ME. Kurz, M. Zapata. 

The Department of Business Management offers a Bachelor of Science degree in business management that prepares students for careers in business, 
government or nonprofit organizations and for graduate study in business, law. and related fields. The curriculum offers a broad professional education in a 
variety of business fields such as finance, human resources, marketing, management information systems, and operations/production management. Career 
opportunities are available in areas such as retailing, banking and financial services, high tech manufacturing, transportation, consulting, and government 
agencies. 

The Bachelor of Science degree in business management consists of a broad foundation of humanities, social science, science and mathematics; a 
comprehensive business core; and a concentration in a functional business area. The program emphasizes management in a highly competitive global 
economy. Students develop strong communication skills and learn to work in teams. Many courses prepare students to use information technology and 
computers. Required courses in the major include accounting, economics, communications, business writing, legal environment of business, computer 
science, finance, marketing, organizational behavior, quantitative methods, operations management, and business strategy. Business management students 
also complete a three-course business concentration. 

CURRICULUM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

All Business Management majors graduating after Summer II 1997 are subject to a departmental residency requirement that they complete a minimum of 30 
credit hours of course work at NC State after being formally admitted to the B. S. degree program in Business Management (or the B S. in Accounting). In 
addition. Business Management majors must complete at least 30 credit hours of the major course requirements of the degree while in residency at NC State. 
A "General Policies" statement for all College of Management majors is available in Nelson Hall. It serves as an addendum to the curriculum requirements 
and describes GPA requirements for graduation, residency requirements, suspension policy, required grades in specific courses, course repeat policy, etc. 



CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 
Degree earned: B.S. in Business Management 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BUS 100 Intro, to COM 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus'* 

History Elective^ 

Natural Science Elective' 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness" 



Credits 
1 

3 
3 
3 
4 
1 



Spring Semester 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading' 

M 200 Micro. App. Bus. Accounting 

MA 132 Comp Math for Life & Mgmt. Sci. 

Natural Science' 

Communication' 

Free Elective'" 

Physical Education Elective'^ 



Credits 
3 
1 
1 
4 
3 
3 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ACC 210 Accounting I 

BUS 201 (295B) Intro. Bus. Processes 

EC 201 Prin. of Microeconomics 

MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psychology 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



Spring Semester 

ACC 220 Accounting II 

BUS/ST 350 Economics./Bus. Stat.' 

EC 202 Prin. of Macroeconomics 

FL_I02 Inter. Foreign Language 

Humanities/Soc.Sci. Elective 



Credits 
I 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BUS 305 Legal & Regulatory Environm. 

BUS 320 Financial Mgmt. 

ENG 33x" Advanced Writing Elective 

Natural Science' 

Ethics Elective' 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

BUS 330 Human Resource Mgmt. 
BUS 335 Organizational Behavior 
BUS/CSC 340 Info. Systems Mgmt. 
BUS 360 Marketing Methods 
BUS 370 Operations Mgmt. 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
IS 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
Business Concentration 
Humanities/Social Science Elective ' 
Literature Elective' 
Free Electives'" 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
6 
IS 



Spring Semester 

BUS 480 Business Policy & Strategy 

Business Concentration 

Free Electives"* 



Credits 
3 
6 
5 
14 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 120 



207 



'A grade of "C" or better is required. 

^Students should select from among the History Electives list. 

'Select one of the following: COM 1 1 0. 1 1 2, 146, 2 11 . 

*MA 131 and 132 or 141 may substitute for MA 121, MA 242 may substitute for MA 1 14 

'students should select from the Natural Science (Basic) List (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, and Physics). 

'Students should select from the following: PHI 275, 31 1, 313, 314, 321, and 322. (PHI 31 1, 313 and 322 have a prerequisite). 

'Students should select from the Natural Sciences Elective List, including, but not limited to. Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, and Physics. 

'One HSS course must be from the Science, Technology, and Society (Humanities and Social Science Perspective) List and the other course can be from the 

aforementioned list or the Humanitites and Social Sciences Additional List. 

'Students should select from among the Literature Electives List. 

'"Credit will not be allowed for FL 101, 102, or 105 (in the language in which proficiency requirement is met), and MA 101, 103, 105, 107, 108, and 111. 

' 'ADVANCED WRITING ELECTIVE - Select one of the following: ENG 33 1 Communication for Engineering and Technology, ENG 332, 

Communication for Business Management, or ENG 333 Communication for Science and Research. 

" PEC, PEP, PEH, PEO and PES courses cannot be taken to satisfy this requirement. PE courses may be taken for credit only. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Open to academically talented and highly motivated students seeking a more thorough preparation for future careers in businessStudents are exposed to a 

richer set of business problems taught in smaller classes by distinguished faculty. Opportunities are provided for students to develop critical thinking, 

problem solving and communication skills. Students will be better prepared for entry into graduate programs and attractive employment possibilities. 

Admission Requirements: 

Completion of 30 hours of course work at NC State with at least a 3.250 overall GPA. 

Graduation Requirements for Honors: 

Completion of 12 credit hours of honors coursework and achievement of at least a 3.25 overall GPA and at least a 3.25 GPA in all honors courses completed. 

Honors Coursework: 

• 12 Credit hours minimum of honors work is required. The 12 hours of honors course work must contain courses from at least two of the following 
categories: Special courses, advanced courses and independent study. 

• In their senior year, all honors students must take either a regularly scheduled honors section of BUS 480, Business Policy and Strategy or a 
faculty initiated Honors option in BUS 480. The honors BUS 480 will include a major project and /or a small group tutorial that meets the 
Honors Program requirement for "independent study." 

9 credit hours of honors course work must be selected from the following categories: 

1 . Honors sections of 300- or 400-level BUS courses (special courses). 

2. Faculty initiated honors options in 400-level BUS concentration courses (special courses). 

3. Subject to approval of the Honors Program Director, 500-level MSM (daytime) courses taken as substitutes for required courses or as electives (advanced 
courses). 

4. Maximum of one honors section (3 credit hours) in any 300- or 400-level ACC or EC course (special course). 

MINOR IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

The Department of Business Management offers a minor in Business Management to undergraduates other than those majoring in the B.S. degree in 
Accounting (ACC). Students majoring in Textile and Apparel Management (TXT) or Agricultural Business Management (ABM) must meet the standard 
course requirements for the Business Management Minor including at least three courses (9 credit hours) that are not required courses for their major (or part 
of a list of alternative courses that meet a major requirement). 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS www mgt ncsu edu 

328 Nelson Hall 
Phone: (919)515-3274 

S.E. Margolis, Head 

W. N. Thurman, Director of Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: J.S. Lapp, M. B. McElroy; Professors: S. G. Allen, R. L. Clark, E. W. Erickson, D. Fisher, D. J. Flath, T. J. 
Grennes, A. R. Hall, D. M. Holthausen, D. N. Hyman, C. R. Knoeber, S. E. Margolis, R. B. Palmquist, D. K. Pearce, J. J. Seater, W. N. Thurman, W.J. 
Wessels; Adjunct Professor: J. B. Hunt, Jr.; Professors Emeriti: R. M. Feam, B. M. Olsen, C. B. Turner; Associate Professors: D. S. Ball, L. A. Craig, A. E. 
Headen, J. S. Lapp, M. B. McElroy, C. M. Newmark; Assistant Professors: A. P. Levy, T. C. Tsoulouhas; Associate Member of the Faculty: D. A. Dickey 
(Statistics). 

The Department of Economics offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in economics. An undergraduate program in economics prepares a 
student for a career in business or government as well as for graduate and professional schools. Economics students can develop their understanding of 
economic issues in a variety of areas, including financial institutions, international trade and finance, labor and industrial relations, health care economics, 
industrial organization, environmental and natural resource economics, public finance, and economic history. An economics degree is attractive to employers 
because it provides a rigorous analytical training with a broad understanding of the workings of the economic system. Its flexibility also allows students to 
tailor their education to specific interests and career goals. An undergraduate degree in economics has long served as the foundation for advanced 
professional degrees in business and law, as well as for graduate study in economics. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The Honors Program in Economics is designed for academically talented and motivated students who desire a richer educational experience than offered in 
regular courses. The primary goal of this program is to help students develop the ability to apply economic analysis to issues involving choice at the 
individual, household, firm and government level. Admission to the program requires junior standing, completion of a least 30 hours at NC State with a 
3.000 GPA, and grades of B or better in EC 201, 301, and 302. To graduate with honors in economics, a student must have at least a 3.250 overall GPA and 
3.250 or better in all economics courses taken at NC State. In addition, the student must take the Honors Seminar (EC 490H) and the honors section of at 
least two of the following courses: EC 201, EC 301, EC 302 or a faculty-initiated Honors Option EC course. 

CURRICULA 

The Bachelor of Arts in economics is a broad and flexible program of study The major course work for the Bachelor of Arts in economics includes 12 
semester hours of economic theory and 14 hours of mathematics, statistics, and computer science. In addition, students study at least 1 8 semester hours of 

208 



advanced, applied economics. The program provides for substantial flexibility so that students, in consultation with their faculty advisors, may tailor their 
studies to their particular interests and long term objectives. 

The Bachelor of Science in economics puts particular emphasis on training in analytical methods in economics. It differs from the Bachelor of Arts by 
having less emphasis on the liberal arts and greater emphasis on courses in mathematics, science, and statistics. A "General Policies" statement for all 
College of Management majors is available in Nelson Hall. It serves as an addendum to the curriculum requirements and describes GPA requirements for 
graduation, residency requirements, suspension policy, required grades in specific courses, course repeat policy, etc. 

CURRICULUM IN ECONOMICS 
Degree earned: B.A. in Economics 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus^ 

FL_201 Inter Foreign Language' 

Natural Science'' 

M 200 Micro. Applic. BUS Accounting 

Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading' 

3 MA 132 Comp. Math for Life & Mgt. 

3 MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math.' 

4 History' 

1 Natural Science' 

1 Physical Education Elective" 
15 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
3 
4 
1 
15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CSC 200 Introduction to Computers 

EC 201 Prin. of Microeconomics or 

EC 205 Fundamentals of Econ 

History' 

Literature' 

Social Science*" 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

EC 202 Prin. of Macroeconomics 

Phil., Relig.. Vis/Perf. Arts Elective' 

Literature' 

Natural Science'' 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

BUS/ST 350 Economics Bus. Stat.'" 

EC 301 Intermed. Microeconomics 

Advanced Writing" 

Sci., Technology, and Soc. Elective' 

Social Science" 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



Spring Semester 

EC 302 Intermed. Macroeconomics 

Advanced Comm." 

Advised Elective'^ 

Economics Electives'^ 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
6 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 
EC 490" 

Advised Electives''' 
Economics Elective'' 
Free Elective 



Credits 

3 

6 

3 

3 

15 



Spring Semester 
Advised Electives''' 
Economics Electives'^ 
Free Electives 



Credits 

6 

6 

2 

14 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 120 

'"Cs" or better in both ENG 1 1 1 and 1 12 ( or ENG 1 12-H) are required. 

^MA 131 and 132 or 141 may substitute for MA 121, MA 242 may substitute for MA 114. Students who qualify for MA 131 or 141 are encouraged to take 
one of these courses. 

'Proficiency at the first-semester intermediate level (either through successfiji completion of FL_20 1 or appropriate placement by the Placement Test) in 
French, Spanish, German, Russian. Italian, Latin, Classical Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Japanese, Chinese, Portuguese or Swahili is required, 
^hree courses from the GER Natural Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Physics) list. 
'Two courses from the GER history list. 

'Two courses chosen from the following GER lists: Anthropology, Politics and Government, Psychology. Cultural Geography, and Sociology. 
'Two Courses from the GER Literature list. 

'One course chosen from one of the following GER lists: Philosophy. Religion. Visual and Performing Arts. 
'One course from the Science. Technology and Society (Science and Technology Perspective) list. 
'°ST 361. or 372 may substitute for ST/BUS 350. Credit will not be given for more than one of these courses. 
"Choose from: ENG 331. 332. or 333. Must be taken in JR year. 

'^15 hours of 300 and 400 level EC courses (except EC (ARE) 40 1 ) and 500 level ECG courses. No more than 6 hours of 300 level EC courses may be 
counted as economics electives. 

"a second course chosen from the GER Advanced writing list or a course chosen from the GER Communication/Speech list. 

'''15 hours chosen from any university course offerings except FL 101. 102, or 105 (in which proficiency requirement is met), or MA lOI, 103, 105, 107, 
108, or 1 1 1, or PE/PEH courses. Students are urged to discuss these courses with their adviser and to consider using these electives to pursue a minor. 
(NOTE: Certain courses may not be taken in combination with other courses of similar content. SEE CATALOG FOR RESTRICTIONS.) 
"EC 490H or EC 498 may substitute for EC 490. Students who write a term paper in another EC or ECG course during their senior year may petition to 
substitute another economics elective for EC 490. 

" PEC, PEF, PEH, PEO and PES courses cannot be taken to satisfy this requirement. PE courses may be taken for credit only. 

209 



CURRICULUM IN ECONOMICS 

Degree earned: B.S. in Economics 



Fall Semester 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. & Rhetoric' 

History'' 

Math' 

Natural Science' 

M 200 Micro. Applic. Bus. Acctg 

Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness 



Fall Semester 

EC 201 Prin. of Microeconomics or 

EC 205 Fundamentals of Econ. 

Literature' 

Math' 

Natural Science' 

Free Elective 



Fall Semester 

BUS/ST 350 Economics Bus. Stat.' 

EC 301 Intermed. Microeconomics 

Advanced Writing' 

Natural Science' 

Social Science^ 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Credits 
3 
3 

3/4 

4 

1 

1 

15/16 



Spring Semester 

ENG 1 12 Comp. & Reading' 

Natural Science' 

History^ 

Math' 

Physical Education Elective. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 

3 or 4 
4 
3 

16/17 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

3or4 

3 

15 or 16 



Spring Semester 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers' 

EC 202 Prin. of Macroeconomics 

MA 1 14 Intro. Finite Math' 

Literature' 

Natural Science' 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Spring Semester 

EC 302 Intermed. Macroeconomics 

Economics Elective" 

Phil., Relig., Vis/Perf. Arts Elective' 

Sci., Technology, and Soc. Elective" 

Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
4 
3 

3 or 4 
1 

14/15 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
16 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

IS 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

EC 45 1 Intro. Econometrics 
Economics Electives'" 
Free Elective 



Credits 

3 

6 

3 

12 



Spring Semester 

EC 490 Res. Seminar in Economic^' 

Economics Elective'" 

Free Electives" 



Credits 

3 

3 

7-10 

13/16 



Minimum Hours Required For Graduation: 120 



'"Cs" or better in both ENG 1 1 1 and 1 12 (or ENG 1 12-H) are required. 

'The mathematics requirement consists of four courses: a two course calculus sequence (either MA 131 and 132 or MA 141; MA 231 or 241); MA 1 14(MA 

214 may substitute); and an elective from the following list (MA 242, 303, 305, 421) 

'Select five (5) courses from (including at least two different sciences): BO 200; BIO 105 (with 106 lab), 125, 181; CH 101 (with 102 lab), 201 (with 202 

lab); MEA 1 00, 1 1 (with 1 1 lab), 1 02 (with 1 1 1 lab), 1 20 (with 1 2 1 lab), 1 30 (with 1 35 lab), 200 (with 2 1 lab); PY 1 23 or 1 24 (with 1 25 or 1 26 lab), 

131, 133, 201, 202, 205, 208, 21 1, 212; SSC 200; ZO 150, 212. One of the following two course sequences must be included among the fivecourses 

(where labs have separate numbers they are given in parethesis and must be taken):(i)CH 101 (102) & 201 (202); (ii) MEA 101 (1 10) & 102 (1 1 1); (iii) 

PY 201 & 202 or PY 205 & 208 or PY 21 1 & 212. 

'Two courses from the GER History list. •*• 

'Two courses from the GER Literature list. ••• 

'CSC 101, 1 10, or 1 12 may substitute for CSC 200. 

'One course chosen from the following GER lists: Anthropology, Politics and Government, Psychology, Cultural Geography, and Sociology. *** 

'Choose from: ENG 331, 332, or 333. Must be taken in the JR year. 

'ST 361, or 372 may substitute for BUS/ST 350. 

'"Economics electives may be chosen from 300 and 400 level EC courses (except EC/ARE 401) and 500 level ECG courses. At least 6 hours must be at the 

400 or 500 level. 

"One course from the GER Science, Technology and Society (Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) list. 

"One course chosen from the following GER lists: Philosophy, Religion, Visual and Performing Arts. 

"EC 498 may substitute for EC 490. Students who write a term paper in another EC or ECG course during their senior year may petition to substitute for an 

extra economics elective for EC 490. 

"Choose enough free electives to bring total hours to at least 122. 

" PEC, PEF, PEH, PEO and PES courses cannot be taken to satisfy this requirement. PE courses may be taken for credit only. 

♦** At least one of these courses must come from the Non-English Speaking Culture list. 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

Open to all undergraduate majors outside the Department of Economics, the minor in economics is designed to give students a basic understanding of 
economic analysis and involve them in applied work in one or more fields of economics. The minor in economics is an excellent complement to many 
majors within the university, including political science, statistics, business, accounting, and engineering. To complete the minor in economics students 
must take EC 205 (or EC 201), EC 301, EC 302, and two additional economics courses at the 300 level or higher for a total of 15 semester hours. Please 
contact the Academic affairs office in Nelson Hall for specific information about admission and other requirements. 



210 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 




Cox Hall. Rooms 113-122 
NCSU Box 8201 
Raleigh. NC 27695-8201 



Phone: 


(919)515-7833 


Fax: 


(919)515-7855 


Inlernel E-mail: 


pams@ncsu.edu 



J. L. Whinen, Dean 

D. L. Solomon, Associate Dean/or Academic Affairs 

R. E. Fomes. Associate Dean for Research 

J. C. Herbert, Director of Undergraduate Enrollment 

W. P. Hill, Director of Student Services/Multicultural Affairs 

The College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences offers programs for students whose interests lie in the basic as well as the applied science and 
mathematical areas. These programs of study and research are offered at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and can lead lo many career 
opportunities. In addition, the College provides the core science and mathematical education support for the entire university. The College consists of five 
academic departments: Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Statistics and Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. It jointly administers academic programs 
in Biochemistry with the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The Center for Research in Scientific Computation, the Institute of Statistics, the State 
Climate Office, the Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing, the Center for the Exploration of the Dinosaurian World, the State Climate Office, 
and the Center for Marine Science and Technology are also associated in whole or in part with the College. 

Graduates of the College are in demand and valued for their well-developed analytical thinking and problem-solving skills. They are recruited for technical 
and administrative positions in industrial research and development laboratories, universities and colleges, non-profit research organizations, and 
government agencies. A large percentage of the graduates undertake advanced study in medical, law, business, or other professional schools as well as 
fijrther study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

The high school student who enjoys computers, mathematics, chemistry, geology, marine science, atmospheric science, or physics, who has an interest in 
natural phenomena and their flindamentai descriptions, and who hopes to make a difference in the quality of life should consider the career opportunities 
opened by degrees in the physical and mathematical sciences. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The College offers undergraduate programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Science degree with majors in chemistry, geology, mathematics, applied 
mathematics, meteorology, natural resources, environmental sciences, physics, and statistics and the Bachelor of Arts degree with majors in geology, 
chemistry and physics. In some programs students may choose to highlight their studies with concentrations in compatible disciplines. For example, they 
may select a marine sciences concentration in physics, chemistry, geology, or meteorology; an earth systems history concentration in geology; an air quality, 
geology, or statistics concentration in an environmental sciences curriculum; or a marine and coastal resources concentration in a natural resources 
curriculum. 

Curricula within the College have similar freshman years, enabling a freshman to change, without loss of time, from one department to another in the 
College. A time-limited Physical and Mathematical Sciences Undesignated (PMU) "curriculum" is offered to students who want to major in one of these 
curricula but have not yet made a decision. Minors are offered in geology, mathematics, meteorology, physics, and statistics. 

PRE-MEDICAL SCIENCES 

Medical and dental schools as well as many other health-related professional schools have long regarded degree programs in the core physical and 
mathematical sciences as excellent "pre-professional" curricula. Some professional schools prefer the in-depth knowledge gained by this route over those 
curricula which offer a cursory view of a variety of topics. For fiirther details, contact Ms. Jennene C. Herbert, Director of Undergraduate Enrollment. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Students may wish to earn bachelor's degrees in two fields within the College. Other students may wish to combine a bachelor's degree in the College with 
one in another NC State college or school. With effective planning, a number of courses can satisfy core, general education, or elective requirements 
simultaneously in both degree programs. For example, many students choose to pursue simultaneous degrees in mathematics and mathematics education or 
one the physical sciences and science education. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

In addition to university-wide extracurricular activities and honor organizations, the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences has student chapters of 
the following professional and honor organization: Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics Honors Society); Society of Physics Students; Pi Mu Epsilon (National 
Mathematical Honorary Fraternity); Society for Undergraduate Mathematics (A Student Chapter of the Mathematical Association of America); Phi Lambda 
Upsilon (National Honorary Chemical Society); American Chemical Society; National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists 
and Chemical Engineers; Mu Sigma Rho (Statistics Honorary Society); Statistics Club; American Meteorological Society; Society of Mining 
Engineers/Society of Exploration Geophysicists (Geology Club); National Association of Environmental Professionals (Student Chapter); and the nation's 
first chapter of the Society of African-American Physical and Mathematical Scientists. 

FACILITIES 

Faculty and students within the College have access to an extensive array of computational and network services. Extensive use of computers to fulfill the 
daily task requirements encompasses word processing, electronic mail, information access form the library and Internet, and the use of numerous specialized 
sof^are tool. The College provides a large number of workstations for use by undergraduate and graduate majors and is a participant in the University's 
campus-wide workstation network. Individual departments will either utilize these workstations or provide additional platforms for work with discipline 
specific programs; for example instruction or research in mathematics, statistics, satellite data acquisition and analysis, weather modeling, chemistry, or 
physics. Additionally, students have access to university facilities for additional workstations, peripherals, and services; there is a fully staffed help desk to 
assist students with problems that they might encounter. Upon enrolling at the University, students receive personal accounts and are offered an introduction 
to the computing facilities during their first regular semester on campus. Further there is an extensive set of computer based courses available to the 
university community to fiirther their understanding of applications packages, operating systems, networking, and other computer skills. 

211 



Modem research facilities are also accessible and convenient to students in each department. These range from highly specialized laboratories such as those 
in solid state physics or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to state-of-the-art instruments such as X-ray diffractometers and electron spin resonance 
spectrometers. These laboratories are routinely utilized by advance undergraduates taking part in research programs. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, FIELD EXPERIENCE, AND UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 

The College recognizes the value of career-related work experience to students and encourages its majors to avail themselves of such opportunities whenever 
possible. That experience may be gained through the university's Cooperative Education Program, department sponsored field experience, academic 
research, and summer employment. Advisers work with students to develop a plan of study that balances a challenging course load with appropriate 
extracurricular activities. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Well-prepared students entering the College may seek advanced placement in biology, chemistry, computer science, foreign language, history, mathematics, 
statistics, or physics by passing qualifying examinations. 

SCHOLARS PROGRAMS 

Academically talented high school seniors may be selected to participate in the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences Scholars Program. Enriched 
courses, including chemistry, English, mathematics, and physics, have been developed specifically for program participants. Scholars and honors sections of 
classes are small, allowing for more intellectually stimulating student-to-student and student-to-faculty interactions. Weekly forum and field trips enrich the 
educational and cultural experiences of students. Completion of scholars and honors courses and programs is recognized on students' permanent transcripts. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 

Students taking upper-level courses in their major may, if they have a specified grade point average and recommendation of an upper-level course instructor, 
be invited to participate in a departmental Honors Program in order to create a are individualized and challenging major academic program. Participants 
elect to fulfill departmental Honors Program requirements by engaging in research projects and more rigorous courses, often at the graduate level. In 
appropriate instances students receive graduate credit in the senior year toward the Master of Science degree for their honors work. 

Completion of honors courses and programs is recognized on students' permanent transcripts. Departmental Honors Programs are offered in all departments 
of the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (See Chemistry, Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Statistics). For 
Biochemistry, see College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences majors may be eligible for a variety of freshman and undergraduate College and departmental scholarships 
in addition to those administered at the university level. The awards are based on a combination of factors, with a strong emphasis on academic excellence. 
Some scholarships are renewable for up to four years, and some carry opportunities for significant career-related work experience. 

COMMUNITY OUTREACH 

The College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences demonstrates its commitment to community outreach primarily through its Science House on the NC 
State campus. The Science House offers programs for K-12 students and teachers to enhance their understanding of, appreciation for, and involvement in 
mathematics and the physical sciences. The Science House, located on the Centennial Campus, houses classrooms, laboratories and a teaching resource 
library. Vans from the Science House carry Science on the Road demonstration programs and teaching laboratory equipment to schools across North 
Carolina. 

TUTORIAL AND AUDIO- VISUAL ASSISTANCE 

Most of the departments in the College offer students some form of free tutorial assistance, including regularly scheduled review sessions and Supplemental 
Instruction (SI) for selected sections of chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Several departments provide facilities for students to use supplementary 
videotaped or computer-assisted instructional materials on a voluntary basis. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are available with majors in biomathematics, chemistry, marine, earth and atmospheric sciences, 
mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics, and physics. The Master of Biomathematics, Master of Chemistry, and Master of Statistics are also offered. 
The Departments of Statistics, Mathematics and Physics offer BS-MS programs which allow students to enroll in up to twelve credit hours of graduate level 
course work which may be applied toward the requirements of both the bachelor's and master's degrees. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY 

(See College of Agriculture and Life Sciences) 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY www2ncsu.edu/ncsu/chemistry/chem.html 

Dabney Hall, Room 108 and Withers Hall 
Phone: (919)515-2355 

B. M. Novak, Howard J. Schaeffer Distinguished Professor & Head 

C. B. Boss, Director of Undergraduate Studies 
R. J. Linderman, Director of Graduate Studies 

R. W. Morrison Jr., Executive Officer, Scheduling Officer 

Chancellor & University Professor: MA. Fox, Glaxo Distinguished University Professor: J.S. Lindsey:^/Mmn; Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: 
F.C. Hentz, Jr; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor Emeritus: W.P. IxiC^sr, Professors: A.J. Banks, R.D. Bereman, E.F. Bowden, C.L. 
Bumgardner, H.H. Carmichael, D.L. Comins, K.W. Hanck, M.H. Khaledi, S.G. Levine, R.J. Linderman, CO. Moreland, JO. Osteryoung, R.A. Osteryoung, 
A. F. Schreiner, G. H. Wahl Jr., M-H. Whangbo, J.K. Whitesell, J.L. "^hxnsn^Professors Emeriti: L.D. Freedman, F.W. Getzen, Z.Z. Hugus, L. A. Jones, 
R.H. Leoppert G.G. Long, ST. Purrington, E.G. Stejskal, R.C. ^\\Ae, Associate Professors: C.B. Boss, T.C. Caves, DA. Shultz, W.L. Switzer, D.W. 
Wertz; Associate Professor Emeritus: A.F. Coots, Y. Ebisuzaki; Assistant Professors: D.L. Feldheim, S. Fanzen, C.B. Gorman, J.D. Martin, B. Wang; 
Assistant Professor Emeritus: W.R. Johnston; Research Assistant Professors: J. J. O'Dea, R. W. Wagner, H. Yang; Visiting Assistant Professors: S.L. 
Levine, M.Prisant, K.A. Sandberg, L.E. Sremaniak; Associate Faculty: D.W. Brenner (Materials Science and Engineering), J.D. Otvos (Biochemistry): 
Laboratory Supervisors: P.D. Boyle, H.S. Gracz, C.A. Haney, L.W. Harrison, G.L. Hennessee, G.A. Neyhart, S. S. SanksaXaboratory Demonstrator: S.P. 
Holt; Teaching and Research Technician: D.E. Knight; Teaching Technician: M.L. Belisle. 

212 



Chemistry is the science dealing with the composition, structure, and properties of all substances and changes that they undergo. Chemists have contributed 
to the synthetic fiber industry, petroleum products and fuels, plastics, the food processing industry, nuclear energy, electronics, modem drugs and medicine. 
Today's chemists are concerned with the fundamental building blocks of all materials - atoms and molecules - leading to improvement of old materials, 
development of substitutes or new ones, and an understanding of our material environment. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The chemical industry is the nation's largest manufacturing industry Chemists comprise the largest proportion of scientists in the United States and future 
demand for chemists should continue to grow. A variety of jobs are open to the chemist: biochemistry and other biological areas, education, medicine, law, 
metallurgy, marine science, space science, oceanography, sales and management, pure research and development. Chemists are employed in every field 
based on modem technology; opportunities for chemists in the field of education are many and varied. 

CURRICULA 

The B.A. program offers a flexible course of studies for students who may not plan to become professional chemists but who desire an interdisciplinary 
program with an emphasis on chemistry. The proper choice of electives will prepare the graduate for any of the following: medical, veterinary or dental 
school; work in chemical sales and management; teaching in secondary schools; work in environmental science; or graduate school in an allied science. 
Since the first three semesters are essentially identical to those of the B.S. program, students may enter the B.A. program either directly from high school or 
some later point afler entering the university. 

The B.S. curriculum, accredited by the American Chemical Society, includes a strong, broad background in mathematics, physics and the liberal arts. The 
basic areas of organic, physical, inorganic and analytical chemistry are stressed. Laboratory and classroom work develop the skills, knowledge and inquiring 
spirit necessary for a successful career in chemistry. The advised elective credits allow individual diversity at the junior and senior levels. Many 
undergraduates participate in current departmental research through part-time employment or research projects. The B.S curriculum prepares the student to 
enter the job market directly as a chemist or to enter various professional schools or graduate school in chemistry or an allied science. This route is also an 
excellent premedical program. 

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry-Marine Sciences Concentration provides students the knowledge associated with a B.S. degree in chemistry but also 
applies that knowledge to a natural environmental setting (in this case, the marine environment). Many students have an environmental awareness and a 
desire to pursue environmental issues along with their interest in physical science. This degree allows a student to take all of the courses necessary to become 
an accredited ACS (American Chemical Society) chemist along with the oceanography courses necessary to apply that chemical information to an 
interesting and complex environment like the ocean. 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY 
Degree earned: B.A. in Chemistry 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science' 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric' 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus I' 

PMS 100 Orientation to PAMS ' 

Humanities/Social ScienceElective^ 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science' 

1 CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

3 ENG 1 12 Comp. and Reading' 

4 MA 24 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II 
1 Humanities/Social Science Elective 

3 Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness^ 
15 



Credits 
3 
1 
3 
4 
3 
1 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry l' 
PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. 1' 
History Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II' 

4 PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 

3 Literature Elective' 

3 Physical Education Elective 

14 Free Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
1 
3 
IS 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry' 

Advised Elective' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 

Science Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
3 
4 
15 



Spring Semester 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 

Advised Elective' 

Science Elective 

Writing Elective' 



Credits 
4 
4 
4 
3 
IS 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry I 
Advised Electives' 
Humanities/Social Science Electives' 
Free Elective 



Spring Semester 

BCH 45 1 Introductory Biochemistry 
Advised Electives' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 
Free Elective 



Credits 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 121 



'D grades are NOT accepted in CH 101. CH 107. CH 221. CH 223. CH 315. CH 331. ENG 1 1 1. ENG 1 12. MA 141. PY 205. 

'The Fitness & Wellness requirement can be met by taking any one of several PE 100 courses. 'These courses, selected from University-approved General 

213 



Education Requirements (GER) lists for Humanities and Social Sciences, must includes the following: one course (3 hours) from Philosophy, Religion, or 

Visual and Performing Arts; two courses (6 hours) representing two different areas in Anthropology, Cultural Geography, Economics, Politics and 

Government, Psychology, and/or Sociology; one course (3 hours) from the Science, Technology and Society (Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) 

list. At least one of the courses chosen to satisfy the Humanities and Social Sciences requirement must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'To be selected from GER History Electives List. 

'To be selected from GER Literature Electives List. 

'Advised electives are designed to allow students to concentrate in areas related to academic or career goals. Courses used to fulfill this requirement are 

selected by students after consultation with and approval by their advisers or the Coordinator of Advising. 

'To be selected from GER Advanced Writing List. 

*AI1 students must demonstrate foreign language proficiency at the FL_102 level. 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY 
Degree earned: B.S. in Chemistry 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science^ 

CH 102 General Chemistry Lab 

CH 106 Computer Applic. Chemistry I 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric' 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calculus l' 

PMS 100 Orientation to PAMS 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 



Is Spring Semester 

3 CH 20 1 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science^ 

1 CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

1 CH 108 Computer Applic. Chemistry II 

3 ENG 112 Comp. and Reading' 

4 MA 241 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II' 
1 Humanities/Social Science Elective? 

3 Any lOO-level PE in Fitness & Wellness^ 
16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III' 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I' 

History Elective' 

Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
4 
4 
4 
3 
I 
16 



Spring Semester 

CH 21 1 Analytic Chemistry I 

CH 212 Analytic Chemistry I Lab 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II' 

MA 341 Diff. Equations I 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II' 



Credits 
3 
1 
4 
3 
4 
15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 401 Syst. Inorganic Chemistry I 
CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis 
CH 431 Physical Chemistry I' 
Advised Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective* 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Spring Semester 

CH 402 Inorganic Chemistry Lab 
CH 403 Syst. Inorganic Chemistry II 
CH 433 Physical Chemistry II' 
CH 434 Physical Chemistry Lab 
Advised Elective' 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Credits 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 415 Analytic Chemistry II 
CH 416 Analytic Chemistry Lab 
CH 435 Infro. Quantum Chemistry or 
PY 407 Intro. Modem Physics 
Advised Elective' 
Writing Electives' 
Free Elective 



Spring Semester 
Advised Elective' 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 
Literature Elective' 
Free Elective 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 
3 
12' 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 121^'' 

'D grades are NOT accepted in CH 101, CH 201, CH 221, CH 223, CH 431, CH 433, ENG 1 1 1, ENG 1 12, MA 141, MA 241, MA 242, PY 205, PY 208. 

'Fitness and Wellness requirement can be met by taking any one of several PE 100 courses. 

'These courses, selected from University-approved General Education Requirements (GER) lists for Humanities and Social Sciences, must include the 

following: one course (3 hours) from Philosophy, Religion, or Visual and Performing Arts; two courses (6 hours) representing two different areas in 

Anthropology, Cultural Geography, Economics, Politics and Government, Psychology, and/or Sociology; one course (3 hours) from the Science, 

Technology and Society (Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) list At least one of the courses chosen to satisfy the Humanities and Social Sciences 

requirement must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'To be selected from GER History Electives List. 

'Advised electives are designed to allow students to concentrate in areas related to academic or career goals. Courses used to fulfill this requirement are 

selected by students after consultation with and approval by their advisers or the Coordinator of Advising. 

"To be selected from GER Advanced Writing List. 

'To be selected from GER Literature Electives List. 

"This semester is deliberately light so that students will have time for research or other special projects and interests. 

'All students must demonstrate foreign language proficiency at the FL_I02 level. 



214 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY, MARINE SCIENCES CONCENTRATION' 
Degree earned: B.S. in Chemistry 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science' 

CH 102 CJeneral Chemistry Lab 

CH 106 Computer Applic. Chemistry I 

ENG 1 1 1 Comp. and Rhetoric' 

MA 141 Analytic Geom. & Calc I' 

PMS 100 Orientation to PAMS 

Humanities/Social ScienceElective' 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester 

3 CH 201 Chemistry - A QuantiUtive Science' 

1 CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Lab 

1 CH 108 Computer Applic. Chemistry II 

3 ENG 1 1 2 Comp. and Reading' 

4 MA 24 1 Analytic Geom. & Calculus II' 
1 Humanities/Social Science Electives' 

3 Any 100-level PE in Fitness & Wellness' 
16 



Credits 
3 
1 
1 
3 
4 
3 



16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry l' 

MA 242 Analytic Geom. & Calculus III' 

MEA 200 Intro, to Ocenaography' 

MEA 210 Oceanography Lab' 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. l' 



Credits Spring Semester 

4 CH 2 1 1 Analytic. Chemistry I 

4 CH212 Analytic. Chemistry I Lab 

3 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II' 
1 MEA 220 Marine Biology' 

4 PY 208 Physics for Engr & Sci. II' 
16 Physical Education Elective 



Credits 
3 
1 
4 
3 
4 
1 
16 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 401 Syst. Inorganic Chemistry I 
CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis 
CH 431 Physical Chemistry I' 
MA 341 Diff. Equations I 
Humanities/Social Science Elective' 



Credits Spring Semester 

3 CH 402 Inorganic Chemistry Lab 

3 CH 403 Syst. Inorganic Chemistry II 

3 CH 433 Physical Chemistry 11' 

3 CH 434 Physical Chemistry Lab 

3 MEA 323 Earth System Chemistry' 

15 History Elective' 



Credits 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
16 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

CH 415 Analytical Chemistry II 
CH 416 Analytical Chemistry Lab 
CH 435 Intro. Quantum Chemistry or 
PY 407 Intro, to Modem Physics 
MEA 473 Chemical Oceanography' 
Writing Electives* 
Free Elective 



Spring Semester 

Humanities/Social Science Electives* 
Literature Elective' 
Free Elective 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation: 



Credits 
6 
3 
3 
12' 



'in the Marine Sciences concentration, the designated MEA courses constitute Advised Electives. This increases by one credit the requirement of the straight 

B.S. program. This increase is accommodated by decreasing free elective credits by one (to 4), keeping the minimum hours required for graduation at 121. 

'D grades are NOT accepted in CH 101. CH 201, CH 221, CH 223. CH 431, CH 433. ENG 1 1 1. ENG 1 12, MA 141, MA 241, MA 242, PY 205, PY 208. 

'Fitness and Wellness requirement can be met by taking any one of several PE 100 courses. 

''These courses, selected from University-approved General Education Requirements (GER) lists for Humanities and Social Sciences, must include the 

following: one course (3 hours) from Philosophy, Religion, or Visual and Performing Arts; two courses (6 hours) representing two different areas in 

Anthropology, Cultural Geography, Economics, Politics and Government, Psychology, and/or Sociology; one course (3 hours) from the Science.Technology 

and Society (Humanities and Social Sciences Perspective) list. At least one of the courses chosen to satisfy the Humanities and Social Sciences requirement 

must focus on a non-English speaking culture. 

'To be selected from GER History Electives List. 

'To be selected from GER Advanced Writing List. 

'To be selected from GER Literature Electives List. 

"This semester is deliberately light so that students will have time for research or other special projects and interests. 

'All students must demonstrate foreign language proficiency at the FL_102 level. 



215 



DEPARTMENT OF MARINE, EARTH AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES http //ww2 ncsu edu/ncsu/pams/meas/ 

Jordan Hall, Room 1 125 
Phone: (919)515-3717 

L.J. Pietrafesa, Head 

D.L. Wolcott, Undergraduate Coordinator and Marine Sciences Undergraduate Programs 

E.F. Stoddard, Geology Undergraduate Programs 

G.W. Watson, Meteorology Undergraduate Programs 

University Distinguished Scholar: T.F. Malone; Scholar in Residence: R. BtahamMumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: V.V. Cavaroc Jr., C.E. 
Knowler; Professors; S.P.S. Arya, N.E. Blair, V.V. Cavaroc Jr., J.M. Davis, D.J. DeMaster, R.V. Fodor, G.S. Janowitz, D.L. Kamykowski, Y-L. Lin, L.J. 
Pietrafesa, S. Raman, V.K. Saxena, T.G. Wolcott; Visiting Professors: T.F. Clark, T.S. Hopkins, H. Reichle, D.A. Russell;/4i^i/nc/ Professors: S. Change, 
A.H. Hines, R.K.M. Jayanty, S.K. LeDuc, R.V. Madala, P. Minnet J.M. Pelissier, S. Riggs, W.H. Snyder, G.W. Ihay^xJ'rofessors Emeriti: H.S. Brown, 
L.J. Langfelder, C.J. Leith, W.J. Saucier, C.W. '^e\h-i\ Associate Professors: J.P. Hibbard, M.M. Kimberley, S.E. Koch, C.E. Knowles, EL. Leithold, J.M. 
Morrison, A.J. Riordan, F.H.M. Semazzi, P-T. Shaw, W.J. Showers, E.F. Stoddard, G.F. Watson, D.L. \^o\co\X;Research Professor: V. Aneja; Visiting 
Associate Professors: E.N. Buckley, V.S. Connors, ML. Kaplan;^i^u/ic< Associate Professors: M.G. Bevis, S. Businger, V.S. Conners, R.S. Harmon, L.A. 
Levin, R. Wiener; Assistant Professors: T.G. Drake, D.B. Eggleston, D.G. Evans, S.W. Snyder, L. Xie; Adjunct Assistant Professors: W.G. Ambrose, D.E. 
Checkley, T.B. Curtin, A.F. Hanna, G.J. Kirkpatrick, J.C. Reid, S. Ross, R.J. Wayland 

The Department of MEAS covers a broad range of disciplines with one overarching goal: a deeper understanding of the Earth's environment. MEAS takes an 
interdisciplinary approach to studying our planet's air, earth and water, combining meteorology, earth science, and oceanography in a single department. 

This interdisciplinary viewpoint is particularly important today, in light of accelerating global changes and increasing corporate and public interest in 
environmental health and wise use of natural resources. Many pressing questions require more than narrow training in a single discipline. MEAS graduates 
can be equipped for tasks as diverse as improving severe storm forecasting; assessing potential effects of oil exploration; modeling global climate trends or 
coastal flooding; understanding the transport of tree-killing air pollutants from industrial centers to the North Carolina mountains; developing non-polluting 
technology for mining; ascertaining dinosaurian physiology and ecological niches; investigating global ozone depletion, or devising plans to minimize 
erosion and pollution of coastlines. 

MEAS offers degrees in meteorology, geology, environmental sciences and natural resources. Marine sciences concentrations, which are highly 
interdisciplinary curricula, are available in chemical oceanography, physical oceanography, coastal geology, and marine meteorology. Earth science courses 
encompass the entire earth, from the core, through the crust, to the minerals, sediments, groundwater, and landforms of the surface. Tools learned allow 
students to understand and characterize the physical and historical earth. Other courses provide knowledge to explain the internal forces of the Earth, and to 
investigate the Earth by measuring physical phenomena like gravity, magnetism, heat, electricity and acoustic waves. 

Coursework in all areas of geology equip students to reduce potential disasters from geological hazards and to ameliorate the negative impact of human 
society on the geological resources of the earth. An earth systems history concentration produces graduates knowledgeable about the evolution of earth 
ecosystems. Meteorology training teaches students how the atmosphere functions, and how to address problems like air pollution, climate changes, and 
severe weather, such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, winter storms, and hurricanes. Forecasting and climate studies are enhanced by using real-time satellite 
imagery, radar-data products, and state-of-the-art computer technology. MEAS majors in Environmental Sciences and Natural Resources fill a unique need 
in today's society as experts who can interpret their science to public policy shapers and decision-makers. The training they receive in economics, political 
science, and policy issues, and management (for Natural Resources majors) equips MEAS graduates to interact with industry, and with regulatory and 
conservation agencies. 

Planet Earth is MEAS's natural laboratory. While most scientists conduct experiments under controlled conditions designed to replicate some facets of 
nature, we use ships, submarines, aircraft, and satellites and unattended monitoring instruments to directly and remotely probe the natural environment itself 
Computer modeling helps us visualize the real-world information, and to design the next experiments. Field study is an integral part of MEAS educational 
programs, enabling students to apply concepts learned in the classroom to projects in the field. Summer field courses take students to the Southwest or to the 
North Carolina coast for intensive training in field methods. Shorter field trips are part of classes in all disciplines. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

MEAS undergraduate degree programs provide talented students with the foundation of scientific knowledge for careers in government, industry or 
academe. Graduates in all fields can meet a critical need for well-trained teachers in the sciences by pursuing a double major in a core science and in science 
education. These undergraduate curricula also prepare students to pursue graduate or professional degrees. Careers are open to all genders and races. 

Graduates with a